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Manufacturer:Model Manufacture years Serial Number Date acquiredPrice PaidComments
3D TECHNOLOGY: 3D Trio camera  3D TECHNOLOGY: 3D Trio1998 200810.00This is an Image Tech Trio 3D camera; it’s a very simple “point and shoot” 35mm camera. It’s got a built-in flash and a semi-rugged olive green plastic body. Manufactured in 1998 by a company out of Norcross, Georgia, this was one of several cameras to try to create 3D images on 35mm film. You put a roll of 35mm film in the camera, and after shooting about a dozen and a half pictures, you mailed the roll to a special photo processing lab and they would send you back a set of pictures that were affixed to lenticular plastic. Essentially, you received 3D pictures, albeit the same type of 3D that you could find in those old “magic motion” trading cards from the late 1800’s early 1900’s but these were in color. If you get a viewer you can see 3D images just like the old Civil War 3D pictures. The problem is that this camera pictured above does not work and listed in Poor condition. It was a victim of battery leakage and is worth 50 cents for parts in 2013.
3D TECHNOLOGY: ImageTech 3D FX camera  3D TECHNOLOGY: ImageTech 3D FX1996 201010.00This is a 35 mm viewfinder lenticular stereo camera manufactured by 3D Image Technology, Inc., P.O. Box 4300, Norcross, Georgia 30091-4300, USA. The camera was introduced in 1996 and used the 135 film cartridge. The separation between each lens is 18.5mm and the Plastic lenses are 1:9.5/27 mm with diaphragms Fixed at f/9.5. These are fixed focus from 1.2 m to infinity with a mechanical guillotine type shutter behind the lenses. The shutter is cocked with film transport and the one shutter speed is 1/100 of a second. The camera has a thumb wheel film advance and a Newton viewfinder. The film is loaded and rewound manually after pressing a release button located on the bottom of the camera. The camera also has a built in flash unit, frame counter S to 24, ¼ inch by 20 thread tripod socket, fold down rewind crank, double exposure prevention, "flash ready" LED, and has a handy built in carry strap. The camera on two AA batteries and the instructions recommend you use 400 ASA film for best results. The ImageTech 3Dfx is one of several lenticular 3D cameras sold under the ImageTech brand. The Kalimar 3D was a clone of this camera. Other, more well-known lenticular 3D cameras are the Nimslo and the Nishika. All lenticular 3D cameras incorporate multiple lenses to produce multiple images taken simultaneously from slightly different angles. Producing the final lenticular print requires special processing whereby the individual images are sliced up into very thin vertical strips which are then interlaced and covered with a sheet of plastic that has long vertical lenses in it. These lenses focus on different images depending on the viewing angle. When you tilt the lenticular picture back and forth, left and right, you see the original images one at a time which causes the illusion of 3D. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
3D TECHNOLOGY: ImageTech 3D FX camera  3D TECHNOLOGY: ImageTech 3D FX1996 20155.00This is a 35 mm viewfinder lenticular stereo camera manufactured by 3D Image Technology, Inc., P.O. Box 4300, Norcross, Georgia 30091-4300, USA. The camera was introduced in 1996 and used the 135 film cartridge. The separation between each lens is 18.5mm and the Plastic lenses are 1:9.5/27 mm with diaphragms Fixed at f/9.5. These are fixed focus from 1.2 m to infinity with a mechanical guillotine type shutter behind the lenses. The shutter is cocked with film transport and the one shutter speed is 1/100 of a second. The camera has a thumb wheel film advance and a Newton viewfinder. The film is loaded and rewound manually after pressing a release button located on the bottom of the camera. The camera also has a built in flash unit, frame counter S to 24, ¼ inch by 20 thread tripod socket, fold down rewind crank, double exposure prevention, "flash ready" LED, and has a handy built in carry strap. The camera on two AA batteries and the instructions recommend you use 400 ASA film for best results. The ImageTech 3Dfx is one of several lenticular 3D cameras sold under the ImageTech brand. The Kalimar 3D was a clone of this camera. Other, more well-known lenticular 3D cameras are the Nimslo and the Nishika. All lenticular 3D cameras incorporate multiple lenses to produce multiple images taken simultaneously from slightly different angles. Producing the final lenticular print requires special processing whereby the individual images are sliced up into very thin vertical strips which are then interlaced and covered with a sheet of plastic that has long vertical lenses in it. These lenses focus on different images depending on the viewing angle. When you tilt the lenticular picture back and forth, left and right, you see the original images one at a time which causes the illusion of 3D. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
AGFA: Agfamatic 4000 Pocket camera  AGFA: Agfamatic 4000 Pocket1974 201216.00Introduced in 1974 the 4000 is the evolved version of the model 2000 with a more luminous objective with a 26mm lens and a variable exposition controlled by an electronic shutter. The camera also has variable shutter speeds of 1/250 of a second to 30 seconds and the focus selected with pictograms of a Mountain, a two person Group plus a person from the waste up. These pictograms are accompanied by a scale of distance (in blue characters), in feet or meters coupled to diagrams for the utilization of the Magi cube at distances of 4m, 2m, and 1 to 2m. An LED in the finder indicates the correct exposure and if you have to use the flash. When you insert a Magi cube this automatically fixes the shutter speed on 1/50 of a second. The identifiers on this camera are "AGFAMATIC 4000", "pocket", and the Agfa logo engraved in black. On the front panel, "AGFAMATIC 4000" and "sensor" in white print located on the top panel. Also a bright red shutter button, hidden viewfinder until opened, and a ¼ 20 tripod socket with a handy carry strap screwed in it. The camera pictured is in Fine condition and worth $30.00 in 2014.
AGFA: Autostar X-126 camera  AGFA: Autostar X-1261972 20165.00The Agfa Autostar X-126 is a plastic-bodied Galilean optical viewfinder camera for 126 Kodapak film cartridges, made by Agfa in about 1972. The camera has a fake meter-cell window: in fact the camera has fixed exposure, and fixed focus. It was manufactured at the Agfa plant in Suzano Brazil and the factory is still in that location. The camera also has an f12 42mm lens, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, film view window for frame count, X-flashcube mount on the top, right thumb film advance wheel, 1/50th of a second shutter, shutter release button, and a carry strap hard point. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $5.00 in 2016.
AGFA: Billy Record 7.7 camera  AGFA: Billy Record 7.71933-1949 201612.001933-1949 Poor condition worth $8.00 for repair or parts in 2016 (shutter lever sticks)
AGFA: Iso Pak C camera  AGFA: Iso Pak C1969-1970 20175.50The Iso-Pak C is an evolved version of the Iso-Pak. It uses the then popular flashcubes introduced in the early 1960’s. To activate the flashcubes the camera uses two CR2025 batteries. With the C model the thumb wheel film advance was replaced by a single action lever film advance, which has greater speed to the next frame. The German made camera also has a Parator shutter assembly with a fixed focus lens. The shutter speed of 1/100 of a second is regulated automatically down to 1/40 of a second with the installation of the flashcube. The flash range was 1.5 to 3 meters (5 to 10ft). The camera sold for about $100.00 and $117.00 for the kit. This 126 film pack camera was introduced in 1969 and manufacturing stopped the following year in late 1970. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
AGFA: Iso Pak Ci camera  AGFA: Iso Pak Ci1969 201510.001969 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015
AGFA: Isoly I camera  AGFA: Isoly I1960 200510.00Isoly is a series of medium format viewfinder film cameras made by Agfa and produced from 1960 to 1971. These cameras use 120 film for 16 frames of 4x4cm. Also, diapositive films can be used. The different models are distinguished by their lens and shutter specifications. They were offered with different lens options. Isoly, later renamed “Isoly I”, still retaining its character as the basic model. The Isoly name was used again in the 1980s for a 35mm camera named as the Agfa Isoly 100. The Isoly I has a single shutter speed of 1/30 of a second and a focus distance (in meters) of 5 to infinity in sunlight, or 2.5 to 5m in close up. The Aperture size is 11; 16, it has a self-timer, flash shoe, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod hard point. The Isoly instructions recommend B/W ASA/ISO 40 film for sunlight and ASA/ISO 100 film for dull days. Overall the camera is very forgiving of the available light given such few settings. This one pictured comes with the Agfa Isoly Blitz flash unit, is in fine condition, and is worth $25.00 in 2015.
AGFA: Karat 3.5 camera  AGFA: Karat 3.51938-1941 199822.00Agfa Karat 3.5 camera was produced in Germany from 1938 to 1941. Karat 36 designed for standard 35mm cassettes, this unit uses the unique "karat cassettes" which transport film from a loaded cassette to an empty take up one. The sprocket "teeth" aid in the transport system as do two unique folding flaps that hold the emulsion flat on the film tracks. The pressure plate also does its part to ensure flatness. The bellows are hidden behind the lens mount plate. A button on the top body plate unlocks them to a fully extended state, and a thumb lever at 3 o'clock enables the user to retract the bellows in a closed position. Also on the top plate, one will find the tunnel like viewfinder, the advance knob, film counter and the shutter release button. The lens is a Agfa Solinar 3.5 50mm, 2 elements cemented together form the rear group, and the front two elements also cemented together form the front lens group. The focusing is achieved by rotating the front group to the desired distance. The shutter and aperture blades reside between the front and rear lens groups. The shutter is a Compur Rapid rim-set type with speeds from 1 second to 1/500 of a second plus B. It requires manual cocking prior to release. The camera pictured above is in good condition and worth $35.00 in 2016.
AGFA: Optima IA camera  AGFA: Optima IA1962 200010.001962-1983 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
AGFA: Optima II S camera  AGFA: Optima II S1961-1966  199012.001960-1963 Fine condition worth $60.00 in 2014
AGFA: Optima II S camera  AGFA: Optima II S1961-1966  199125.001960-1963 fine condition worth $55.00 in 2014
AGFA: Silette (Type 3) camera  AGFA: Silette (Type 3)1958  201615.001958 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
AGFA: Solinette II camera  AGFA: Solinette II1952-1955  201717.00Agfa made this folding 35mm viewfinder camera between 1952 and 1955. The styling echos the medium-format Agfa Isolette cameras. The Solinette is a horizontal folder, i.e. the bed drops downwards on struts with the camera held horizontally, distinguishing it from the otherwise somewhat similar Kodak Retina. The top plate is almost symmetrical, with matching advance and rewind knobs, and the shutter release button on the right matching the bed release on the left. The shutter is cocked manually. The release button is threaded for a cable release. There is a double-exposure prevention interlock that releases the shutter when the film pin wheel turn during frame advance and it has no override control. The shutter is synchronized for flash, with a PC socket on top of the shutter unit, and a cold shoe on the top plate. The lens focuses to 3½ feet; focusing is by movement of the whole lens and shutter, with a focus ring behind the lens. There is a mechanical frame counter in a window in the middle of the top plate, in front of the accessory shoe. This must be set manually when a new role of film is loaded; the counter is advanced to 'A' by pressing the button on the back of the top housing (the button itself is released by a sliding control on the other side). The camera back is then closed and you advanced the counter to frame 1 after winding the film normally till it stops. The same frame counter button serves as the rewind release. On some examples, there is a film-type reminder dial in the rewind knob. There were two versions of this camera: the Solinette and Solinette II, and the latter is far more common. There were also several lens and shutter variations, as shown in the table below. The camera pictured above is in Poor condition and is worth $5.00 for parts in 2017.
AGFA ANSCO: Cadet B-2 camera  AGFA ANSCO: Cadet B-21937-1940 20156.001937-1938 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
AGFA ANSCO: Cadet D-6 camera  AGFA ANSCO: Cadet D-61935-1941 19997.501935-1941 fine condition worth $12.00 in 2014
AGFA ANSCO: Chief camera  AGFA ANSCO: Chiefc1935-1941  199410.001940 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
AGFA ANSCO: Pioneer PD-16 camera  AGFA ANSCO: Pioneer PD-16c1940  20165.00The Pioneer camera was manufactured by the Agfa Company from 1940 to 1952. Designed as a simple snap-shot camera made of a durable plastic body with metal covers. The camera featured a built-in direct view finder, synchronized flash sockets, and turret lens mounting of a high-quality lens plus a bulb and instantaneous rotary shutter. It was made in two sizes, a PB20 for capturing eight exposures 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 inch on no. 620 or PB20 roll film or a PD16 for capturing eight exposures 2 1/4 x 4 1/4 inch on no. 616 or PD16 roll film. This camera was priced at $2.95 for the PB20 and $3.45 for the PD16. The camera has no double exposure protection and would be a box camera if not for the flash sockets. Most of the information was obtained from the HistoricCamera.com site. The camera pictured here takes the 616 or PD16 film, is in Good condition, and worth $10.00 in 2016..
AGFA ANSCO: Plenax PD-16 camera  AGFA ANSCO: Plenax PD-161935  200010.001934 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
AGFA ANSCO: Shur-Shot camera  AGFA ANSCO: Shur-Shotc1932-1940  20049.001935-1941 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
AGFA ANSCO: Viking camera  AGFA ANSCO: Vikingc1940 200515.001952 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Aiptek: PenCam Trio camera  Aiptek: PenCam Trioc1998  199820.001998 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (2.0MP)
Aiptek: PenCam Trio camera  Aiptek: PenCam Trioc1998  199820.001998 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (2.0MP)
Ansco: Ansco 1065 camera  Ansco: Ansco 10651978  20166.50The Ansco 1065 is a simple 35mm snapshot viewfinder camera manufactured by Haking of Hong Kong, after they had gained ownership of the Ansco trademark in October of 1981. The registration date was filed in September of 1978 by Haking. The camera is the same as the 1979 Ansco 1100 made by the original Ansco company only with a hot shoe instead of a flash bar socket. This camera has a 45mm f/8 fixed focus lens and there is a simple 3-position aperture adjustment labeled with "weather conditions." The top panel includes a two conductor hot shoe for attaching a flash, a resettable frame counter on the top, a fold down rewind crank handle, and a shutter button. The camera also has a right thumb film advance wheel, a ¼” by 20 thread tripod mount, two hard points for attaching a strap, rewind release button on the bottom, and a 45mm view finder. The camera can handle ASA 100 to 400 film and this is recommended for best results. The camera is labeled Made in MACAU and has a Hi (Heye International) logo on the front. Haking’s is mostly known as Halina in the camera world and has produced many a camera under that name. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Ansco: Ansco 1100 camera  Ansco: Ansco 11001979 20050.001980 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Ansco: Ansco 235 camera  Ansco: Ansco 2351979 20095.001979 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Ansco: Ansco 50 camera  Ansco: Ansco 501986 1/1/201410.00110 film camera 1970 Fine condition $12.00 in 2014
Ansco: Ansco 633 Tele-Flash camera  Ansco: Ansco 633 Tele-Flash1985 20145.001985 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Ansco: Ansco 735 DX camera  Ansco: Ansco 735 DX1987-1989  20177.00The 735 DX is a point and shoot film camera produced from 1987 to 1989. It boasts a built-in flash and motorized film advance. It takes still photographs on standard 35mm film. This is an all-black camera, except for the lettering and flash reflector and red version of the camera exists. Lettering on the front indicates that the 735 has "Auto Focus" capability. This camera model is relatively compact and has many features of the time. Its viewfinder and lens are located in the middle of the camera and it needs two AA batteries to be inserted before it will function. This camera also has auto exposure, DX coding capability, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, built in flash, frame counter, motor rewind, flash ready light, film observation window in the back, programed shutter, handy carry strap, and was made in Taiwan. The camera pictured here comes with the original box, the instruction booklet, is in fine condition, and is worth $15.00 in 2017.
Ansco: Ansco M35 camera  Ansco: Ansco M35c1985 20153.001987-1988 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Ansco: Anscoflex II camera  Ansco: Anscoflex II1954 201620.001953-1956 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Ansco: Buster Brown Folding No.3A camera  Ansco: Buster Brown Folding No.3A1913 201520.00The No. 3A Folding Buster Brown camera were manufactured by Ansco in circa 1913. The camera body was made out of wood and covered in seal grain imitation leather. The bellows were made of black leather and the metal parts were nickel plated. It was fitted with a fix-focus meniscus lens or a rapid rectilinear lens and a No. 1 Actus shutter providing instantaneous speeds of 1/25, 1/50 and 1/100th of a second, plus time and bulb. The No. 3A Folding Buster Brown took 3 1/4 x 5 1/2 inch negatives (Postcard size) on Ansco no. 18A and 18B film or no. 122 Kodak film. It measured 2 1/2 x 4 3/4 x 9 3/4 and weighed 40 ounces. It was originally priced around $10.00. This 3A Buster Brown pictured above is in good condition and worth $25.00 in 2017.
