Kodak Eastman: Pleaser

Notes related to specific cameras
bill339
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Kodak Eastman: Pleaser

Postby bill339 » Wed Feb 03, 2021 6:32 pm

The Kodak Pleaser was an instant Kodak pack film camera introduced in 1977 and discontinued in 1982. The camera shutter and other electronics were powered by a size J six volt alkaline battery that was housed in the bottom of the lens assembly cone and accessed from the outside. The camera did not have a motorized exposed picture ejector but used a manual fold in crank handle to eject the frame and start the development portion. The Pleaser, The Pleaser II, The Handle, The Handle II, EK2, EK20, EK22, and the (Coke) Happy Times were the same camera with different color schemes. The Handle and others had a battery test button that the Pleasure does not have. Other features of the Pleaser are a 100mm f/12.7 lens, eye level optical viewfinder, print number view window in the back cover, rudimentary exposure compensation dial on the front barrel, and 2 second to 1/300 of a second shutter speeds that were set by the camera with some feedback from the exposure compensation dial.
Patent infringement case: 1986 ended Kodak’s instant camera phase after the patent infringement case was won by Polaroid. Polaroid was to be paid $909,000,000 out of the 5.7 billion they sued for. Kodak was also ordered to stop producing all their instant film and instant film cameras. Kodak gave the money back to owners of the cameras after losing to Polaroid but only if you registered the camera, filled out the paper work, and sent in the front name plate and so many of these cameras are without name plate. An estimated 4.3 million owners were registered with the company for compensation since Kodak dropped the product line out of 16.5 million instant cameras Kodak sold over a 10-year period in the United States. The settlement involved four groups of instant cameras made by Kodak with ten cameras in group 1 ($50), fourteen in group 2 ($55), six in group 3 ($60), and nine in group 4 ($70) for a total of 39 cameras and the money was a combination of cash, 1 stock in Kodak, new camera replacement, and or redeemable Kodak coupons.

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