Ansco: Buster Brown No.2 camera  Ansco: Buster Brown No.21906-1923  20155.001916-1920 poor condition worth $3.00 in 2015
Ansco: Dollar Box camera  Ansco: Dollar Box1910-1928  20166.001910-1928 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Ansco: Flash Clipper camera  Ansco: Flash Clipper1940s-1952 4/12/199813.00Ansco Flash Clipper: This camera takes the discontinued 616 size film. 616 ran from 1932 until 1984. good condition $10.00 in 2014
Ansco: Flash Clipper camera  Ansco: Flash Clipper1940s-1952 20175.00The Ansco Clipper and Flash Clipper were simple non-adjustable cameras made by Agfa Ansco, later Ansco, from the 1940s into 1954. (The series began as the Agfa Ansco PD16 Clipper, but Agfa branding was dropped during the WWII years.) The lens board pulled out of the camera body for taking pictures, and collapsed to make the camera more compact when not in use. The focus and aperture were fixed, while the shutter had I (Instant) and B (Bulb or timed) settings. The Flash Clipper was modified with an accessory shoe, and a proprietary two-pin flash sync connection beside the lens. The Flash Champion is a name variant of the Flash Clipper. An upmarket, higher-spec version of the same camera (featuring focus and exposure adjustments) was the Clipper Special. The camera was constructed of metal and covered with a water resistant plastic cover. It took sixteen 2 1/2 x 2 1/8 inch sized exposures on standard no. 616 roll film. The Ansco Flash Clipper featured a fixed focus 2 element f11 doublet lens, and a direct optical view finder. The camera measures about 5 x 3 3/4 x 2 1/4 inches when folded. The Ansco Flash Clipper camera with flash unit was originally priced at approximately $18.50. The camera only ranged from $12.50 to $14.50. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Ansco: Junior No.2C camera  Ansco: Junior No.2C1917-1923  201615.001916 good condition worth $30.00 in 2016
Ansco: Junior No.3A camera  Ansco: Junior No.3A1916-1931  5/20/200512.501913-1932 in just good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Ansco: Memo 35 camera  Ansco: Memo 351984-1986  3.001984-1986 poor condition worth $0.50 in 2014
Ansco: Memo Disc HR 10 camera  Ansco: Memo Disc HR 101986-1987  20045.001980 in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2014
Ansco: Memo Disc HR 30 camera  Ansco: Memo Disc HR 301986-1987  20168.00The Ansco Disc HR30 was just one in a series of Ansco HR cameras like the HR 10, HR 10T, HR 15, HR 20, HR 25, HR 40, HR 30, HR 40, HR 50, and the HR 65. The Memo Disc HR 10, Disc HR 10, and the Disc HR 10T names are referring to the same camera and the only HR in the series with the MEMO label under Ansco. This is just a few of the disc cameras produced by Ansco. The HR 30 camera was introduced in 1986 and discontinued a year later in 1987. The camera has a focus free 12.5mm f2.8 fixed focus lens, a built-in electronic flash, flash on/off switch in front, flash ready light in the back, motor drive, camera/lens cover, frame count window in the back, red LED error indicator near the viewfinder, and a handy carry strap. The camera came in 6 available colors: Red, Black, Champagne, Metallic Blue, Silver, and Charcoal Grey. The flash, motor drive and other camera features are powered by two AA batteries suppling 3 volts. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Ansco: Pioneer camera  Ansco: Pioneer1947-1958  N/A8.501947 to 1953 in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2014
Ansco: Pioneer camera  Ansco: Pioneer1947-1958  20165.001947 to 1953 in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016
Ansco: Pix Panorama camera  Ansco: Pix Panoramac1990s  201410.001992 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Ansco: Pix Panorama camera  Ansco: Pix Panoramac1990s  20166.00This 35mm camera is a 100% plastic and is completely fixed — fixed focal length, fixed focus, fixed shutter speed, fixed aperture. There is no way to make any sort of adjustment other than the placement of the camera. It has a 28mm f/11 lens with a 1/125 shutter speed and a 13 x 36mm panorama mask. It was made in China in 1992 and they did make a version without a built in flash. The other features it does have are a built in lens cove that locks the shutter button when closed, frame counter on top, rewind release button on the bottom with a rewind fold away crank lever on top that releases the film when pulled up, panorama masked viewfinder, a flash on/off switch, flash ready LED near the viewfinder, a right thumb film advance wheel, and a handy carry strap. The print size it produced was 89 x 254mm or 3.5” x 10”. The camera pictured above is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Ansco: Readyflash camera  Ansco: Readyflash1953  201420.001953 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Ansco: Rediflex camera  Ansco: Rediflex1950  201320.001950 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Ansco: Rediflex camera  Ansco: Rediflex1950  20155.001950 Poor condition worth $2.00 in 2015 (shutter needs work)
Ansco: Shur Flash camera  Ansco: Shur Flash1953  199410.001953-1960 Good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Ansco: Shur Flash camera  Ansco: Shur Flash1953  200310.001953-1960 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Ansco: Shur Flash camera  Ansco: Shur Flash1953  201615.00The Ansco Shur-Flash was basic box camera with flash attachment that was introduced by Ansco in 1953. It was a popular box camera made with a water resistant fiber body covered in black imitation leather and a metal faceplate and viewer. It was capable of capturing eight 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 inch exposures on standard 120 roll film. The camera was fitted with a fixed focus single meniscus lens for taking photos from about 8 feet to infinity. The guillotine shutter provided snap shot speed of about 1/40 of a second. The Ansco Shur-Flash camera was originally priced at $4.95 and the complete outfit with camera, Anscoflash Type III flash attachment, film and flash bulbs costs $9.75. The two AA batteries for the flash were not included. The camera pictured here is in good condition and comes in the original box with the flash unit and 10 flash bulbs. This camea is worth $20.00 in 2016.
Ansco: Shur Shot camera  Ansco: Shur Shot1948  20122.001948 poor condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Ansco: Shur Shot camera  Ansco: Shur Shot1948  1948 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Ansco: Shur Shot Junior camera  Ansco: Shur Shot Junior1948 20158.001948 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Ansco: Silhouette Zoom camera  Ansco: Silhouette Zoom1990s  199345.001990 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Ansco: Speedex 4.5 camera  Ansco: Speedex 4.51946-1950  201715.00The Ansco Speedex 4.5 camera was sold under the Ansco name but features an Afga badge on the internals. It features 4 shutter speeds at 200, 50, 25, and ‘B’ as well as the variable diaphragm from 4.5 through 32. It has adjustable focus which is marked at 3, 3.5, 5, 6, 8, 10, 15, 30, and Infinite feet. It also features a flash sync for mountable flash, a Vario lens, PC flash sync, an optical viewfinder, cold shoe, oval red window in the back cover for frame count, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and double exposure prevention but is over rideable. The Ansco Speedex 4.5 “Special” is basically an Agfa Isolette (German camera) but with an Ansco trademark for the North American market. The Ansco Speedex 4.5 had a 1/200 of a second shutter and the Ansco Speedex 4.5 Special and Special R had a 1/300 of a second shutter and the “R” stood for rangefinder. In 1946 the The Speedex 4.5 sold for $32.00, the Special for $44.00, and the Special R for $50.00. The Speedex 4.5 was produced from 1946 to 1950 but sold for some years later. Like its Agfa twin, the Speedex 4.5 “Special” was aimed to the advanced amateur. It allowed for variable focus and an extended range of exposure settings. In 1955 its advertised price was $47.50 with a leather case for $5 more. The Ansco Speedex, Speedex Special, and Speedex Special R are considered a medium format pocket folder Ansco. Originally the cameras were made by Anthony & Scovill but they merged with Argus in early 1938. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Ansco: Standard Speedex camera  Ansco: Standard Speedex1950  19945.001949-1950 Poor condition worth $5.00 for parts in 2014 (Shutter needs work)
Ansco: Viking (1952) camera  Ansco: Viking (1952)1952  201025.001952-1959 Good condition worth $45.00 in 2014
Ansco: Viking 6.3 camera  Ansco: Viking 6.31946  201722.001946 Good condition worth $80.00 in 2017
Ansco: Vision (Auto Load) camera  Ansco: Vision (Auto Load)1987  20140.001987 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Ansco: Vision (Fully Automatic) camera  Ansco: Vision (Fully Automatic)1987  20138.001987 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Argus: 3D Stereo camera  Argus: 3D Stereo  20175.00Argus currently (1998) makes a stereo camera (right) that uses two mirrors called a beam splitter to create stereo pairs that can be printed in conventional drug store one hour developing shops and viewed with a simple lorgnette. It sells for under $90 including the viewer. This is a rebranded Loreo 3D camera and they use ordinary 35mm film. They require no special processing or printing. Simply have your film processed and printed as usual. The prints will automatically show two different views of your picture, which allows you to enjoy viewing full stereo depth using a 3D viewer. You will be able to see your pictures with a realism no ordinary camera can give you. 3-D pictures require a wide sharpness range so that near and distant objects are shown with equal sharpness. Your cameras 28mm lens is set so that pictures can be taken from as close as 80 cm (2.5 feet) to infinity. The camera has no device for manual focusing adjustment. To activate the flash push the Flash selector switch to the left and the flash will spring open. Best results are obtained if your subject is between 1.5m (5 feet) and 2.5m (8 feet) from the camera with 200 ISO film. 400 ISO speed film increases that range to 3.0m (9 feet). To close the flash reflector, simply push the reflector hood down with your hand until it locks. To conserve the batteries always switch off the flash by closing the reflector hood when not needed. The camera has a flash ready LED next to the viewfinder eye opening and is powered by two AA batteries. Unfortunately the batteries were left in this camera and the flash does not work due to corroded terminals. For this reason the camera is worth $5.00 in 2017.
Argus: Argoflex E camera  Argus: Argoflex E1940-1948  201630.001940-1948 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Argus: Argoflex Seventy-Five camera  Argus: Argoflex Seventy-Five1949-1953 20158.001949-1958 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Argus: Argoflex Seventy-Five camera  Argus: Argoflex Seventy-Five1949-1953 20174.00The Argus Seventy-five has a twin lens reflex design with a fixed-focus lens and everything between 6 feet and infinity will be sharp. For close up shots Argus manufactured lenses that could be fitted. The Argus Seventy-five produces 6x6 images and takes 620 film no longer available. Respooling a role of 120 film to fit the camera isn't hard. You'll need a dark room and two 620 spools if your camera hasn't got an integrated take up spool. This allows you to use the first to spool the 120 film on the first 620 spool, and then roll it onto the second spool. This way it's hardly ever necessary to adjust the tape that connects the film to the paper back. The Argus Seventy-five was manufactured from 1953 to 1958. Virtually indestructible this camera is constructed from thick Bakelite, glass lenses, and Aluminum. The predecessor of this camera was the Argoflex Seventy-five, which was manufactured from 1949 to 1953. The name of the Argoflex Seventy-five was changed to Argus Seventy-five in 1953, which is the same year the name of the Argoflex 40 was changed to Argus 40. This was a marketing campaign for reintroduction of both cameras. The Argus Seventy-five was followed by the Argus 75 (numbers not script), which was manufactured between 1958 and 1964 in a lighter brown color but the same exact camera. To recap the “Argoflex Seventy Five”, the “Argus Seventy Five”, and the “Argus 75” have interchangeable parts but the paint design plus name was changed on the aluminum. In essence Argus was able to manufacture the same camera for 15 years from 1949 to 1964. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth about $5.00 in 2017.
Argus: Argus 345X Electric Eye camera  Argus: Argus 345X Electric Eye1973  20135.001975 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014
Argus: Argus 545 camera  Argus: Argus 5451987  20135.001987 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus 75 camera  Argus: Argus 751958-1964  N/A19.001953-1958 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 with the flash unit
Argus: Argus 75 camera  Argus: Argus 751958-1964  200010.001953-1958 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus 75 camera  Argus: Argus 751958-1964 201210.001953-1958 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus 75 camera  Argus: Argus 751958-1964 201510.001953-1958 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Argus: Argus A Black camera  Argus: Argus A Black1936-1941  200920.001936-1941 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus A Black camera  Argus: Argus A Black1936-1941  199815.001936-1941 Good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus A2 (A2B) camera  Argus: Argus A2 (A2B)1946-1950  199825.001939-1950 Good condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus A2 (A2B) camera  Argus: Argus A2 (A2B)1946-1950  201520.001939-1950 good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (missing the cloth light seal)
Argus: Argus A3 camera  Argus: Argus A31940-1942  20165.001940-1942 good condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Argus: Argus C20 (C-Twenty) camera  Argus: Argus C20 (C-Twenty)1956-1958  201510.001956-1957 good condition worth $15.00 in 2015 (missing a tan insert on top of the rewind wheel)
Argus: Argus C3 camera  Argus: Argus C31939-1966  200710.001939-1966 poor condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus C3 camera  Argus: Argus C31939-1966  199610.001939-1966 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus C3 camera  Argus: Argus C31939-1966  200210.001939-1966 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus C3 camera  Argus: Argus C31939-1966  200210.001939-1966 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus C3 camera  Argus: Argus C31939-1966  199222.001939-1966 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus C3 camera  Argus: Argus C31939-1966  20155.001939-1966 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus C3 camera  Argus: Argus C31939-1966  20175.001939-1966 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus C3 camera  Argus: Argus C31939-1966  20178.001939-1966 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus C3 Matchmatic camera  Argus: Argus C3 Matchmatic1958-1966  201410.001958-1966 Poor condition worth $12.00 in 2014 (Shutter needs work)
Argus: Argus C3 Matchmatic camera  Argus: Argus C3 Matchmatic1958-1966  201210.001958-1966 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Argus: Argus C4 camera  Argus: Argus C41951-1957  201515.001951-1957 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2015
Argus: Argus C44 camera  Argus: Argus C441956-1957 201520.00The Geiss Company of Chicago customized Argus C4 cameras for interchangeable lenses which were made by Enna in Munich, Germany. Argus took what they were doing and followed suit with the C44 (spelled out as "c-forty-four" on the camera itself). The camera shared the same body as the C4, including that model's improved rangefinder/viewfinder. The only real difference was in the lenses. The standard Cintagon 50mm f/2.8 was the first 4-element lens (Tessar-type) that the Ann Arbor factory produced. The design was said to have been computed with the help of an early digital computer, 'MIDAC (Michigan Digital Automatic computer),' belonging to the University of Michigan and developed in 1951. Three other focal lengths were offered as well: 50mm f/1.9; 35mm f/4.5 and 100mm f/3.5. These were manufactured by Steinheil in Germany, to a somewhat higher standard of finish, but also branded Cintagon. However the C44 bayonet is clumsy to use, as a lens cannot be mounted until pairs of small red guide marks inside the mount throat and the lens bayonet are aligned. The C44 employs a behind-the-lens leaf shutter (as do other Argus C-series models), offering speeds of 1/10 to 1/300 of a second and B. This fires with an unexpectedly noisy snap, not unlike a mousetrap closing. The camera's frame counter counts down to 0, so the user must remember to re-set it to the correct number of frames with each re-loading and hope not to bump it accidentally after that. A new C44 owner will search in vain for a rewind-release button. Instead, lifting and slightly twisting the advance knob disengages the film drive and allows the roll to be rewound. The camera does have a two contact hot shoe that went well with the Argus flash unit designed for it. The flash unit mount has a spring loaded center contact and a locking lever on the side to secure it to the camera. It operates using two 1.5 volt C batteries that are loaded in the unit and add quite a bit of weight. The camera pictured here is in poor condition due to a bad shutter and worth $10.00 for parts in 2015.
Argus: Argus Instant Load 164 camera  Argus: Argus Instant Load 1641968 20164.00The Argus Instant Load 164 started being produced in 1968 and ended in 1969 after Sylvania was sold and camera production was suspended. Sylvania owned Argus 10 years at that time. The camera weighs 4.6 ounces and is 4"x2"x2.5". It takes 126 Cartridge film and uses flash cubes that advance with the frame wheel. The flash cube mount is powered by two PX825 batteries that are housed in the film compartment. The PX825 battery is no longer available but replacements do exist. Frames are advanced with a right thumb wheel that also loads the shutter. The camera also has a ¼” by 20 thread tripod mount, optical viewfinder, film view window that shows the frame number, and has a handy carry strap. The 164 was one of the last of the Instant Load series and the cheapest. The Instant Load in the name denotes the ease of film change with 126 cartridge film. This is a point and shoot camera that is closer to a Box camera than cameras of that era. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Argus: Argus Instant Load 257 camera  Argus: Argus Instant Load 2571966  20165.00The following in quotes is from newspaper ad in 1966, the release year. "It’s automatically goof proof! Uses 126 film cartridge load for slides or prints. Has fully automatic electric eye that gives you perfect focus every time! Comparable Value $44.95, now only $27.63.” The camera weighs 13.4 ounces and the Dimensions are 4.75"x2.25"x2.75". It has a flash socket on the top center of the camera under a flip up shield with a flash bulb eject lever in the back. The socket takes the AG3B cap less type flash bulb used on many cameras of the era and rated to 30 meters with 100 ASA film. The flash is powered by two N type batteries held in a compartment with a sliding cover on the bottom of the camera. The lens is an Argus coated Cintar and focus range of 3 feet to infinity. This Instant Load 257 also has a thumb lever film advance, a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and a large shutter button on the front of the camera. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Argus: Argus Instant Load 260 camera  Argus: Argus Instant Load 2601965-1966 20165.00The camera was introduced by Argus in 1965 and discontinued in 1966. Argus was the first brand to follow Kodak at the launch of the cartridge 126. The camera weighs 13.4 ounces and the Dimensions are 4.75"x2.25"x2.75" and uses 126mm film. It has a flash socket on the top center of the camera under a flip up shield with a flash bulb eject lever in the back. The socket takes the AG1 cap less type flash bulb for black and white photos, AG1B (the B stands for blue that omitted the yellow cast of the clear tungsten bulbs that was not a problem with B/W photos) plus the high powered AG3B also for color photos and were used on many cameras of the era. Later models of the Instant Load series used a Flash Cube mount like the Instant Load 264. The flash is powered by two N type batteries held in a compartment with a sliding cover on the bottom of the camera. The f2.8 lens is an Argus coated Cintar and focus range of 3 feet to infinity. This Instant Load 260 also has a thumb lever film advance, a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and a large shutter button on the front of the camera. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $5.00 in 2016.
Argus: Argus Instant Load 270 camera  Argus: Argus Instant Load 2701966-1967 201615.00The Instant Load 270 was introduced in 1966 and was discontinued in 1967. It is a 126 cartridge film (discontinued in 1999) camera with a 40mm f/2.8 lens. It also has a CdS light meter, optical viewfinder, a two connector hot shoe, right thumb lever film advance, and was made in Japan and relabeled Argus, probably made by Mamiya. Argus had not produced a camera in the US since 1963 but did have optics contracts but the era of US-designed and -manufactured cameras had ended. The 270 gives the photographer no help in focusing beyond marking portrait, group, and landscape on the focus barrel. The camera used a PX-13 mercury based battery no longer available or legal to sell. They do make a replacement like the Duracell 625A, Wein Cell Px625, and the Energizer A76. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $30.00 in 2016.
Argus: Argus Instant Load 284 camera  Argus: Argus Instant Load 2841967  20165.00Argus entered the 126 camera market in 1964 with the Argus 260. The Instant Load 284 was released in 1967 as the top end of the Argus 126 cartridge lineup and originally sold for $87. At this stage in its history, Argus was having other manufacturers make a lot of its models and the 284 was made in Japan by Sedic. It has a hot shoe plus a flash cube socket, 40mm Argus Cintagon coated lens, right thumb film advance lever, and a PC socket. It has a CdS cell that could be used to set the shutter speed and aperture. The 284 also has manual aperture settings from f/2.8 to f/22. The shutter speed is around 1/50 of a second. It has two battery compartments, one 625 battery (mercury battery replacement 625A, PX625A, and MRB625) drives the CdS meter. It is worth noting that this camera like others using mercury batteries do not have voltage regulators because the mercury battery discharge was so accurate. The Alkaline replacement batteries will make the camera work but with erratic results without some wiring. The camera also uses two obsolete 1.5 volt PX-825 batteries to power the built in flash cube holder it has on the top. The PX-825 battery is also known as the LR53, EPX825, V825PX, HPX825, RPX825, BLR53, KA825, and Pertrix 7201 some may be available on line. In the case of the 825 battery, you can also find fixes, rigs, and add-ons on line. Focusing is by distance scale and the distance markings are both on the lens and viewable through the viewfinder. The camera pictured here is in Poor working condition and is for display or parts only. It is worth $3.00 in 2016.
Argus: Argus Instant Load 374 camera  Argus: Argus Instant Load 3741968  20163.50This camera was introduced in 1968 and made by the Balda-Werke Company. The body is the same as the Instant Load 164, Instant Load 364, and the Argus Lady Carefree. This is the only one with a fake walnut finish surrounding the lens. The camera production ended in 1969 after Sylvania was sold and camera production was suspended. Sylvania owned Argus 10 years at that time. It takes 126 Cartridge film and uses flash cubes that advance with the frame wheel. The flash cube mount plus electric eye is powered by two PX825 batteries that are housed in the film compartment. The PX825 battery is no longer available but replacements do exist. It is worth noting that this camera like others using mercury batteries do not have voltage regulators because the mercury battery discharge was so accurate. Results with the replacement batteries may be sketchy. Frames are advanced with a right thumb wheel that also loads the shutter. The camera also has a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, optical viewfinder, film view window that shows the frame number, and has a handy carry strap. The Instant Load in the name denotes the ease of film change with 126 cartridge film. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $5.00 in 2016.
Argus: Argus Super Seventy-five camera  Argus: Argus Super Seventy-five1954-1958  201520.001954-1958 fine condition worth $25.00 with the flash in 2015
Argus: Autronic 35 camera  Argus: Autronic 351960-1962  199420.001960-1962 Good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Argus: Autronic II camera  Argus: Autronic II1962-1965  20158.001962-1965 Good condition worth $20.00 with the flash unit in 2015
Argus: DC1510 camera  Argus: DC15102002  200920.002003 New condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (0.1MP)
Argus: DC2200 camera  Argus: DC22002003  20095.002000 poor condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (0.3MP)
Argus: DC3200 camera  Argus: DC32002003  201010.002003 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (1.3MP)
Argus: M410 camera  Argus: M4101998  20155.001998 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Argus: M450 camera  Argus: M450c2004  20172.00The Argus M450 uses 35mm film and is a Point and Shoot rangefinder type film camera. It has a manually adjusted 35mm to 55mm aspherical zoom lens and the camera measures 5.25 inch wide, 3.5 inch high plus 2.62 inch deep. The M450 uses two x AA alkaline batteries to power its features. It also has Red Eye Reduction, auto built in flash, flash ready LED, optical viewfinder, ¼ inch 20 thread tripod mount, auto film load, auto frame advance, auto rewind, mid roll rewind via slid switch under the viewfinder eye piece, frame counter, and a handy carry strap. On the back of the camera is a decal with four easy steps to take when reloading film. The original package came with a roll of film, two alkaline batteries, instruction pamphlet, carry strap, and camera. The camera was made in China and was introduced in 2004.
Argus: M5700D camera  Argus: M5700Dc2001  20172.00This fully automatic 2001 camera has a built-in 3.6x or 38-135mm Japan made lens. All the controls for this camera are in the back cover including the power button. From left to right while looking at the back the buttons are Rewind, Mode, Timer, Date, power, and the zoom control. The mode button selects no flash, Red eye reduction, portrait, landscape, and night. On the top of the camera is the shutter button, the name of the camera (Argus M5700D), and printed in the center is “AUTO FOCUS/PROGRAMED EXPOSURE”. The view finder adjusts with the lens and a LED next to the eye piece indicates flash ready. On the bottom of the camera is the battery compartment that houses one CR123 3 volt lithium battery, the serial number, ¼ inch 20 thread tripod mount, and the words ”MADE IN CHINA” PRINTED IN THE CENTER. The camera also has auto film load, auto film advance, auto rewind, mid roll rewind, built in lens cover, built in flash, film view window, and a strap attach point. It is unclear if the camera was made by Argus or rebadged by Argus and the history of the Argus Company is vague during this period. The lens could be Canon, Minolta, or any number of Japanese companies. The Argus brand has been reestablished and is used on a variety of inexpensive digital cameras made by Argus Camera Company, LLC, located in Inverness, Illinois. But, the first cameras were made in 2009 and before that 1967. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Asahi: Pentax Auto 110 camera  Asahi: Pentax Auto 1101979-1983 201712.00The Pentax Auto 110 is a single-lens reflex camera made by Asahi Pentax that use Kodak's 110 film cartridge. The Auto 110 was introduced with three interchangeable lenses in 1978. Three more lenses were introduced in 1981, and then the Super model was released in 1982. The camera system was sold until 1985. The complete system is sometimes known as the Pentax System 10, apparently for its official Pentax name, although most Pentax advertising only uses the camera name or Pentax-110. This model represented the only complete ultraminiature SLR system manufactured for the 110 film format, although several fixed-lens 110 SLRs were sold. The camera system also claims to be the smallest interchangeable-lens SLR system ever created. The cameras and lenses were very small (the camera fits in the palm of a hand easily) and were made to professional SLR standards of quality. The camera was offered in a special edition "Safari" model, identical to the Auto 110 except for the brown-and-tan color scheme. The Pentax Auto 110 featured fully automatic exposure, with no user-settable exposure compensation or adjustments. Metering was TTL (through-the-lens) and center-weighted. Unlike 35 mm SLRs, the system's lenses did not have a built-in iris to control the aperture. Instead, an iris was mounted inside the camera body, and functioned as both an aperture control and a shutter. This mechanism was capable of programmed exposures between 1/750 of a second at f/13.5; and 1 second at F/2.8. Information found on Wikipedia. The camera pictured here in in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 115G camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 115G1996  200610.001996 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 115M camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 115M1996  20125.001996 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 115M camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 115M1996  20055.001996 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 120 camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 1201994  20167.501994 Poor condition and does not always turn on or work. For this reason the camera is worth $0.50 in parts in 2016.
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 170SL camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 170SL2001 20168.00The camera has an SMC Pentax power zoom 38mm to 170mm f/5.6 - f/12.8 lens with 8 elements in 6 groups. The focusing system uses phase-matching passive five-point autofocus system and Infinity landscape/Spot AF mode is available. The autofocusing Range is 2.45 ft. (0.75m) to infinity at 38mm and 3.9 ft. (1.2m) to infinity at 170mm. Exposure control is achieved with programmed auto exposure control and multi-segment metering. The metering range (1) Auto mode: (EV10 - EV17 (38mm at ISO400), EV14 – EV19 (170mm at ISO400)), and (2) Slow shutter Speed: (EV6 - EV17 (38mm at ISO400) EV6.5 – EV19 (170mm at ISO400)). The shutter is a programmed AE electronic lens shutter with shutter speeds of approximately 1/250 second to 2 seconds with 1/2 second to 1 minute in Bulb mode. The viewfinder is a standard/panorama switchable actual-image zoom viewfinder with slide lever diopter adjustment (approx. -3.0m-1 to +1.0m-1). The external LCD has exposure count, battery exhaustion warning, Infinity-landscape, Spot AF, red-eye reduction, flash-on, flash-off, slow-speed shutter, Bulb, self-timer and remote control. Film advance and film rewinding is automatic at the end of roll with automatic stop upon rewind completion, and it has mid-roll rewinding. Film-speed setting is automatic with DX-coded film from ISO25 to ISO3200. The camera also has a 10-second delay electronic self-timer, built-in auto zoom flash, automatic discharge in low light plus backlight conditions in auto mode, Flash-on/off modes, and dual discharge in red-eye reduction mode. Also optional infrared wireless remote control, 3-second delay release provided, automatic cut-off after approximately 3 minutes of non-use In remote control shooting mode, and automatic cut-off after approximately 5 minutes of non-use. The camera is powered by one 3V lithium battery (CR2 type) and the dimensions & Weight: 4.4 (W) × 2.4 (H) × 1.9 (D) inches (111.5 × 60.0 × 47.5mm). 7.1 oz. (200g)* without battery. The flash recycling time is approximately 5 seconds with fresh lithium battery. This camera was introduced in 2001 and the one pictured here is in Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2016.
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 60-X camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 60-X1987  199510.001987 Good condition worth 10.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 60R camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 60R1991  200310.001987 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 70 camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 701987  200910.001988-1991 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 70 XL camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 70 XL1994  201510.001994 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 90WR camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom 90WR1991  20095.001992-1993 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY1995  200910.001995-1998 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY1995  20155.001995-1998 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY1995  20150.001995-1998 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY-80 camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY-801996  201010.002002 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY-R camera  Asahi: Pentax IQ-Zoom EZY-R1998  200910.002003 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax K1000 camera  Asahi: Pentax K10001976-1997  200125.001976-1997 Fine condition worth $250.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax K1000 camera  Asahi: Pentax K10001976-1997  200115.001976-1997 good condition worth $70.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax K1000 camera  Asahi: Pentax K10001976-1997  201020.001976-1997 good condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax K1000 camera  Asahi: Pentax K10001976-1997  201515.001976-1997 good condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax K1000 camera  Asahi: Pentax K10001976-1997  201525.001976-1997 Good condition worth $150.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax K1000 camera  Asahi: Pentax K10001976-1997  201515.001976-1997 good condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax ME camera  Asahi: Pentax ME1976-1981  200535.001976-1990 Fine condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax ME SE camera  Asahi: Pentax ME SE1976-1981 201520.001976 Good condition worth $35.00 in 2015
Asahi: Pentax ME SE camera  Asahi: Pentax ME SE1976-1981  201520.001976 good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Asahi: Pentax PC 333 camera  Asahi: Pentax PC 3331986  20085.001986 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax PC 35 AF camera  Asahi: Pentax PC 35 AF1983  20095.001982 good condition worth $20.00 with film winder in 2014
Asahi: Pentax PC 35 AF camera  Asahi: Pentax PC 35 AF1983  201010.001982 poor condition worth $2.00 in 2014 (decaying foam seals)
Asahi: Pentax PC 550 camera  Asahi: Pentax PC 5501999  200910.001990 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax PC 550 Date camera  Asahi: Pentax PC 550 Date1999  201410.001990 New condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax S3 camera  Asahi: Pentax S31961  201617.001960 Good condition worth $50.00 in 2016
Asahi: Pentax Sport 35 Motor camera  Asahi: Pentax Sport 35 Motor1985  20095.001982 good condition worth $500 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax Super Program camera  Asahi: Pentax Super Program1983  200325.001983 Fine condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax Super Program camera  Asahi: Pentax Super Program1983  201622.001983 fine condition worth $70.00 with the lens in 2016
Asahi: Pentax Zoom 60 X camera  Asahi: Pentax Zoom 60 X1990  201310.001990 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax Zoom 70 R camera  Asahi: Pentax Zoom 70 Rc1991  20163.001991 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Asahi: Pentax Zoom 90 WR camera  Asahi: Pentax Zoom 90 WR1991  201310.001991 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax Zoom 90 WR camera  Asahi: Pentax Zoom 90 WR1991  201010.001991 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Asahi: Pentax ZX 10 silver camera  Asahi: Pentax ZX 10 silver1996-2000  201612.001996 fine condition worth $55.00 with a Sigma 28 to 200mm zoom lens in 2016
Asahi: Pentax ZX 50 camera  Asahi: Pentax ZX 501997-2000  20145.001997 Poor condition worth $2.00 for parts in 2014
Asanuma Trading: Torel 110 'National' camera  Asanuma Trading: Torel 110 'National'c1985  201612.00This camera was manufactured by Asanuma Trading & Co Ltd from Japan and introduced in 1985. It was an all plastic (other than screws and shutter assembly) gimmick type camera that had representations of almost every countries flag printed on its face. The size of it is 68x34x32mm and it weighs 30g without film. The camera is shorter than the 110 film it holds because half the film cartridge is exposed. It has an f/8 aperture and 1/80 of a second shutter speed. The viewfinder is a plastic fold down rectangle with a pointer at the top center. The shutter button is in the back of the camera and is pressed with the right thumb. The film advance wheel is accessed at the front right side and is used with the right hand index finger. The camera also has a cutout in the back that is used to keep track of frame numbers on the back of the film. The camera has no flash or any way of attaching one. This is a strictly outdoor camera. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Balda: Baldax camera  Balda: Baldax1936-1940s  20155.001936-1940 poor condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Balda: Baldessa Ib camera  Balda: Baldessa Ib1958  200110.001953 good condition worth $65.00 in 2014
Beier: Beirette (1965) camera  Beier: Beirette (1965)1965  201615.001958 Poor condition worth $3.00 in 2016
Bell & Howell: 250 camera  Bell & Howell: 250c1989  20132.001989 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Bell & Howell: 985D camera  Bell & Howell: 985Dc2000  20135.002000 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Bell & Howell: 985D camera  Bell & Howell: 985Dc2000  20155.002000 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Bell & Howell: BF 35 camera  Bell & Howell: BF 35  20174.50The Bell + Howell BF35 is a simple fixed-focus 35mm viewfinder camera, released by Bell and Howell, early 2000’s. It has a 35mm f/7.7 lens, and a fixed shutter speed of 1/100 second. It has an old style two contact hot shoe and a built-in sliding lens cover that locks the shutter button when closed. It also comes with a frame counter, fold down rewind crank handle, rewind release button on the bottom of the camera, film view window in the back cover, large viewfinder, focus range of 4 foot to infinity, right thumb film advance wheel, and when new comes with an instruction pamphlet, warranty card, plus handy wrist strap. On the original box you will find “Made in China” and a SKU # L758. The camera works best with ISO 200 to 400 film but can use whatever you put in it with varying results. The camera pictured here is in new condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Bell & Howell: BF 608 camera  Bell & Howell: BF 6081993  20153.001993 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Bell & Howell: BF 905 camera  Bell & Howell: BF 9051998  20084.001998 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Bell & Howell: BH23 camera  Bell & Howell: BH232003  20140.002003 good condition worth $2.00 in 2014 (640 X 480 Digital)
Bell & Howell: BV 906 SVD camera  Bell & Howell: BV 906 SVD1998  20055.001998 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Bell & Howell: EZ35 Autofocus camera  Bell & Howell: EZ35 Autofocus  20174.00This is the later Bell and Howell EZ35 which was auto focus. They were both produced by Haking and made in Hong Kong, plus they have similarities with other cameras from that company in that period. The 38mm f3.8 lens is slightly wide angle for that format (normal 43.5mm). The thumb wheel advance and built in flash on the older camera suggest it was made around 1980 whereas the autofocus model is fully automatic and released about 1982. The camera has settings to accommodate ASA 50, 100, 200, and ASA 400 film. The older model has a fixed flash unit and the newer model is pop-up with an on/off switch in the front under the flash unit. Both cameras work with two alkaline AA batteries. The automatic model uses the flash before the shutter to indicate the frame is in focus and a red light in the viewfinder to indicate a need for the pop-up flash or low light condition. The camera has the EAF (Easy Automatic Focus) System, an optical viewfinder, frame counter, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount. It does not have mid-roll rewind nor any adjustments other than ASA settings. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Bell & Howell: F3-5 camera  Bell & Howell: F3-51997  20023.001997 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Bell & Howell: Focus Free camera  Bell & Howell: Focus Freec2000  20131.001985 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (1 of 2)
Bell & Howell: Focus Free camera  Bell & Howell: Focus Freec2000  20152.001985 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Bell & Howell: Power Zoom 1000 camera  Bell & Howell: Power Zoom 10001995  20164.001995 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Bell & Howell: PZ1050 camera  Bell & Howell: PZ10501995  19998.001995 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Bell & Howell: PZ2000 camera  Bell & Howell: PZ20001999  200910.001999 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Belomo Minsk: Vilia camera  Belomo Minsk: Viliac1974  20155.001973-1986 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Bilora (Kürbi & Niggeloh): Bella 55 camera  Bilora (Kürbi & Niggeloh): Bella 55c1955  20158.001955 good condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Bilora (Kürbi & Niggeloh): Stahl-Box (1952) camera  Bilora (Kürbi & Niggeloh): Stahl-Box (1952)c1952 20176.00Cameras were produced from 1935 in Radevormwald. From the first "Box" to the "Bilomatic" line and the fabrication stopped in 1975. Imagine, in 21 years there were more than one million cameras produced. In later years, the Bilora brand was used for camera accessories, particularly tripods. The Bilora Stahl-Box camera was manufactured by the Kurbi & Niggeloh Company of Radevormwald/RHLD, Germany in circa 1952. This box camera is constructed of metal with an art deco etched face plate. It is capable of capturing 6 X 9 cm exposures on no. 120 roll film. It was fitted with a fixed focus Meniscus lens and a simple B & M shutter with two settings of I for instant plus B for bulb. It also has two brilliant viewfinders for portrait and landscape. A flash attachment could be fitted using the double hole receptacle on the top. The camera measures 4 1/2 x 3 /18 x 4 1/2 inches. The Stahl Box camera is also known by the name Wardette made by Bilora for Montgomery Ward. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Bolsey: Bolsey B2 camera  Bolsey: Bolsey B2c1949-1956  201510.001949-1956 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Braun Carl: Handy BF camera  Braun Carl: Handy BFc1980s 20158.001997 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Bushnell: Imageview (1.3) camera  Bushnell: Imageview (1.3)2003  200715.002003 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (1.3MP) Binocular camera
Bushnell: Imageview (1.3) camera  Bushnell: Imageview (1.3)2003  20155.002003 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (1.3MP) Binocular camera
Canon: Aqua Snappy (AS-6 / Acty) camera  Canon: Aqua Snappy (AS-6 / Acty)1986  20160.10Although the AS-6 was part of Canon's low-cost Snappy series, it has retained cult appeal due to it being capable of shooting up to 10m (32.8 feet) underwater. This 35mm model has a fixed focus 35mm f/4.5 lens, program auto exposure, and motorized film transport. It has DX coding for ISO 100 or 400 film and uses 2 AAA batteries. The camera came with a cowing that surrounded the flash, viewfinder, and lens with a spot for mounting a large underwater viewfinder and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount. It also has a shutter lock slide switch, frame counter, flash on/off switch, flash ready light near the optical viewfinder, and a handy carry strap with the lens cap attached. The camera was introduced by Canon in 1986 and at the time of this blurb Amazon still sold it used for $59.99. The camera pictured here must have went 11 meters under water because it is full of salt. For this reason it is listed in POOR condition and worth $.50 for parts in 2016.
Canon: Canon AE-1 camera  Canon: Canon AE-11976-1984  201470.001976-1984 fine condition worth $150.00 in 2014
Canon: Canon AE-1 camera  Canon: Canon AE-11976-1984  201225.001976-1984 poor condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Canon: Canon AE-1 camera  Canon: Canon AE-11976-1984  201410.001976-1984 Poor condition worth $15.00 for parts in 2014
Canon: Canon AE-1 camera  Canon: Canon AE-11976-1984  201520.001976-1984 good condition worth $35.00 in 2015
Canon: Canon AE-1 camera  Canon: Canon AE-11976-1984  201550.001976-1984 Good condition worth $50.00 in 2015
Canon: Canon AE-1 program camera  Canon: Canon AE-1 programc1981  201515.001981-1984 Poor condition worth $10.00 for parts in 2014
Canon: Canon AE-1 program camera  Canon: Canon AE-1 programc1981  200430.001981-1984 Good condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Canon: Canon AE-1 program camera  Canon: Canon AE-1 programc1981  1985250.001981-1984 Good condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Canon: Canon AE-1 program camera  Canon: Canon AE-1 programc1981  201522.001981-1984 Fine condition worth $150.00 in 2014 ( Power winder A2)( Data Back A)
Canon: Canon AE-1 program camera  Canon: Canon AE-1 programc1981  201620.001981-1984 Good condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Canon: Canon AV-1 camera  Canon: Canon AV-11979  201635.001979 fine condition worth $40.00 in 2016
Canon: Canon FT QL camera  Canon: Canon FT QL1966-1972  20168.001966 Poor condition but worth $40.00 with the lens in 2016
Canon: Canon T50 (Canon T5) camera  Canon: Canon T50 (Canon T5)1983 201030.001983-1989 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Canon: Canon T50 (Canon T5) camera  Canon: Canon T50 (Canon T5)1983 199545.001983-1989 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Canon: Canon T50 (Canon T5) camera  Canon: Canon T50 (Canon T5)1983 201515.001983-1989 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Canon: Canon T70 camera  Canon: Canon T701984  20165.00The Canon T70 was a 35mm FD-mount single-lens reflex camera introduced in April 1984 as the second in Canon's T series. The T70 started with the concepts explored in 1983's T50, took them further, and applied them to a more sophisticated camera. While the Program AE-only T50 was intended as a beginner's camera, the T70 gave the photographer a lot more control over the camera's operation while keeping the T-series philosophy of simplicity in control and operation intact. All film transport on the T70 was powered—loading, advance and rewind. The continuous shooting rate, at 0.7 frames per second, was slower than rival motor drives, but the drive was nonetheless faster than most people could manually wind. To load the camera, the photographer simply had to pull the film leader out to an orange mark and close the back—the camera did the rest, loading the leader onto the spool, and advancing to the first frame automatically. All powered camera functions drew on two AA batteries in the grip. A built-in lithium battery (BR-1225 or CR-1220) was used to store user settings; the batteries lasted for about five years, and had to be replaced by a technician, since replacing them required partial dismantling of the camera body. The T70 used an LCD mounted on the top of the right-hand side of the camera as a major component of its user interface. Two buttons above the display labelled 'UP' and 'DOWN' adjusted the selected parameter and the results were shown on the LCD. Buttons on the left-hand top of the camera selected the parameter to be modified. The T70 included two different through-the-lens metering methods; both used a silicon photocell housed above the viewfinder eyepiece. Center-weighted average metering was the standard metering method, averaging over the whole frame with a slight preference towards the center of the frame, where the main subject is most likely to be. With strongly backlit scenes, or ones where the subject is spotlit against a dark background, center-weighted averaging produces underexposure or overexposure, respectively. For such situations, the T70 also supported selective area metering, which metered only the center 11% of the frame. The metering mode was selected by a sliding switch on the top left-hand side of the camera (from the photographer's perspective). This switch also selected self-timer mode and had a Lock position. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $25.00 in 2016. It has a Canon FD 28-55mm f3.5-4.5 lens worth $35.00 for a total of $60.00. (Info from Wikipedia)
Canon: Canon T70 camera  Canon: Canon T701984  20165.00The Canon T70 was a 35mm FD-mount single-lens reflex camera introduced in April 1984 as the second in Canon's T series. The T70 started with the concepts explored in 1983's T50, took them further, and applied them to a more sophisticated camera. While the Program AE-only T50 was intended as a beginner's camera, the T70 gave the photographer a lot more control over the camera's operation while keeping the T-series philosophy of simplicity in control and operation intact. All film transport on the T70 was powered—loading, advance and rewind. The continuous shooting rate, at 0.7 frames per second, was slower than rival motor drives, but the drive was nonetheless faster than most people could manually wind. To load the camera, the photographer simply had to pull the film leader out to an orange mark and close the back—the camera did the rest, loading the leader onto the spool, and advancing to the first frame automatically. All powered camera functions drew on two AA batteries in the grip. A built-in lithium battery (BR-1225 or CR-1220) was used to store user settings; the batteries lasted for about five years, and had to be replaced by a technician, since replacing them required partial dismantling of the camera body. The T70 used an LCD mounted on the top of the right-hand side of the camera as a major component of its user interface. Two buttons above the display labelled 'UP' and 'DOWN' adjusted the selected parameter and the results were shown on the LCD. Buttons on the left-hand top of the camera selected the parameter to be modified. The T70 included two different through-the-lens metering methods; both used a silicon photocell housed above the viewfinder eyepiece. Center-weighted average metering was the standard metering method, averaging over the whole frame with a slight preference towards the center of the frame, where the main subject is most likely to be. With strongly backlit scenes, or ones where the subject is spotlit against a dark background, center-weighted averaging produces underexposure or overexposure, respectively. For such situations, the T70 also supported selective area metering, which metered only the center 11% of the frame. The metering mode was selected by a sliding switch on the top left-hand side of the camera (from the photographer's perspective). This switch also selected self-timer mode and had a Lock position. The camera pictured here is Poor condition due to missing parts in the battery compartment. For this reason this camera is worth $5.00 for parts in 2016. (Most of the Info above is from Wikipedia)
Canon: Canon TLb camera  Canon: Canon TLb1974-1976 201722.00The Canon TLb is a 35 mm single-lens reflex camera introduced in the Americas by Canon in September 1974 and discontinued in 1976. It features a Canon FD lens mount, and is also compatible with Canon's earlier FL-mount lenses in stop-down metering mode. The TLb was a cheaper version of the Canon FTb for the export market, as was the slightly later TX. Compared to the TX, the hot shoe was omitted, although the camera included a PC terminal for flash sync and with a maximum shutter speed of 1/500s in place of the FTb's 1/1000s. It has TTL metering using a CdS cell, powered by a 1.35V HD mercury battery. The TLb was later (April 1976) sold in Japan. The shutter is a two-axis, horizontal-travel focal-plane shutter with cloth curtains. The speeds are X, B, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500 of a second with no self-timer. The film speed range is ISO 25 to 2000 and film frame counter ends at 40. The camera was known as the Canon TLb in America, Japan, Europe, Asia, and Oceania. The camera also has a fold down rewind crank handle that when pulled up releases the back cover, thumb lever single action film advance, fixed eye-level pentaprism viewfinder, rewind release button, and two hard points for a strap. This camera has a Kiron Macro 70-210mm f/4.5 manual focus lens with a minimum aperture of f/32 with 6 blades. This zoom lens was produced for all major SLR camera brands and in fine condition worth $25.00. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $45.00 for a total of $70.00 in 2017.
Canon: Canon TX camera  Canon: Canon TX1975-1979  201115.001975-1979 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: Canonet 19 Bell & Howell camera  Canon: Canonet 19 Bell & Howell1961-1965  199010.001961-1965 poor working condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Canon: Canonet 28 (1971) camera  Canon: Canonet 28 (1971)1971  200120.001971-1976 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: Canonet 28 Bell & Howell camera  Canon: Canonet 28 Bell & Howell1968  201610.00The original Canon Canonet 28 viewfinder camera was launched in 1968. The lens is a fixed 40mm f/2.8 Canon lens. It has fully programmed auto exposure with shutter speeds from 1/30 to 1/600 (shown by the meter's needle in the viewfinder), and manual control of f-stops for flash (f2.8-f16). The film speed range for auto exposure is from 25 to 400 ASA. It uses a Copal leaf shutter and has a coupled rangefinder. It was made in Taiwan. The Bell & Howell Canonet 28 is more like the original Canonet launched in 1961. It has a flash socket but no hot shoe but has a right thumb film advance lever like the later models. This camera was made in Japan by Canon and has a Seikosha-L shutter. It was capable of using film from 10 to 200 ASA and it too used a Canon SE 40mm f2.8 lens. The year made was somewhere between 1961 and 1962. It also has a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, 1/30 to 1/250 of a second shutter, 3 feet to infinity focus range, easy load film method, rewind slid switch, fold down rewind crank that releases the film when pulled up, pull down back cover release, optical viewfinder with meter readings inside, and a hard point for a carry strap. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition with a bad shutter. For this reason it is worth $5.00 in parts in 2016.
Canon: Canonet G III QL17 camera  Canon: Canonet G III QL171972  201525.001972 fine condition worth $75.00 in 2015
Canon: Canonet QL 19 camera  Canon: Canonet QL 191965  199510.001965 Poor working condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Canon: Dial 35 I camera  Canon: Dial 35 I1963-1967  200210.001965 Poor working condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: Dial 35 II camera  Canon: Dial 35 II1968-1971 201715.00The eye-catching Dial 35 (1963 to 1967) and Dial 35-2 (1968 to 1971) had unique user-appeal and makes a good conversation piece. Half-frame cameras were in vogue in the early-to-mid 1960’s and were then predicted to supersede full-frame 35mm. Canon’s imaginative design offered motorized film transport and landscape format orientation as well as automatic exposure. But the Dial 35’s landmark features were more for show than go. The telephone-style ‘dial’ rotated when either the shutter speed (1/30 of a second to 1/250 of a second) or the film speed was set by the user, positioning one or other dial ‘lens’ (each had a different internal aperture) over the CDS cell. These adjustments were in full-stop increments only, intermediate film speed settings could not be made. Although the dial looked intriguing it was impractical. The ASA markings were too vague and obscure. Films between ‘ranges’ - 40, 100, 180 or 320 ASA – would have to have been half a stop over- or under-exposed throughout. The 49mm filter mount allowed filters to cover the whole dial and meter cell. Aperture setting was automatic, f-stops shown in the bright-frame viewfinder, with a manual override facility. The 28mm, 5-element f2.8 lens gave a useful field of view equivalent to 40mm on full-frame. Depth of field was thought sufficient for zone-focusing only, which was effected with a lever above the lens barrel, the zone being indicated in the viewfinder. The clockwork motor, which also rewound the film, was wound up by turning the cylindrical handle, grip provided by a ribbed rubber surround. An accessory shoe was inset at the side of the body. A tripod and cable-release sockets were provided, but no “B” shutter setting. The Dial 35, with its quality lens and reliable automatic exposure produced good results. The film transport mechanism is a weak point, and examples still in working order are unusual. The necessity of motor wind in a snapshot camera is debatable, it did lead to more shots being taken, an indirect benefit perhaps with half-frame, which needed up to 75 exposures to finish up a roll of film. The Dial 35-2 camera had an improved clockwork motor and a hot-shoe and was marketed in the USA as a Bell and Howell Dial 35 (1967 to 1972). The camera pictured here is in Poor condition because the shutter does not work. For this reason it is worth $3.00 for parts in 2017.
Canon: Elph LT260 (Ixus Z50 / IXY 220) camera  Canon: Elph LT260 (Ixus Z50 / IXY 220)2000  199918.001996-2000 Good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Canon: Elph LT260 (Ixus Z50 / IXY 220) camera  Canon: Elph LT260 (Ixus Z50 / IXY 220)2000  200510.001996-2000 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Canon: Elph LT260 (Ixus Z50 / IXY 220) camera  Canon: Elph LT260 (Ixus Z50 / IXY 220)2000  200610.001996-2000 poor condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (missing battery cover)
Canon: Elph LT260 (Ixus Z50 / IXY 220) camera  Canon: Elph LT260 (Ixus Z50 / IXY 220)2000  20167.002000 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Canon: Elph Sport (Ixus X-1 / IXY D5) camera  Canon: Elph Sport (Ixus X-1 / IXY D5)1999  201010.002000 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: Elph Z3 (Ixus III / IXY i) camera  Canon: Elph Z3 (Ixus III / IXY i)2002  200012.001997-2002 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: Elph Z3 (Ixus III / IXY i) camera  Canon: Elph Z3 (Ixus III / IXY i)2002  200815.001997-2002 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Canon: EOS 1000 (EOS Rebel) camera  Canon: EOS 1000 (EOS Rebel)1990  201520.001993 Fine condition worth $30.00 in 2015
Canon: EOS 1000D (EOS Rebel XS / Kiss F Digital) camera  Canon: EOS 1000D (EOS Rebel XS / Kiss F Digital)2008  20165.00The Canon EOS Rebel XS is a full featured, lightweight and easy to use autofocus SLR with a built-in pop-up flash. When introduced it set new standards for a full-featured yet compact and light autofocus SLR. Time has proven the Rebel XS to be a very reliable camera as well. The Rebel XS is compatible with the full line of Canon EF lenses. Introduced in 1993 it had 11 shooting modes full auto, 5 picture modes plus 5 creative control modes and delivers exceptional results in any situation. Choose from auto or manual focus depending on the composition. It also has E-TTL auto flash, large ¾” by 1 ½” LCD operations display and fully digital viewfinder display. The camera uses two CR123A batteries to power up the features and auto focus lenses. The camera pictured above is in fine condition and worth $25.00 in 2016.
Canon: EOS 1000F (EOS Rebel S) camera  Canon: EOS 1000F (EOS Rebel S)1990  200112.001992 fine condition worth $120.00 in 2014
Canon: EOS 1000FN (EOS 1000 S / EOS Rebel SII) QD camera  Canon: EOS 1000FN (EOS 1000 S / EOS Rebel SII) QD1992  200915.001992 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Canon: EOS 300 (EOS Rebel 2000 / EOS Kiss III) camera  Canon: EOS 300 (EOS Rebel 2000 / EOS Kiss III)1999  201215.001999-2002 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Canon: EOS 300 (EOS Rebel 2000 / EOS Kiss III) camera  Canon: EOS 300 (EOS Rebel 2000 / EOS Kiss III)1999  200920.001999-2002 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Canon: EOS 300 (EOS Rebel 2000 / EOS Kiss III) camera  Canon: EOS 300 (EOS Rebel 2000 / EOS Kiss III)1999  201615.00The Canon EOS 300 (EOS Kiss III in Japan, EOS Rebel 2000 in North America) is a consumer-level 35mm single-lens reflex camera, produced by Canon of Japan from April 1999 until September 2002 as part of their EOS system. Designed under the supervision of Yasuhiro Morishita, the camera was intended as a replacement for the Canon EOS 500N. The camera was a success for Canon, selling exceedingly well and dominating its market sector until it was replaced by the EOS 300V (Rebel Ti, Kiss 5). Canon EOS 300 won European Imaging and Sound Association Award 1999-2000. Like other low-priced SLRs of the time, the EOS 300 used a Penta mirror viewfinder instead of a pentaprism, and had a polycarbonate body. The autofocus capabilities of this camera were identical to Canon's much more expensive Elan 7 with six single-line CMOS sensors surrounding a central cross-type sensor. The EOS 300 should not be confused with the later Canon EOS 300D (EOS Digital Rebel in the US and EOS Kiss Digital in Japan), a popular entry-level digital SLR from 2003. This camera has a 35-80mm Canon EF Zoom lens fitted to it worth $35.00 in 2016. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $35.00 in 2016 for a total of $70.00.
Canon: EOS 3000V (EOS Rebel K2 / EOS Kiss Lite) camera  Canon: EOS 3000V (EOS Rebel K2 / EOS Kiss Lite)2003  201025.002003 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Canon: EOS 3000V (EOS Rebel K2 / EOS Kiss Lite) camera  Canon: EOS 3000V (EOS Rebel K2 / EOS Kiss Lite)2003  2003400.002003 Fine condition worth $80.00 with lens in 2014
Canon: EOS 500 (EOS Rebel XS / EOS Kiss) camera  Canon: EOS 500 (EOS Rebel XS / EOS Kiss)1993  201610.001993 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Canon: EOS 500 N (EOS Rebel G / EOS New Kiss) camera  Canon: EOS 500 N (EOS Rebel G / EOS New Kiss)1996  201220.001996 Fine condition worth $50.00 in 2014
Canon: EOS 500D (EOS Rebel T1i / EOS Kiss X3) camera  Canon: EOS 500D (EOS Rebel T1i / EOS Kiss X3)2009  2008649.002008 Fine condition worth $240.00 in 2015 (Body only)(15.1MP)
Canon: EOS 620 camera  Canon: EOS 6201987  20165.00The EOS 620, marketed in May, 1987 - was introduced barely a few months after the debut of the Canon EOS 650 in March, 1987. Unlike the 650, the 620 was promoted as a camera with a higher technical specification; its shutter was designed to meet the needs of the mid- to top-level amateur, with the camera primarily aimed to assist both levels of photographers. Basically, it carries more technical specifications than the entry level EOS650. Its sales targets were mid-level and advanced amateur photographers but Canon did use the EOS 620 as a promotional tool to entice professional photographers at major sporting events in trying out the EOS System, an effort that went well until the 1988 Summer Olympics Games in Seoul. The EOS 620 was replaced two years after introduction in 1989 with the EOS 630 camera. Despite its relatively short appearance (for an analog SLR), the EOS 620 does have followers in the used market for a while as it has a higher sync speed of 1/250 second, a stop faster than what the EOS 630 has! Incidentally, the Canon EOS 620 was also the first EOS camera model that employed the Programmed Shift Function and an integrated Auto-Bracketing Control. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $25.00 in 2016.
Canon: EOS 750 camera  Canon: EOS 7501988  20165.00The EOS 750 and EOS 750QD are autofocus SLRs for 35mm film introduced by Canon in 1988 and discontinued in 1990. The QD version is able to imprint dates through 2019 onto the film. Both 750's were a very simplified EOS models, primarily meant to use programmed auto exposure, with no manual alternative. Film handling is motorized, and the camera requires a 6-volt lithium 2CR5 battery to operate. (The date back requires its own separate CR2025 "coin" type battery.) A special "depth of field" metering mode is coupled with the (single) autofocus sensor: By half-pressing on the shutter release, the photographer selects two areas of the scene which are both meant to be in focus. The camera then determines the optimum focus distance, and stops down the lens to a sufficiently small aperture to achieve this. There's an elegant simplicity to the operation of this entry EOS model; the photographer simply sets the selector dial and presses the shutter release. The smooth EOS contours fit the camera snugly in the hand, with the selector dial and shutter release right at the fingertips for responsive operation. Along with the EOS 850, both series has an innovative pre-wind film advance mode in which all of the film was wound forward when the camera was loaded and then rewound back into the cassette one frame at a time as the photos are taken. The camera was replaced with Canon EOS 700 in 1990. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $35.00 in 2016.
Canon: EOS Rebel X camera  Canon: EOS Rebel X1993  201011.001993 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2) camera  Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2)1984  20145.001983 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2) camera  Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2)1984  201310.001983 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2) camera  Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2)1984  199415.001983 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2) camera  Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2)1984  20158.001983 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2) camera  Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2)1984  20155.001983 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts in 2015 (no response)
Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2) camera  Canon: New Sure Shot (AF35M II / Autoboy 2)1984  20163.501990 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Canon: New Sure Shot (Prima Twin / Autoboy WT28) camera  Canon: New Sure Shot (Prima Twin / Autoboy WT28)1990  19988.001990 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Canon: PowerShot A300 camera  Canon: PowerShot A3002003  20155.002003 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2015 (3.2MP)
Canon: PowerShot A410 camera  Canon: PowerShot A4102005  20155.002007 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (3.2MP)
Canon: PowerShot A540 camera  Canon: PowerShot A5402006  201615.002006 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016 (6.0MP)
Canon: PowerShot SX160 IS camera  Canon: PowerShot SX160 IS2012  201520.002012 fine condition worth $100.00 in 2015 (16.0MP)
Canon: Snappy 20 camera  Canon: Snappy 201982  20155.001982 Poor working condition worth $0.50 in 2015
Canon: Snappy 50 camera  Canon: Snappy 501982  20165.001982 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Canon: Snappy AF camera  Canon: Snappy AF1989  20165.00Based on the Canon Autoboy Lite 2, this is a fully automatic camera which uses a near-infrared beam for autofocus. It was developed for overseas markets and only released in the America’s in October of 1989. Canon produced this camera for export only and did not release this camera anywhere else. The camera features a 35mm f/4.5 lens, SPC for full auto program EE, and a built-in flash. The electronically-controlled flash fires automatically in low light. The camera has a 35mm f/4.5 (3 elements in 3 groups) lens, electronic programmed shutter plus aperture, Built-in electronic self-timer, built in lens cover, reversed Galilean viewfinder with image-area frame, 0.42x magnification with 85% coverage, EV 10 (f/4.5 at 1/40 sec.) - EV 17 (f/32 at 1/125 sec.) metering, ISO 50 - 1600 (with DX code) film speed range, fixed built-in flash that fires automatically in low-light conditions, and is powered by one 6V 2CR5 lithium battery. The camera also has automatic film advance (0.6 sec. per frame) plus rewind. The dimensions are 139mm x 72mm x 46mm and it weighs 275 grams. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Canon: Snappy K camera  Canon: Snappy K1988  20122.001988 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Canon: Snappy LX (Prima BF / BF35) camera  Canon: Snappy LX (Prima BF / BF35)1992 201610.00The Canon Snappy LX (Prima BF in Europe, BF 35 in Japan) of March 1992 was a 35mm compact camera for budget-conscious photographers, and was part of the Canon Snappy series. It was the first fixed focus compact to have a red-eye reduction feature. An auto date model was issued in 1994 that was named the Snappy LX/Date (America), BF35 QDN (Japan), and Prima BF-7/Date (Europe). The Snappy is a fully automatic compact camera with a large viewfinder, built-in flash, and a single focal length lens. The two-shot self-timer also lets you take two consecutive shots with a single self-timer operation. It has a 35mm, f/4.5 (3 elements in 3 groups) lens, three automatic shutter speeds: 1/45s, 1/60s, 1/250s, Integrated auto-flash (10m at ISO 100), DX-decoding of ISO film speeds 100-200/400, and a motor drive with auto advance and rewind. The camera is powered by two 1.5V AA alkaline batteries and sold for a suggested retail price of about $169.00 in the US. Other features were a built in flash, ¼’ 20 thread tripod mount, built in lens cover, and a handy carry strap. The series started in 1982 with the Snappy 20 and Snappy 50. Then came the Snappy S (1985), Aqua Snappy (1986), Snappy EZ (1988), Snappy K (1988), Snappy V (1989), Snappy AF (1989), Snappy Q (1989), Snappy EL (1992), Snappy LX (1992), Snappy CX (1993), Snappy LX/Date (1994), New Snappy EL (1995), Snappy QT/Date (1997), and lastly the Snappy LXII/Date (1998). Note that these all had different names in Europe and Japan. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $18.00 in 2016.
Canon: Snappy LX (Prima BF / BF35) camera  Canon: Snappy LX (Prima BF / BF35)1992 20165.001994 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Canon: Snappy LX (Prima BF / BF35) camera  Canon: Snappy LX (Prima BF / BF35)1992 20173.00The Canon Snappy LX (Prima BF in Europe, BF 35 in Japan) of March 1992 was a 35mm compact camera for budget-conscious photographers, and was part of the Canon Snappy series. It was the first fixed focus compact to have a red-eye reduction feature. An auto date model was issued in 1994 that was named the Snappy LX/Date (America), BF35 QDN (Japan), and Prima BF-7/Date (Europe). The Snappy is a fully automatic compact camera with a large viewfinder, built-in flash, and a single focal length lens. The two-shot self-timer also lets you take two consecutive shots with a single self-timer operation. It has a 35mm, f/4.5 (3 elements in 3 groups) lens, three automatic shutter speeds: 1/45s, 1/60s, 1/250s, Integrated auto-flash (10m at ISO 100), DX-decoding of ISO film speeds 100-200/400, and a motor drive with auto advance and rewind. The camera is powered by two 1.5V AA alkaline batteries and sold for a suggested retail price of about $169.00 in the US. Other features were a built in flash, ¼’ 20 thread tripod mount, built in lens cover, and a handy carry strap. The series started in 1982 with the Snappy 20 and Snappy 50. Then came the Snappy S (1985), Aqua Snappy (1986), Snappy EZ (1988), Snappy K (1988), Snappy V (1989), Snappy AF (1989), Snappy Q (1989), Snappy EL (1992), Snappy LX (1992), Snappy CX (1993), Snappy LX/Date (1994), New Snappy EL (1995), Snappy QT/Date (1997), and lastly the Snappy LXII/Date (1998). Note that these all had different names in Europe and Japan. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Canon: Snappy LX II (Prima BF-8 / BF35D) Date camera  Canon: Snappy LX II (Prima BF-8 / BF35D) Date1998 20174.00"BF" stands for "Big Finder". Known as the "Snappy LX II Date" in America, the "Prima BF-8 Date" in Europe and as "BF35D" in Japan. They are a 35mm single focal length compact camera featuring an extra-large, easy-to-see viewfinder and introduced in 1998. The model’s large viewfinder offers three times the viewing area found in conventional compact cameras, allowing subjects to be seen with greater ease and clarity. The feature even enables users to take pictures while wearing eyeglasses as the entire image area can be viewed up to a distance of two centimeters from the viewfinder. A Mode Dial, located on the face of the camera, consolidates all of the operation functions at the user’s fingertips. The camera has a stylishly designed sleek black body and features the Canon logo in raised silver letters. This is the sixth model of the Canon BF (Big Finder) series, the first of which was launched in 1991. Cumulative production of the BF series has already surpassed the 10-million unit mark in July, 1998. The camera produces a picture Size of 24 x 36mm and has a 35mm f/4.5 lens, 3 elements in 3 groups. It also has a Program-type electromagnetic shutter with aperture, electronically controlled, 10-second time delay self-timer, reverse Galileo type viewfinder, OK-to-shoot green LED indicator (located on right side of viewfinder), program AE using CdS light receptor element, metering range EV10 to EV16, ISO 100/200, 400 (Set automatically with DX-coded film) film speed range, Built-in Flash, Red-Eye Reduction feature, Flash ON mode, Flash OFF mode, auto film advance, auto rewind, mid-roll rewind, frame counter, and a ¼” 20 thread per inch tripod socket. The camera is powered by two AA-size Alkaline batteries (enables shooting approximate 50 rolls of 24-exposure film with 50% flash use) (Not compatible with Ni-Cd or lithium batteries). The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Canon: Snappy S (S-30FF) camera  Canon: Snappy S (S-30FF)1985  20012.001985 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Canon: Sprint (AF35J / Autoboy Lite) camera  Canon: Sprint (AF35J / Autoboy Lite)1985 201710.00The fourth model in Canon's Sure Shot series, released in July 1985, this autofocus compact camera was variously known as the Sprint in the US, AF35J (Jet) In Europe and Autoboy LITE in Japan. It was available in cranberry red or black. The lens is a 35mm, f/3.5. (3 elements in 3 groups). It also has an auto-exposure shutter with speeds from 1/40 of a second to 1/250 of a second and apertures from f/3.5 to f/11. The camera is capable of shooting film speeds of ISO 100 or 400 via DX coding. It also has features like integrated flash with manual controls, flash ready light, auto motorized film advance plus rewind, built in lens cover that seconds as an on/off switch, frame counter, and is powered two 1.5V AAA batteries. The size and weight is 123x68x45mm and 250g (with batteries). Printed on the bottom of the camera is “Canon Made in Taiwan R.O.C. (Republic of China)”. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Canon: Super Sure Shot (AF35ML / Autoboy Super) camera  Canon: Super Sure Shot (AF35ML / Autoboy Super)1981 1990 199010.001979 Good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Canon: Super Sure Shot (AF35ML / Autoboy Super) camera  Canon: Super Sure Shot (AF35ML / Autoboy Super)1981  20177.00The camera was known as AF35ML (Autoboy Super) in Japan, AF35ML in Europe and the US and also the Super Sure Shot in the Americas. They released the Quartz Date versions at the same time and added the QD at the end of the name but in the Americas they renamed it the Super Sure Shot. The camera was marketed in July of 1981 for an original price of $425 (47,800 yen). This fully automatic camera’s AF system uses a linear CCD array for triangulation. Nicknamed “Autoboy Super,” the camera has a fast 40mm f/1.9 (5 elements in 5 groups) lens. The electronic shutter was made by Canon and program-controlled. The reverse Galilean viewfinder features projected frame lines with automatic parallax correction. An LED lights when focus is achieved. Pictographs for near-, medium-, and far-distance subjects are also provided. An electronic beeper sounds for camera-shake warning, self-timer operation, and end-of-film alert. The beeper tone is different for each type of audio alert. AF35ML Quartz Date (released in September 1983) was a Canon AF35ML with a date imprinting feature on the camera back. It also cost $45 (5,000 yen) more. It also has a built in manual pop-up flash, power film advance, power rewind, self-timer, continuous shooting at 1 fps, and it is powered by two AA 1.5V batteries. Information from Canon Camera Museum. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Canon: Sure Shot (AF35M / Autoboy) camera  Canon: Sure Shot (AF35M / Autoboy)1979  20155.001979 fine condition worth $ 25.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot (AF35M / Autoboy) camera  Canon: Sure Shot (AF35M / Autoboy)1979  201510.001979 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot 105 Zoom (Prima Super 105 / Autoboy Luna 105) camera  Canon: Sure Shot 105 Zoom (Prima Super 105 / Autoboy Luna 105)1997  20145.001997 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot 150u (Prima Super 150u / Autoboy N150) camera  Canon: Sure Shot 150u (Prima Super 150u / Autoboy N150)2004  20173.50The Sure Shot 150u was marketed in 2004 plus it is known as the Autoboy N150 in Japan and the Prima Super 150u in Europe. The camera has a 38 to 150mm, f5.6 to f11 Canon zoom lens with 4x zoom range. The Smart Autofocus measures the distance to a subject and let you take sharp, precisely focused images. The powerful zoom lens incorporates two aspherical lens elements, which effectively correct for spherical aberration to ensure exceptional imaging performance throughout the zoom range. The camera uses Passive Autofocus, selects 3 points from 7 focusing points as lens is zoomed. The focusing range is 0.6m / 2 foot to infinity (Wide-angle), 1.0m / 3.3 ft. to infinity (Telephoto). Program Auto Exposure modes including Night and Action modes using the AE Exposure Control Program. The built in flash has a flash ready indicator and a recycling Time of Approximately 7 seconds with new batteries. The camera operates at ISO 100 in flash mode but has an ISO range of 25 to 3200 ISO automatically set in full-stop increments by DX code. The settable modes are Auto, Action, Night-scene, Portrait, Close-up, real-time Release. The camera also has auto film loading, auto film advance, auto rewind, mid-roll rewind, continuous shooting, electronically controlled self-timer (10 second delay), and shutter speeds of 2 seconds to 1/440 of a second. The camera operates on two CR2 3 volt lithium batteries with capacity to last through approximately fourteen 24 exposure rolls at 50 % Flash use. The dimensions are (W x H x D) 4.2 x 2.3 x 2in (107 x 58.7 x 51.5mm). This camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Canon: Sure Shot 150u (Prima Super 150u / Autoboy N150) camera  Canon: Sure Shot 150u (Prima Super 150u / Autoboy N150)2004  201711.00Released in 2004 Canon’s advanced new Canon Sure Shot 150u (Autoboy N150/Prima Super 150u), featuring a high-quality 38 to 150mm, f/5.6-11.3, 9 elements in 7 groups, 4x zoom lens, joins the popular Autoboy camera lineup one rank above the Autoboy N130 core model, released in August 2002. The zoom lens incorporates two aspherical lens elements, which effectively correct for spherical aberration to ensure exceptional imaging. The camera incorporates a combined AF/AE (Auto-Focus/Auto-Exposure) CMOS sensor in its passive 3-point AiAF (Artificial intelligence Automatic Focusing) system. Other advanced features include a selection of six “Best Shot Modes,” including Auto, Action and Night Portrait, to cater to a wide range of shooting conditions; and five settable Custom Functions to suit almost any shooting objective. Custom Functions include a continuous-shooting setting that enables a shooting speed of 0.7 frames per second, and Real-Time Release. It also has features such as manual exposure compensation of +/-1.5EV and dioptric adjustment from +0.5 to -2.5 diopter. The camera film speed setting can be ISO 25 to 3200 and is automatically set in full-stop increments by DX code. Some of the other features are mid-roll rewind, auto flash, red eye reduction, 10 second self-timer, auto focus, LED warning, and real-image zoom viewfinder. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Canon: Sure Shot 80 Tele (Prima BF Twin / Autoboy BF 80) camera  Canon: Sure Shot 80 Tele (Prima BF Twin / Autoboy BF 80)1995  20155.001995 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot 80 Tele (Prima BF Twin / Autoboy BF 80) camera  Canon: Sure Shot 80 Tele (Prima BF Twin / Autoboy BF 80)1995  200010.001995 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot 80 Tele (Prima BF Twin / Autoboy BF 80) camera  Canon: Sure Shot 80 Tele (Prima BF Twin / Autoboy BF 80)1995  20165.00The Canon Sure Shot 80 Tele SAF 35mm Film Camera comes with a Canon 38/80mm 1:3.7/7.3 zoom Lens and a built in flash. It uses a CR123A 3V battery to power all its features. The camera was also known as the Prima BF Twin in Europe plus other areas, and the Autoboy BF80 in Japan. The camera is a fully automatic autofocus camera with a button on the front to instantly switch between the 38mm focal length (for snapshots and landscapes) and 80mm focal length (for portraits). The direct zoom viewfinder gives a clear image area. Camera operation is simple with a mode dial on the camera back. With Ai-AF autofocusing, the camera focuses at three points in the image area and then selects the main subject to be focused. The Autoboy BF80 also has a panorama mode (13x36mm) prefocus enabled. There is also an electromagnetic programmed shutter and aperture, date imprinting in all modes, auto film advance, auto rewind, frame counter, film ISO plus exposure view window, ¼”x ½” LCD mode screen, direct zoom viewfinder. 0.4x - 0.85x magnification with 84% coverage, flash ready LED in the viewfinder, built in lens cover, and a handy carry strap. Within the viewfinder is an image-area frame, AF frame, close-up frame, and panorama frame. It also has an OK-to-Shoot LED (green) that lights when focus is achieved, blinks for close-up warning, has a camera-shake warning, and turns off during flash recycling. The camera was introduced in 1995 for an original price of $310.00. This is 24,800 yen and yen was worth approximately 80 yen per dollar in 1995. Today 24,800 yen would come to $205.00 with it taking 121.09 yen to make a dollar. The camera pictured here is in good condition but missing the flash lens cover and worth $5.00 in 2016.
Canon: Sure Shot 90u (Prima Zoom 90u) camera  Canon: Sure Shot 90u (Prima Zoom 90u)c2001-2003  200512.002001-2003 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot Ace (Prima Shot / Autoboy Prisma) Date camera  Canon: Sure Shot Ace (Prima Shot / Autoboy Prisma) Date1988  20074.501995 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot Classic 120 (Prima Super 120 / Autoboy 120) camera  Canon: Sure Shot Classic 120 (Prima Super 120 / Autoboy 120)1999  20097.001999 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot K camera  Canon: Sure Shot K1995  20005.001995 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot Max (Prima 5 / Autoboy Mini) camera  Canon: Sure Shot Max (Prima 5 / Autoboy Mini)1991  20156.001991 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot Max (Prima 5 / Autoboy Mini) Date camera  Canon: Sure Shot Max (Prima 5 / Autoboy Mini) Date1991  20155.001991 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot Mega (Prima / Autoboy) Zoom 76 camera  Canon: Sure Shot Mega (Prima / Autoboy) Zoom 761991  200510.002000 fine condition worth $25.00 in box with instruction book in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot Mega (Prima / Autoboy) Zoom 76 camera  Canon: Sure Shot Mega (Prima / Autoboy) Zoom 761991  20155.001991 good condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot Owl (Prima AF-7) camera  Canon: Sure Shot Owl (Prima AF-7)1994  201510.001994 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot Owl (Prima AF-8) Date camera  Canon: Sure Shot Owl (Prima AF-8) Date1997  20025.001997 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot Owl (Prima AF-8) Date camera  Canon: Sure Shot Owl (Prima AF-8) Date1997  20125.001997 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot Owl (Prima AF-8) Date camera  Canon: Sure Shot Owl (Prima AF-8) Date1997  199915.001997 poor condition worth $1.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot Supreme (Top Shot / Autoboy 3) camera  Canon: Sure Shot Supreme (Top Shot / Autoboy 3)1986  20165.001986 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Canon: Sure Shot Tele Max (Prima Twin S / Autoboy Mini T) camera  Canon: Sure Shot Tele Max (Prima Twin S / Autoboy Mini T)1991  201510.001991 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015 (Sure Shot Telemax Date/Prima Twin S Date/Autoboy Mini T Date)
Canon: Sure Shot Tele Max (Prima Twin S / Autoboy Mini T) camera  Canon: Sure Shot Tele Max (Prima Twin S / Autoboy Mini T)1991  20165.001991 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Canon: Sure Shot WP-1 camera  Canon: Sure Shot WP-11993  20025.001994 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot WP-1 camera  Canon: Sure Shot WP-11993  200210.001994 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot WP-1 camera  Canon: Sure Shot WP-11993  200210.001994 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot Z115 (Prima Zoom Super 115 / Autoboy S) camera  Canon: Sure Shot Z115 (Prima Zoom Super 115 / Autoboy S)1993  201012.002002 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot Z155 (Prima Super 155 / Autoboy 155) camera  Canon: Sure Shot Z155 (Prima Super 155 / Autoboy 155)2002  201010.002002 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot Zoom 76 (Prima Zoom 76 / Autoboy Juno 76) Date camera  Canon: Sure Shot Zoom 76 (Prima Zoom 76 / Autoboy Juno 76) Datec2000  20085.002000 Good condition worth $12.00 in 2014
Canon: Sure Shot Zoom 76 (Prima Zoom 76 / Autoboy Juno 76) Date camera  Canon: Sure Shot Zoom 76 (Prima Zoom 76 / Autoboy Juno 76) Datec2000  20156.002000 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Canon: Sure Shot Zoom 85 (Prima Zoom 85 / Autoboy Luna 85) Date camera  Canon: Sure Shot Zoom 85 (Prima Zoom 85 / Autoboy Luna 85) Date1998  20165.001998 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Canon: Sure Shot Zoom S (Prima Auto Zoom) camera  Canon: Sure Shot Zoom S (Prima Auto Zoom)1988  20025.001988 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Casio: QV-700 camera  Casio: QV-7001997  20173.50The Casio QV-700 was announced 1997 and the tenth digital camera in the QV-series finally had a built-in strobe! For the first time Casio's digital cameras matured into a serious digital camera unit. It featured continuous, time shot, panorama and interval shooting, a variety of image editing functions, a jog dial and for the first time removable memory. Continuous shooting was done by holding the shutter button down, the camera would shoot at one second intervals. The swivel lens with its built-in strobe to shoot darker scenes or at night and the new high-performance CPU allowed recording and playback of images within one second. A new color filter allowed for improved color reproduction and a quartz date function allowed for imprinting time and date on each image. When new the MSRP was $599. The camera has a 0.35MP 1/4" CCD, 640x480 resolution, Compact Flash external storage, f3.94mm /F2 lens, 1/8 of a second to 1/4,000 of a second shutter speeds, built in flash, f2 aperture range, 2.5 inch LCD screen and was 147 x 69 x 50mm in size plus weighed 290 grams. The camera uses two AA alkaline batteries for all functions. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and worth $1.00 in 2017
Chadwick-Miller: Fun-Face camera  Chadwick-Miller: Fun-Facec1979 201510.00This camera is all plastic and listed as a toy camera that happens to take pictures. It uses 126 cartridge film and recommends Kodak on the box it comes in. The camera is distributed by Chadwick Miller, Ink. Out of Canton Mass. 02021 and made in Hong Kong around 1979. The film is advanced by a small ridged wheel mounted at the top of the camera and a window on the back allows you to keep track of the 20 frames. The 126 cartridge was introduced by Kodak in 1963, and is associated mainly with low-end point-and-shoot cameras, particularly Kodak's own Instamatic series of cameras. Although 126 was once very popular, as of 2008 it is no longer manufactured, and few photofinishers will process it. It is available online but one cartridge can run you $10.00 or more. This camera has no double exposure protection nor does it have any flash capability. The molded plus painted face on the camera is mischievous at best and possibly scary to children at worst. The retail cost of the camera is unknown but around $1.00 or $2.00 could be the most. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition with the original box and worth $10.00 in 2015.
Chinon: Chinon 35 FX-III camera  Chinon: Chinon 35 FX-III1989  20092.001989 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Chinon: Chinon 35 FX-TM camera  Chinon: Chinon 35 FX-TM1989  20152.001989 poor condition worth $5.00 for parts in 2015 (battery door missing)
Chinon: Chinon CM-4S camera  Chinon: Chinon CM-4S1982  199040.001980-1982 good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Chinon: Chinon CM-4S camera  Chinon: Chinon CM-4S1982  199420.001980-1982 good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Chinon: Chinon CM-4S camera  Chinon: Chinon CM-4S1982  199020.001980-1982 good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Chinon: Chinon CM-5 camera  Chinon: Chinon CM-51982  199535.001981 Good condition worth $60.00 in 2014
Chinon: Chinon CS-4 camera  Chinon: Chinon CS-41980  200315.001978 good condition worth $45.00 in 2015
Chinon: Chinon Genesis camera  Chinon: Chinon Genesis1988  199152.001988 Good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Chinon: Chinon Genesis camera  Chinon: Chinon Genesis1988  199615.001988 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (missing face plate)
Chinon: Chinon Genesis III camera  Chinon: Chinon Genesis III1990  201320.001989 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Chinon: Handyzoom 5001 AF camera  Chinon: Handyzoom 5001 AF1990 201020.001989 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2015
Cinex: Cinex Candid camera  Cinex: Cinex Candidc1930-1936  19905.001930-1936 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Cinex: Cinex Deluxe camera  Cinex: Cinex Deluxec1950  
Ciro Cameras: Ciroflex D camera  Ciro Cameras: Ciroflex Dc1947-1950  19610.001946 Poor condition worth $10.00 in parts in 2015 (In 1962 we had a bad storm in New Jersey and our house was flooded. The water did not get to the camera but the moisture did.)
Clarus Camera: Clarus MS-35 camera  Clarus Camera: Clarus MS-35c1946-1952  201220.001946-1952 poor condition worth $40.00 for parts(A mint example would fetch $400.00 on today’s market)
Concord Cameras: Concord 110 EF camera  Concord Cameras: Concord 110 EFc1987-1990s 201711.00Made in China, and branded Concord, this 110 film camera has a built-in electronic flash with on off switch and ready LED light. Requires two AAA batteries for the flash only and has a 2 second refresh rate depending on batteries. The camera was produced from 1987 to 1990 and was listed as a pocket camera. The camera also has film view window in the back, 38mm plastic lens, viewfinder, thumb slide film advance, and a handy wrist style carry strap. This camera was also given the name “Neon Lites 110EF” and produced in bright pink amongst other colors like bright green, powder blue, orange and yellow. The pink Neon Lites camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Concord Cameras: Concord 110 EF camera  Concord Cameras: Concord 110 EFc1987-1990s  20152.001987 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Concord Cameras: Concord 118 camera  Concord Cameras: Concord 118c1987-1990s  20070.001978 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Concord Cameras: Concord 118 camera  Concord Cameras: Concord 118c1987-1990s  20169.001978 New condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Concord Cameras: Concord 806 camera  Concord Cameras: Concord 806c1987-1990s  20005.001985 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Concord Cameras: Concord 806 camera  Concord Cameras: Concord 806c1987-1990s  20161.001985 poor condition worth $2.00 in 2016 (esthetics bad but works)
Concord Cameras: Concord AW 905 camera  Concord Cameras: Concord AW 905c1987-1990s  20012.001986 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Concord Cameras: Concord EyeQ Mini camera  Concord Cameras: Concord EyeQ Mini2002  20162.00This 2002 camera has a lens aperture is f/2.8, minimum focal length 6.3 mm (focal length equivalent to 35mm Camera 24m), minimum focus distance 2 feet, 8 MB internal Memory, Video Capture AVI 320 x 240 for 32 sec with the 8MB built-in memory, real-image optical viewfinder, status LCD information display, frame counter, auto power save, USB connector, and it all operates with two AAA alkaline batteries. The image recording format is JPEG with a CMOS sensor resolution of 0.3 mega pixels. The camera is 3.1” wide, 2.1’ high, and ¾’ deep with a weight of 1.59 ounces. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $5.00 in 2016.
Concord Cameras: Crayola 110 Flash camera  Concord Cameras: Crayola 110 Flashc1998  20154.501985 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Concord Cameras: Le Clic camera  Concord Cameras: Le Clic1985  20151.001985 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Conley: Kewpie (No. 2A) camera  Conley: Kewpie (No. 2A)c1917-1922  201518.001917-1922 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Continental: EF135 camera  Continental: EF135c1970s  20168.00The camera was produced during the 1970’s. It uses a Conar f4 38mm lens with two ASA settings of 100 and 400 that change the aperture from f11 to f22. The camera comes with a built in flash, flash on/off switch, a flash ready lamp, a flash off LED next to the optical viewfinder, frame counter, rewind release button, fold down rewind crank that opens the film compartment when pull up completely, a right thumb film advance wheel, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount. The camera uses two AA batteries to power the flash and will work without batteries. It is a mostly plastic 35mm camera that feels good in your hands due to the weights added and also looks the part from 3 feet away. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Continental: Electroflash 555 S camera  Continental: Electroflash 555 Sc1970-1975  20172.00The Continental Electroflash 555-S is a 110 film cartridge pocket camera. As the name suggests, it has a built-in flash and the S after 555 stands for sensor. There is an Electroflash 555, which lacks the sensor and a slide switch selector on the top depicting a clouded sun plus just the sun as a second choice with numbers (80/125 plus 400) on the switch itself. This is for selecting the ASA, either 80 to 100 ASA or 400 ASA. A red LED in the viewfinder lets you know if you have enough light, or to turn on the flash and this LED is controlled via the sensor. Both cameras require two "AA" Alkaline Batteries plus on both the shutter is cocked by the perforations in the film, so the camera will not accept non-perforated reloads. Both cameras also have an on/off switch on top for the flash, a flash ready light, film observation window in the back that also is used as the frame counter, optical viewfinder, ¼” twenty thread tripod mount on the bottom of the camera, right thumb film advance slide lever, and a handy carry strap attach point. The sensor opening is between the lens and viewfinder on the 555-S model and “SENSOR” is printed directly under it. On the 555, in the same spot, is printed “OPTICAL LENS 1:8”. The shutter on both is a strange configuration consisting of a flapping door between the lens and the film. The lens is a single element meniscus so don't expect great results. This camera is not a very sophisticated imaging machine, however, it is adaptable to a pretty wide variety of photographic situations. A step up from a simple point and shoot but not a very big step. The 555 version was released early in 1970 then came the 555-S later that same year and Continental discontinued manufacturing both in 1975.
Coronet Camera: 3-D camera  Coronet Camera: 3-Dc1953  201622.00The Coronet 3D camera was manufactured by the Coronet Camera Company in circa 1954. A uniquely designed 3D camera advertised as two cameras in one, able to take stereoscopic pics or ordinary snap shot prints on standard number 127 roll film. It was constructed of plastic Bakelite with a built-in binocular viewer. The camera was made without and with a synchronized flash feature. A few variations in the body style was also made, including an early ribbed black body, a smooth black body and a speckled color body. This camera would take 4 stereo pair exposures, or a lever on the side allowed for blocking out the no. 1 lens and taking 8 single non-stereo exposures. The non-flash model was priced at $5.40 and the Synchronized flash model was priced at $5.80. The camera has two, meniscus fixed focus lenses, Single-blade guillotine shutter (spring powered) with a capping blade for the number one lens, and the format is 4, 42 x 50 mm exposures on 127 roll-film in consecutive stereo pairs. Film advance indicated by a round red window on the back cover. When taking stereo pairs the film is advanced until an odd number shows in the red window (1, 3, 5, and 7). When taking eight single exposures on a roll of film you would adjust the blanking plate over the number 1 lens. The film is advanced to show even and odd numbers in the red window starting with 1 and ending with 8. The camera pictured above is in fine condition and worth $60.00 in 2016.
Cosina Co: Cosina CT-1A camera  Cosina Co: Cosina CT-1Ac1980  200420.001980 good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Craftex Products: Hollywood Reflex Sportsman camera  Craftex Products: Hollywood Reflex Sportsmanc1947  201616.00Manufactured in USA from 1947 until 1950. It is a tall, unadorned metal box twin lens reflex camera. It takes 620 film and inside the camera it suggests Ansco Plenachrome PB-20 or Eastman Verichrome 620 for best results. This same camera had other variants like the Hollywood Reflex A, B, C, D, and E plus the Sightseer and Sportsman. These cameras were pseudo TLR with no connection or gearing between the lens focus mechanics and the viewfinder lens. You have to guess at the distance and set the focus range to what seemed correct. Only the Hollywood Reflex Model E was a true TLR with the gearing required and is the standout. The sportsman II has three shutter settings of 1/50 of a second, 1/150 of a second, and Time. The camera also has two aperture settings of f8 plus f16, a 80mm Achromat main lens, plunger shutter attach point, flash two conductor attach point, red window frame observation window in the back cover, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, large brilliant viewfinder under a fold down cage on top, line of sight viewfinder within the fold down cage, and a right hand film advance wheel. The serial number for this camera is 804195. The camera pictured above is in good condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
D-Link: DSC-350 camera  D-Link: DSC-3501999  20052.001998 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 Digital)
D-Link: DSC-350 camera  D-Link: DSC-3501999  20155.002000 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015 (1024MP x 768MP)
Dacora Dangelmaier: Digna camera  Dacora Dangelmaier: Digna1954  201712.00The Dacora Digna is a medium format 120 film fixed-lens viewfinder camera introduced by Dacora-Kamerawerk in 1954 to 1959. There are several variants of the Digna with different lenses ranging from the relatively high end Enna Correlar 80mm f/2.9 to more basic offerings like my example’s Dacora 80mm f/7.7 Achromat. The Digna was also sold as the Ilford Sporti in the British market. The Digna employs a spring-loaded telescoping lens which can be extended by rotating the lens barrel counterclockwise. Once released, the lens’ focus can be adjusted by rotating the ring immediately surrounding the front element. Two toggles on either side of the front element choose between two shutter speeds (B for Bulb and I for instant) and two apertures (f/8 and f/11). A flash sync socket is located at six o’clock on the front of the lens barrel. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Dacora Dangelmaier: Super Dignette camera  Dacora Dangelmaier: Super Dignette1956-1962  20158.001962 Poor condition worth $10.00 for parts in 2015 (stuck shutter)
Daiichi Kogaku: Zenobia camera  Daiichi Kogaku: Zenobiac1949  201627.00The Zenobia (ゼノビア) is a series of Japanese 4.5×6 folders, successors to the Waltax. They were made from 1952 to 1957 by Daiichi Kōgaku, later Zenobia Kōgaku; and they were distributed by Hattori Tokei-ten at least until 1955. All the Zenobia models have a body copied from the Ikonta A and inherited from the Waltax. Two companies sold modified and rebadged Zenobia cameras: Union Kōgaku offered the Union Semi, also called Union C-II, in 1953–4 and Walz the Walcon or Walcon Semi in 1954–5. In both cases the lens and shutter are different and there are other minor changes. The Zenobia C and Zenobia P are continuations of the Waltax Senior, without double-exposure prevention. According to Kokusan kamera no rekishi, both appear in the Japanese camera announcements column of the January 1952 issue of Asahi Camera. The C has a synchronized D.O.C.–Rapid shutter with B, 1–500 speeds, the P I has a synchronized NKS shutter with B, 1–200 speeds and the P II is the same as the P I with a self-timer. The D.O.C.-Rapid is a copy of the Compur and the NKS is a copy of the Prontor, so it is possible that "C" stands for Compur and "P" for Prontor, but this is only a guess. It is the only appearance of the Zenobia P mentioned by Kokusan kamera no rekishi. A Zenobia with NKK shutter to 1/200 has been reported to exist, but no picture has been observed yet. Shortly afterwards in 1952, the Zenobia C I and C II were advertised together. They are explicitly mentioned as an improvement of the Waltax. The lens is a four-element Tessar-type coated Hesper 75mm f/3.5. (Many people seem to believe that the Hesper has three elements and the later Neo-Hesper four, but the advertisements clearly state otherwise.) The C I is the new name of the C and it is offered for ¥14,000[3] with a D.O.C.-Rapid B, 1–500 shutter (advertised as a Compur-Rapid copy), synchronized with an ASA bayonet connector. The C II is offered for ¥15,000 with a Seikosha-Rapid shutter having similar specifications. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $50.00 in 2016.
DIANA: Diana F camera  DIANA: Diana Fc1960-1970s  20163.001960 good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
DIANA: Valiant Flash camera  DIANA: Valiant Flashc1960s  20165.00The Valiant Flash camera is a so-called "toy camera" that originated in the 1960s produced by the Great Wall Plastic Co. in China. This is a pure Diana-F "re-badged" for the name Valiant. Uses 120 roll and this camera is in the original box, with the original manual. The Diana F clone, was produced under many names for different markets. Some were sold as promotional items (there is a Readers Digest version, for example). Most all Diana’s use 120 film but some versions of the camera take 127 or 620 film. The lens is plastic with some anomalies that show up in photographs. A roll of 120 film will give you 16 frames. Focusing is done by twisting the lens to 3 zones, 4-6ft, 6-12ft, or 12ft to infinity. There are several variations in top-plate and lens-barrel style; some have fake light-meter windows and a few have flash sync. Diana’s have recently (in c.2007) become very popular for the effects their poor lens and build quality can impart to a photograph - so popular that it is now again possible to buy them new, and also possible to pay as much for a Diana as for a cheap -or even a mid-range - digital camera! Some popular Diana clone names: Acme, Anny, Altic, Arrow, Arrow Flash, Asiana, Avis, Banier, Banner, Barri-Shelli, Bergère- de France, Binaflex, Black Bird, Candy, Chase, Clicker, Codeg, Colorflash Deluxe, Debonair, Debro, Debutante, Diana, Diana+ / Diana Plus, Diana Deluxe, Diana F, Diana F+, Diana Mini, Dionne F2, Dories, Eikow, Flocon RF 222, Future Scientist Flash, Gray Line, Harrow, Hi-Flash, Hong Meow, Justen, Lina, Lina S, Mark L, MegoMatic, Merit, Mirage, Panax, Photon 120, Pioneer, Pokey, Raleigh, Rand, Reader's Digest, Reliance, Rosko, Rover, Samtoy, See, Shakey's, Sinomax, Stellar, Stellar Flash, Tina, Traceflex, Tru-View, Valiant, Windsor, Zip, and Zodiac. This Information was acquired from CGcollectibles. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $25.00 with the box and instructions in 2016.
Discovery Kids: Digital Camera camera  Discovery Kids: Digital Camera2009  20142.002009 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (640 x 480)
DS-Max: HC 2000 camera  DS-Max: HC 2000c1991  20085.001991 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
DS-Max: PN338 camera  DS-Max: PN338c1995  20125.001995 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Emerson: 10x25 Digital Camera camera  Emerson: 10x25 Digital Camerac2010  201420.002010 New condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (0.3MP)
eVision: MEGApro camera  eVision: MEGAproc2003  20085.002000 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014 (2.0MP)
FED: FED 3 (Type b) (Revue 3) camera  FED: FED 3 (Type b) (Revue 3)1966-1976  201530.001963-1980 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2015
FED: FED 3 (Type b) (Revue 3) camera  FED: FED 3 (Type b) (Revue 3)1966-1976  201618.00The FED 3 is a Ukrainian rangefinder camera inspired by classic Leicas. Over two million were produced from 1961 to 1979. It takes 35mm film. The FED 3 is an evolution of the FED 2 and the dimensions of the two bodies are identical. The top deck is modified because the FED 3 has to have a shorter rangefinder base to make room for the slow-speed mechanism. Shutter speeds are 1 sec, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500s and "B". In common with many Soviet-era cameras, the shutter must be cocked before the speed is altered. There are four definable models in the FED 3 series. FED 3a was introduced in 1961. It retained most of the FED 2 features, including the mushroom-shaped advance knob. The rewind knob is larger. The diopter is no longer adjusted by a lever but is adjusted by the ring over the viewfinder. FED 3b was introduced in 1963. It has a film advance lever and a flat top deck. It had no strap lugs, but an ever-ready case was originally available. The FED 3b is usually fitted with an Industar 26M or Industar 61 lens. These are interchangeable with other lenses with an M39 mount, but are not 100% compatible with the Leica standard. The camera pictured here is in fine condition with the Industar 31mm lens and worth $35.00 in 2016. FED 3L was introduced along with the 3b in 1963, and has a body like the 3a but a different shutter speed knob. The knob on a 3L resembles the ones on the FED 3b; the speeds are engraved on a plate beneath the knob instead of on the knob itself. The shutter speed plate is clipped where the top deck steps down. Usually fitted with an Industar 61 lens. FED 3L/D is a FED 3L with a multi-coated Industar 61 L/D containing Lanthane.
Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (J8209) camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (J8209)2006  20125.002006 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 Digital)
Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (J8209) camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (J8209)2006  20125.002006 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 Digital)
Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341) camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341)2007  20152.002006 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 Digital)
Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341) camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341)2007  20142.002007 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 Digital)
Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341) camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341)2007  20035.002007 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 Digital)
Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341) camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341)2007  20152.002007 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 Digital)
Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341) camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (L8341)2007  20155.002007 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (V2751) camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (V2751)2010-2011  20136.002010-2011 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (0.3MP)
Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (V2751) camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher Price (V2751)2010-2011  20162.002010-2011 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016 (0.3MP)
Fisher-Price: Fisher-Price Perfect Shot camera  Fisher-Price: Fisher-Price Perfect Shot1994-1997  20070.001994-1997 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Focal: Focal Flip 11 camera  Focal: Focal Flip 111975-1978 20152.001975 Good condition worth $4.00 in 2015 (could be a Ansco GAF or 3M Ferrania )
Focal: Focal Flip 11 camera  Focal: Focal Flip 111975-1978 20155.00Kmart is a chain of discount stores based in the United States and founded in 1962. They are known to use the brand name Focal for their photographic products. The cameras and accessories are typically rebranded products from major manufactures like Haking and Cosina. There was also a house brand Focal and cine films, which was early on and often manufactured by Ansco GAF but later changed to 3M Ferrania films. The Focal branding slowly disappeared in the 1990's, it was last seen on 35mm film. The Sears Holdings Corporation now owns the Kmart chain as of 2005 and have over 249,000 employees. The focal flip II was introduced in 1975 when the 110 cartridge format had 3 years under its belt. The frame size is 13 mm × 17 mm (0.51 in × 0.67 in), with one registration hole. The film is fully housed in a plastic cartridge, which also registers the image when the film is advanced. There is a continuous backing paper, and the frame number and film type are visible through a window at the rear of the cartridge. The flip 11 also has a window that takes advantage of that film cartridge window. Kodak introduced 110 film cartridges in 1972 and Kodak also produced Kodachrome 110 slide film until 1982 the same year they discontinued the film. In 2012 Lomography re-introduced slide film for 110 and Black and White Orca film at 100 ISO speed. The slide film however, is ASA 200 so a ND filter has to be used over the lens or the exposure compensation dial has to be used where available. The Focal flip II is one of the smallest fully enclosed 110 cameras ever made and was named for the Flip Flash Bar that it employed. These also are still available. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2015.
Focal: PC620 camera  Focal: PC6201985 20091.00The Focal PC620 is a focus free fully automatic camera introduced in 1985. It has auto load, auto rewind, built in flash, flash ready LED, built in lens cover, frame counter, and a handy carry strap. The camera was assembled in China and the parts were made in Taiwan. The camera pictured above unfortunately had the batteries left in much to long and they destroyed the battery compartment contacts. This camera is for parts only and worth about $1.00 in 2016.
Focal: Tele Focal camera  Focal: Tele Focal1977  20165.00The Focal Tele Focal uses 110 cartridge film plus for indoor photography it used disposable flip-flash and had a suggested retail price of $23.88. It was made in Japan, distributed by Kmart in the US, and introduced in 1977. The tele Focal included both "normal" and "tele" modes with an f11 42 or 25mm lenses. A selector slide switch slid a lens in front of the 25mm lens to combine for 42mm. The slide switch also cropped the viewfinder but did not change its optics. The camera also has a view window in the back for frame count, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, right thumb slide film advance, 1/60 of a second fixed shutter, flipflash socket, and a handy carry strap. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016. Kmart is a chain of discount stores based in the United States and founded in 1962. They are known to use the brand name Focal for their photographic products. The cameras and accessories are typically rebranded products from major manufactures like Haking and Cosina. There was also a house brand Focal and cine films, which early on was usually manufactured by Ansco GAF but later changed to 3M Ferrania films. The Focal branding slowly disappeared in the 1990's, it was last seen on 35mm film. The chain acquired Sears in 2005 and both still sell products today.
Focal: Tele Lectro Flash 110 camera  Focal: Tele Lectro Flash 1101985  20131.001985 Good condition worth $7.00 in 2014
Foto-Quelle: Revue ML camera  Foto-Quelle: Revue ML1984  199610.001978-1984 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Franka Werke: Rolfix (1931) camera  Franka Werke: Rolfix (1931)c1931-1937  199920.001931 Good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Clear Shot camera  Fuji Optical: Clear Shot1993  20145.002004 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Clear Shot Plus (Smart Shot Deluxe) camera  Fuji Optical: Clear Shot Plus (Smart Shot Deluxe)1994  20095.001997 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (1 of 2)
Fuji Optical: Discovery 1000 Zoom camera  Fuji Optical: Discovery 1000 Zoom1992-1993  20135.001992-1993 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Discovery 60 camera  Fuji Optical: Discovery 60c1990  20165.001990 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Fuji Optical: Discovery 900 Zoom Date Plus camera  Fuji Optical: Discovery 900 Zoom Date Plus  20175.00The Discovery 900 Zoom Date Plus is a fully automatic 35mm powered zoom camera introduced by Fuji in 1991. It was also released as the FZ-950 Zoom Date and in Japan as the Zoom Cardia 950 Date. Non date version were also sold as Discovery 900 Zoom Plus, and FZ-950 Zoom. It was sold in Kmart stores as the Discovery 875 Zoom Plus. The camera uses a Fujinon branded 38 to 85mm f/3.8 to 8.2 auto focus zoom lens. Zooming the lens requires pressing either the two tree buttons on the camera shoulder. There is also a dedicated mountain infinity focus and an AF lock button. The electronic shutter has speeds from 1/8 to 1/250 of a second. The flash system uses Fuji's HG cards that slide onto the top of the camera. Cards include macro flash, night pre-flash and an auto daylight card. The film transport is based on a pre-wind loading system as well as drop-in film loading. It is able to use DX coded film with speeds of 50 to 1600 ISO. The camera also features a motorized built in lens cover, built in flash, flash ready LED, red eye reduction, auto film advance, auto rewind, mid-roll rewind, zoom in button, zoom out button, ½’ by 1” LCD mode screen, ¼” 20 thread per inch tripod socket, and a handy carry strap. The camera is powered by one 223A 6V lithium battery. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Fuji Optical: Discovery S1450 (Zoom Date 145/Super 145AZ) camera  Fuji Optical: Discovery S1450 (Zoom Date 145/Super 145AZ)2001  201610.002001 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Fuji Optical: Discovery S700 (Discovery S770) Zoom camera  Fuji Optical: Discovery S700 (Discovery S770) Zoom2003  20155.002003 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Fuji Optical: Endeavor 350ix camera  Fuji Optical: Endeavor 350ixc1999  200810.002000 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (4.0MP)
Fuji Optical: FinePix 2400 Zoom camera  Fuji Optical: FinePix 2400 Zoom2000  201517.501999 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (2.1 MP)
Fuji Optical: FinePix A205 Zoom (FinePix A205s) camera  Fuji Optical: FinePix A205 Zoom (FinePix A205s)2003  20135.002003 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (2.0MP)
Fuji Optical: FinePix A210 Zoom camera  Fuji Optical: FinePix A210 Zoom2003  20098.002003 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (3.2MP)
Fuji Optical: FinePix A340 camera  Fuji Optical: FinePix A3402004  20105.002004 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014 (4.0MP)
Fuji Optical: FinePix A345 Zoom camera  Fuji Optical: FinePix A345 Zoom2005  201010.002005 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (4.1MP)(1 of 2)
Fuji Optical: FinePix F450 Zoom camera  Fuji Optical: FinePix F450 Zoom2004  20083.002004 poor condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (3.0MP)
Fuji Optical: FinePix F700 camera  Fuji Optical: FinePix F7002003  20155.002003 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts in 2015 (3.1 MP)
Fuji Optical: Fotonex 10 (Endeavor / EPION) camera  Fuji Optical: Fotonex 10 (Endeavor / EPION)c1996  200410.002000 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Fotonex 300 Zoom camera  Fuji Optical: Fotonex 300 Zoomc1996  20103.002000 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Fotonex 3000ix Zoom (Endeavor / EPION 3000) MRC camera  Fuji Optical: Fotonex 3000ix Zoom (Endeavor / EPION 3000) MRC1999  201610.00The 1999 Fujifilm Endeavor 3000ix is an APS point-and-shoot film camera that captures brilliant, richly colored photographs at the click of a button. The built-in flash in this Fujifilm film camera fires a high-intensity burst of light – useful when shooting in low-light conditions. The Fujifilm film camera features an autofocus system with focus lock, which helps you accurately focus on any fast-moving object. Moreover, the red-eye reduction feature of this point-and-shoot film camera effectively reduces the red-eye effect caused by using a flash. What’s more, take blur-free self-photographs with the Fujifilm Endeavor 3000ix that boasts a self-timer function. The camera has a 30-90mm zoom f/4-f/10.5 8 elements in 6 group’s lens, APS (IX240 cartridge) film format, Mid-roll rewind, Auto rewind, Auto film advance, Macro focus, Active type auto focus with focus lock, Programmed exposure modes, Fill flash (forced flash), Flash-off mode, Night portrait (flash synch) mode, Panorama mode, and a self-timer. New the camera came with a remote control, one roll of film, instruction booklet, $12.00 worth of Fuji film coupons, and a warranty registration card. The camera pictured here has the original boxes, film, remote, and paperwork. It is worth $25.00 in 2016.
Fuji Optical: Fuji DL 300 camera  Fuji Optical: Fuji DL 3001986  20165.001986 good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Fuji Optical: Fuji DL 320 (Discovery 320 / Cardia Super 320) Zoom camera  Fuji Optical: Fuji DL 320 (Discovery 320 / Cardia Super 320) Zoom1998  20125.001999 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Fuji DL 800 Zoom camera  Fuji Optical: Fuji DL 800 Zoom1989  20125.001987 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014
Fuji Optical: Fuji STX-2 camera  Fuji Optical: Fuji STX-2c1985  201610.00The Fuji STX-2 was introduced by Fuji in 1985 and was a basic manual SLR using 35mm film. It has TTL metering and 3 LEDs in the viewfinder to indicate exposure. The design of the body means it's easier to set the shutter speed and then alter the aperture of the lens to gain correct exposure, which tends to go against those who prefer to be creative with depth of field effects, but where time allows, the process can be done the other way round. The camera is a fully manual SLR camera utilizing Fujinon X-mount lenses and when new it came with a 50mm, f/1.9-16 (5 elements) with close focus at 0.6m lens. The shutter speeds are 1/1000 of a second to ½ second and Bulb. The camera has ISO settings from 25 to 3200. The viewfinder has 92% coverage, chosen shutter speed, and +ve and -ve LEDs for exposure warnings. The film is manual loaded, manual film advance and rewinding. It also has frame counter, Shutter release lock (also conserves batteries), hot shoe (flash sync speed 1/60s), ¼” 20 thread tripod socket, and self-timer. The exposure meter requires two LR44 watch batteries and the camera weighs 625g with lens mounted, 480g body only. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition due to the ASA selector. For this reason it is worth $20.00 for parts in 2016.
Fuji Optical: Fujica 35 Auto M camera  Fuji Optical: Fujica 35 Auto Mc1962  199010.001962 poor condition worth $2.00 for parts in 2014
Fuji Optical: Fujica Compact S camera  Fuji Optical: Fujica Compact S1966  19975.001970 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts in 2014
Fuji Optical: Fujica ST 701 camera  Fuji Optical: Fujica ST 701c1971  201520.001971 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Fuji Optical: Fujica STX-1 camera  Fuji Optical: Fujica STX-1c1979  199510.001982 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Fujifilm DX-10 camera  Fuji Optical: Fujifilm DX-101999  20062.001999 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014 (0.8MP)
Fuji Optical: Nexia Q1 camera  Fuji Optical: Nexia Q1c2001 20152.002001 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Fuji Optical: Nexia Q1 camera  Fuji Optical: Nexia Q1c2001 20165.00The 2001 Fujifilm Nexia Q1 is a fixed lens APS film camera made in China for Fujifilm (Japan). This simple fancy camera offers the three picture formats and the film reload option of the APS film system. It was available in a range of colors all shiny including silver, orange, pink, purple to name a few. Fuji also released digital versions of the Q1, called the Digital Q1 and Digital Q1 3M. The camera uses APS films with 100 to 800 ASA film speed. It has a f1.8 22mm lens, electronically controlled shutter with just one speed of 1/100 of a second, Active Autofocus, magnification 0.34x viewfinder, auto film advance plus rewind, mid-roll rewind button, and guide number 6.6 flash with red eye reduction by a red LED fired automatically under low light. The dimensions are 3.78 x 2.95 x 1.34 inches and the weight is 3.9 ounces. The camera runs on one CR2 3V lithium battery. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016.
Fuji Optical: Quicksnap Waterproof camera  Fuji Optical: Quicksnap Waterproof2003  20125.002003 New condition worth $6.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Smart Shot Plus camera  Fuji Optical: Smart Shot Plusc2002  20125.002002 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Smart Shot Plus camera  Fuji Optical: Smart Shot Plusc2002  20135.002002 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Fuji Optical: Zoom Date 100 camera  Fuji Optical: Zoom Date 1002002  201310.002001 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
GAF: Anscomatic 126 camera  GAF: Anscomatic 126c1967  201613.00After 1967, the Binghamton, New York camera-maker formerly known as Ansco began using the trademark GAF. The Anscomatic 126 is a response to the runaway success of the Kodak Instamatic series. It is a simple fixed focus snapshot camera using drop-in 126 film cassettes. The top of the camera has a socket for flashcubes that came in many varieties and intensities depending on distance needed for the photo. The camera also has a flash release button on the front just over the lens assembly, automatic flashcube rotation, a large optical viewfinder, a frame counter on the top, double exposure protection, two speed shutter, lever film advance, shutter button, and a handy carry strap. In 1967 you could buy the camera for $15.00 or for three more dollars you had the complete outfit and it came with a one year unconditional guarantee. It is a good looking, reliable, inexpensive camera that is easy to use. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $23.00 in 2016.
GAF: Anscomatic 436 camera  GAF: Anscomatic 436c1960s  20035.001970 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
GAF: Anscomatic 626 camera  GAF: Anscomatic 626c1967 20179.00The Anscomatic 626 is a camera for 126 film cartridges made in Japan by Petri and offered by GAF in the late 1960s. Ansco did not adopt the parent company name of GAF till 1967 and most of the other Anscomatic 126 film cameras were introduced in 1967. The Petri 607 was introduced in 1968 and is the Anscomatic 626 rebranded by GAF. This tells us that the year of introduction of the GAF Anscomatic 626 almost certainly was 1968. The 626 featured auto exposure controlled by a CdS photocell. This was one of a series of 126 models offered by GAF in response to the success of the Kodak Instamatic line. The camera has a 34mm f2.8 lens with three adjustments of 1m, 2.5m, and infinity marked on the outer lens rim plus depicted in the viewfinder with icons. The icons are a person from the chest up, people, and mountains. Also in the viewfinder is a battery meter that activated when the countersunk red battery check button on the right side of the camera was pressed. The ring around the battery test button reads “TEST BATTERY WITHOUT FILM IN CAMERA”. The aperture was controlled by the camera powered by two AAA batteries. The camera used flash cubes and has a release button to the right of the flash cube socket. The camera also has a very convenient, single action, and single through thumb lever film advance. Other features are ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, large shutter lever on the front of the camera, and two hard points, one on either side for mounting a carry strap. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
GAF: Anscomatic Cadet Flash camera  GAF: Anscomatic Cadet Flash1966-1967  200910.001967 poor condition worth $3.00 in 2014
GAF: GAF L-CM camera  GAF: GAF L-CM1975  200320.001975 good condition worth $40.00 in 2014
GAF: GAF Pocket 200 camera  GAF: GAF Pocket 200c1970  20053.001970 poor condition worth $0.50 in 2014
GAF: GAF Pocket 220 camera  GAF: GAF Pocket 2201973  20125.001973 made by Chinon Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Gateway: DC-M50 camera  Gateway: DC-M502003  201510.002003 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015 (5.0 MP)
GE: T123 camera  GE: T1232011  201159.002011 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (12MP)
GE: T123 camera  GE: T1232011  201159.002011 Poor condition for parts only worth $0.00 in 2014 (12MP)
Genos: Genos Rapid camera  Genos: Genos Rapidc1950  20015.001950 Poor condition for parts worth $3.00 in 2014
GOMZ: Lubitel camera  GOMZ: Lubitelc1949-1956 201530.00The Lubitel was produced by the Gomz factory (GOMZ stands for Gosularstvennyi Optiko-Mekhanicheskii Zavod (State Optical-Mechanical Factory). Founded in 1932 near Leningrad (now St. Petersburg)) from 1949 to 1956 and Over one million units were constructed. The shutter speeds range from B, 1/19, 1/25, 1/50, 1/100, 1/200 and no self-timer. The main lens is a 75/4.5 (coated) and the viewfinder lens is a 60/2.8. For taking pictures at eye level (shots have then more natural perspective) the frame viewfinder is used. This is more convenient when there is experience in estimating distances by eye and in correct focusing according to distance scale. This camera is the successor to the Komsomolets (1946-1950) with one major innovation that was inspired by the 1938 Voightlander Brilliant it copied, a coupled gearing system to connect the main lens and viewfinder lens, allowing each to be focused in sync. The main lens and viewing lens both opened up to a nice 'n' bright f/2.8 with a wider angle of view. The name 'Lubitel' roughly translates to a combination of ‘Hobbyist and Amateur.’ Like the Komsomolets, it was produced in Bakelite and a Chinese copy of this original Lubitel emerged in 1961 under the mysteriously hilarious name, 'Changle.' To be clear the Lubitel is a copy of the Voightlander Brilliant and the Changle is a copy of the Lubitel. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $30.00 in 2015.
Graflex: Century Graphic camera  Graflex: Century Graphic1949-1970  2014350.001949-1970 Fine condition worth $425.00 in 2014
Graflex: Ciro 35 camera  Graflex: Ciro 351950s  201515.00In 1949, Ciro Cameras purchased designs for the Cee-ay 35 camera. This 35 mm camera was produced by the Candid Camera Corporation of America. Though highly influential, the Cee-ay 35 was only in production for a matter of months before Ciro-flex purchased the design and remarketed it as the Ciro-35. Ciro Cameras and all of its models were sold on October 1, 1951 to Graflex Inc. The Ciro-35 and Ciro-flex models were continued for several years under the same name but identified as Graflex products. Eventually, Graflex rebranded the models to the Graflex 22, Ciro-flex, and the Graphic 35, Ciro-35. Therefore the years of production for the Graflex Ciro 35 are 1951-1953 though the Ciro 35 was produced from 1949-1953. This information was found on “The Ohio Historical Society” site and written by E. Higgins https://ohiohistory.wordpress.com/2010/01/07/ohios-camera/ This rangefinder camera had a unique sliding focus lever that had a pointer on one side of the lens and the lever on the other. The pointer scale was graduated from 3 foot to infinity and the mechanism was integrated with the rangefinder. The shutter was mad by Wllensak for Graflex and the camera has an f/3.5 50mm Rodenstock lens marked as a Graflex Graftar lens. Another interesting feature is the locking method for the film chamber. It is a large bar that turns from LOCK to OPEN and is easy to operate. On the inside cover of this Ciro 35 is the words “Ciro Cameras Inc, Delaware, Ohio”, to lend credence to the above paragraph. This camera pictured here is missing the mounting part of the hot shoe but I list the camera as good. The camera is worth $20.00 in 2015.
Graflex: Ciro 35 camera  Graflex: Ciro 351950s  201621.001949 fine condition worth $50.00 in 2016
Graflex: Graphic 35 camera  Graflex: Graphic 351955-1957  201523.001955-1957 fine condition worth $40.00 in 2015
Graflex: Graphic 35 camera  Graflex: Graphic 351955-1957  201528.001955-1957 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2015
Graflex: Speed Graphic camera  Graflex: Speed Graphic1912-1941  2013180.001935-1939 good condition worth $250.00 in 2014
Gundlach: Korona (folding) camera  Gundlach: Korona (folding)c1920s  2009210.00The Korona Series III camera was manufactured by the Gundlach Optical Company in circa 1900. Designed as an improvement over the earlier models (except for the extended bellows) but with a reversible patent swing-back. It also can accommodate a special bed for use with wide angle lens which could be purchased separately and attached to this camera as an option. The camera was constructed of wood with a seal grain cover. It has Rack and pinion focus with a rising and falling wood front. The hardware is nickel plated and highly polished. Spring actuated ground glass focusing screen to accept Korona plate holders. A reversible brilliant finder and two tripod sockets. This one had a fold down cross hair view finder as you can see on top. In its original configuration it was fitted with an instantaneous symmetrical lens or a Turner-Reich lens housed in a model F automatic shutter. The camera was available in two sizes to take either 4 x 5 or 5 x 7. Price in 1902 was $22 and $27 respectively. The company roots can be traced to 1879, when Ernst Gundlach and Lewis R. Sexton started working on optical goods manufacturing and trading. The Gundlach Optical Company name was registered in 1884 after Lewis died. In 1895 Ernst left the company, but it continued to bore his name. In 1896 Gundlach Optical acquired the Milburn Korona Company (founded in 1894). Later, in 1902, the company acquired another business - Manhattan Optical Company and the combined establishment was renamed to Gundlach-Manhattan Optical Company. The name was changed again several times: first to Gundlach Manufacturing Corporation, then to Seebold Invisible Camera Company, and finally to Dynamic Optics Inc., which closed its doors in 1972. The camera pictured above has had the lens changed to a Kodak Kodamatic 170mm anasticmate lens with a serial number of 53635. The lens is younger than the body by about 14 years and is found on the Kodak Photographic Deluxe from 1916. The Korona series 3, 4x5 camera, has a value of $150-$225 if it were to still have the original lens/shutter. Funny, but most of the time when a change is made to a camera it tends to decrease the value. However in this case the fact that the original lens/shutter has been exchanged is a good thing. According to McKeown's Camera Price Guide the original lenses were inferior and many photographers changed-out the lens for a better one. This has helped the value of these cameras, doubling the value. So the camera has a value of $300-$450 in 2014.
Haking: APSilon 30 AF camera  Haking: APSilon 30 AF1996  20155.001996 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Haking: Halina 35 camera  Haking: Halina 35c1982  20155.001984 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015 (Ansco memo 35)
Haking: Halina Ansco Pixflash camera  Haking: Halina Ansco Pixflashc1987  20151.001987 good condition worth $3.00 in 2015
Haking: Halina Ansco Silhouette Zoom camera  Haking: Halina Ansco Silhouette Zoom1990s  201215.001990 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Hanna Barbera: Fred Flintstone (126) camera  Hanna Barbera: Fred Flintstone (126)c1978 20172.00The Fred Flintstone camera was introduced in 1978 to coincide with a compilation series “Fred Flintstone and Friends” (1977-1978). The original show ran from September 1960 to April 1966 and has aired in reruns plus other forms to this date. The camera is listed as a 126 film cartridge toy camera. The camera instructions on the back of the original packing direct you to load 126 Kodacolor film or Kodak Verichrome for black and white prints and Kodachrome-X or Ektachrome-X for color transparencies. The focus range is 4 feet to infinity and a window in the back of the camera shows the number of exposures and film type. The camera labeling on the original package recommends for use by children ages 3 and up and made in Hong Kong also can be found. The made in Hong Kong label in reinforced by the embossed lettering on the frame of the film view window on the back of the camera and some packaging has the IMCO logo that stands for IMCO Toy LTD now known as HKTDC (exporter from Hong Kong). The viewfinder is a frame type with no optics, just clear plastic. The camera also has a film advance knob on the top, shutter release by Fred’s nose, and comes with a handy carry strap. The camera in this picture is in Poor condition and worth 50 cents in 2017.
Hanna Barbera: Fred Flintstone (126) camera  Hanna Barbera: Fred Flintstone (126)c1978 201718.00The Fred Flintstone camera was introduced in 1978 to coincide with a compilation series “Fred Flintstone and Friends” (1977-1978). The original show ran from September 1960 to April 1966 and has aired in reruns plus other forms to this date. The camera is listed as a 126 film cartridge toy camera. The camera instructions on the back of the original packing direct you to load 126 Kodacolor film or Kodak Verichrome for black and white prints and Kodachrome-X or Ektachrome-X for color transparencies. The focus range is 4 feet to infinity and a window in the back of the camera shows the number of exposures and film type. The camera labeling on the original package recommends for use by children ages 3 and up and made in Hong Kong also can be found. The made in Hong Kong label in reinforced by the embossed lettering on the frame of the film view window on the back of the camera and some packaging has the IMCO logo that stands for IMCO Toy LTD now known as HKTDC (exporter from Hong Kong). The viewfinder is a frame type with no optics, just clear plastic. The camera also has a film advance knob on the top, shutter release by Fred’s nose, and comes with a handy carry strap. The camera pictured in here is in New condition and worth $25.00 in 2017.
Herbert George: Donald Duck Camera camera  Herbert George: Donald Duck Camerac1946 201520.001946 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Herbert George: Herco Imperial (620 Snap Shot) camera  Herbert George: Herco Imperial (620 Snap Shot)1950s  201510.001951 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Herbert George: Official Boy Scouts of America (3-way) camera  Herbert George: Official Boy Scouts of America (3-way)c1950s  201710.00The Official 3-Way Boy Scouts Camera was originally manufactured by the Herbert George Company of Chicago Illinois in the 1950s. This was the same camera as the Mark 27, except it carry different styling and the Boys Scout logo on the flip up flash cover. It was an innovative design as it incorporated the view finder and flash unit as part of the camera, and also provided a decorative cover for the flash unit when not in use. The camera was simple, compact and inexpensive and entirely made of plastic. It featured a simple fixed focus meniscus lens, and a switch to adjust the aperture for color or black and white film. It was capable of capturing 2 X 2 inch color slides, kodacolor or B&W pictures on number 127 roll film. It used the small number AG-1 flash bulbs sometimes called "jelly bean" bulbs. This camera sold for $5.95, which was more than the Boy Scout Mark XII. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Herbert George: Official Cub Scout (Imperial Debonair) camera  Herbert George: Official Cub Scout (Imperial Debonair)c1950s  201714.00This is a c1950s that uses rollfilm and a box-styled camera. The Herbert George Company was founded in Chicago, Illinois by Herbert Weil and George Israel in 1945. The Imperial and Herco brand names proved to be popular. The Herbert George Company pioneered the introduction of the all in one camera featuring built-in flash and view finders, and was one of the first to offer multiple colored camera. In 1961 with a change of ownership, the company was renamed to the Imperial Camera Corp. This camera was constructed of a sturdy shock-resistant Bakelite plastic featuring a built-in view finder, synchronized flash sockets, fixed focus lens and simple snap shot shutter for quick shots. A Cub Scout version was also made with the only change being the logo on the metal face plate in the front. The camera is capable of capturing twelve exposures, 3 1/4 x 1 1/2 inch in size, on number 620 color or black and white roll film. The frames were counted using the numbers on the paper backing of the film and a small oval red window in the back of the camera. It is flash capable and used number 8 bulbs in the flash attachment that plugged in the top next to the viewfinder. It was made in various colors including, brown, olive, maroon and black. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
HP: Photosmart 215 camera  HP: Photosmart 215  20175.00The HP PhotoSmart 215 is designed for those consumers who want an easy-to-use, point-and-shoot digital camera, without having to fuss over exposure controls. The 215's simplified user interface and automatic exposure controls give consumers just that -- straightforward digital photography with no hassles. The Camera's simple design features very few external controls and an uncomplicated LCD-based menu system. The 1.3-megapixel CCD produces images as large as 1,280 x 960 pixels, with three JPEG quality settings available. On the back panel is a small status display screen directly over the 1.8-inch color 61,600 pixels LCD monitor. The status display reports camera settings and enables you to operate the camera with the LCD monitor switched off, thus conserving battery power. The camera also has 2x digital 6.68mm (43.4mm equivalent) lens zoom lens with autofocus, auto focus, auto flash, red eye reduction, auto exposure, apertures ranging from f/2.8 to f/8.0, Shutter speeds from 1/750 to 1/3 of a second, Sensitivity equivalent to ISO 100, built-in flash with four operating modes, and operates using four AA batteries. The camera connects to PCs via USB port and images are saved as JPEGs on Type I CompactFlash memory cards. The camera originally came with a USB cable for quick connection to a PC, software CD containing ArcSoft PhotoImpression, PhotoMontage, and camera drivers (for Windows only). You could purchase an AC adapter in 2001 when the camera was new. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
HP: Photosmart 320 camera  HP: Photosmart 3202002  20142.002002 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (2.1MP)
HP: Photosmart 435 camera  HP: Photosmart 4352003  201310.002003 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (3.1MP)
HP: Photosmart 435 camera  HP: Photosmart 4352003  201310.002003 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (3.1MP)
HP: Photosmart 620 camera  HP: Photosmart 6202002  201610.00The 2002 Photosmart 620 has a maximum resolution of 1632 x 1232 or effective 2.1 megapixels. It also has a 36-102mm lens (35mm equivalent), 1/3" (4.8 x 3.6 mm) CCD sensor, f/2.8 to f/5.6 aperture, 1.5” screen, built in flash, automatic white-balance system, and image preview. The HP Photosmart 620 is large for a 2-megapixel camera, with much of the bulk coming from its four AA batteries, which provide very good battery life. Operation is kept simple with dedicated buttons that control image quality, flash mode, self-timer, 4X digital plus 3X optical zoom (12X total), maximum shutter speed 1/1000 of a second, minimum shutter speed 1/3 of a second, 8MB flash internal storage, SD card slot, and image preview, all without the hassle of using menus. The camera also has dual shutter-release buttons (The large one for stills, the other for video) and they are located on top of the camera. The format for images is JPEG and the digital video format AVI. The camera pictured here is in poor condition due to the broken battery door caches. The camera does work but only with a taped battery door. This camera is worth $1.00 in 2016.
HP: Photosmart 720 camera  HP: Photosmart 7202002  20125.002002 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
HP: Photosmart C30 camera  HP: Photosmart C301998  20122.001998 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (1.0MP)
HP: Photosmart M407 camera  HP: Photosmart M4072004  201210.002004 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014 (4.1MP)
HP: Photosmart R607 camera  HP: Photosmart R6072004  20173.50This digital camera is a 4.1 MP CCD that captures enough detail for photo-quality 12 x 15-inch prints. It has a 3x Pentax optical zoom lens plus 7x digital zoom ((approximately 35 to 105 mm (35 mm equivalent)) and a 1.5-inch LCD display. It also has MPEG-1 video capture with sound, with length limited only by memory stored on SD/MMC cards. It is powered by HP Photosmart R07 rechargeable Lithium-ion battery. The camera also has an optical viewfinder, 4 frames per second shooting speed, built in flash, auto focus mode, 6 cm macro focus range, f2.6 to f4.8 aperture range, 1/2000 of a second maximum shutter speed, 16 seconds minimum shutter speed, 10 second self-timer, video capture mode (24 fps) 640 x 480 VGA, 2320 x 1744 effective sensor pixels, 32 MB internal memory, TTL metering, JPEG still images, HP In-Camera Red-Eye removal, plus ISO Speeds of 100, 200, and 400. The camera was introduced by HP in 2004 with selling points of 21x zoom and 4.1 MP. It sold with software (CD with HP Image Zone) for Windows (up to XP (Professional and Home Editions)) and Macintosh (up to OS 10.2 and higher) based systems. The software has HP In-Camera Panorama Preview that recreates the expanse of wide landscapes from a series of smaller images. Up to five images can be merged in the camera into a seamless preview, allowing you to scroll the entire panorama. When the images are uploaded to a PC, the included software automatically stitches the sequences together. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and worth $1.00 in 2017.
Ihagee: Exa camera  Ihagee: Exa1951-1962  201360.001951-1952 Good condition worth $85.00 in 2014
Ihagee: Exakta VX IIb (Varex IIb) camera  Ihagee: Exakta VX IIb (Varex IIb)1963-1967 201720.00Early Kine Exakta’s had a fixed waist-level viewfinder, but later models, starting with the Exakta Varex, had an interchangeable waist- or eye-level finder. Examat and Travemat Through-the-lens metering prisms were introduced in the mid-1960s. Most controls—including the shutter release and the film wind lever—are on the left-hand side, unlike most other cameras. The film is transported in the opposite direction to other 35mm SLRs. In classic Exakta’s—made between 1936 and 1969—two film canisters can be used, one containing unexposed film and a second into which is wound the exposed film. A sliding knife built into the bottom of the camera can be used to slice the film so that the canister containing the exposed film can be removed while preserving the unexposed film in the main canister. The knife was omitted in the Exakta VX500, one of the last "official" Exakta cameras. The shutter release on classic Exakta’s is on the front of the camera, rather than the top. It is pressed with the left forefinger. This is quite similar to the Praktina design (which adapted it from Ihagee's product), the shutter-release of which was located on the right-hand side of the camera-body front. Later lenses produced for Exakata’s (Ihagee did not produce their own lenses), known either as "automatic" or "semi-automatic" lenses, included a button in an extension that would align over the camera body's shutter release when the lens was mounted. The diaphragm of these lenses remained fully open, providing a bright viewfinder image, until the button was depressed halfway, when the iris would be stopped down to the shooting aperture; pressed farther, the lens button engaged the camera's shutter release button, tripping the shutter. There was a full line of specialized equipment available for these system cameras that included microscope adaptor, extension bellows, stereo attachments, medical attachments and various specialized finder screens. Equipment is fully compatible between all models manufactured between 1936 and 1969. The spelling found on cameras has traditionally been Exakta, but some early Kine-Exakta’s were marked Exacta specifically for marketing in France, Portugal and the U.S., perhaps for copyright reasons; and certainly a great number of American collectors refer to the whole range as the "Exacta." A related line of smaller, simpler cameras was the "Exa" line; these, too, existed in several variations. The Beseler Topcon line of 35mm cameras used the same lens mount as the Exakta. In the early 1970s the Exakta "RTL 1000" was introduced; it accepted the older models' lenses but had its own range of viewfinders, which included a model with through-the-lens light metering. M42 lens mount variants of the RTL line of cameras also appeared under the Practica name. After an economic collapse following Germany's reunification, the successor of the firm (Pentacon, which subsumed Ihagee) is now back in business. This company is not related to the Dutchman Johan Steenbergen, the founder of Ihagee, or with the Exakta, which was discontinued in the 1970s. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $40.00 in 2017.
Ihagee: Exakta VX IIb (Varex IIb) camera  Ihagee: Exakta VX IIb (Varex IIb)1963-1967 201717.00Early Kine Exakta’s had a fixed waist-level viewfinder, but later models, starting with the Exakta Varex, had an interchangeable waist- or eye-level finder. Examat and Travemat Through-the-lens metering prisms were introduced in the mid-1960s. Most controls—including the shutter release and the film wind lever—are on the left-hand side, unlike most other cameras. The film is transported in the opposite direction to other 35mm SLRs. In classic Exakta’s—made between 1936 and 1969—two film canisters can be used, one containing unexposed film and a second into which is wound the exposed film. A sliding knife built into the bottom of the camera can be used to slice the film so that the canister containing the exposed film can be removed while preserving the unexposed film in the main canister. The knife was omitted in the Exakta VX500, one of the last "official" Exakta cameras. The shutter release on classic Exakta’s is on the front of the camera, rather than the top. It is pressed with the left forefinger. This is quite similar to the Praktina design (which adapted it from Ihagee's product), the shutter-release of which was located on the right-hand side of the camera-body front. Later lenses produced for Exakata’s (Ihagee did not produce their own lenses), known either as "automatic" or "semi-automatic" lenses, included a button in an extension that would align over the camera body's shutter release when the lens was mounted. The diaphragm of these lenses remained fully open, providing a bright viewfinder image, until the button was depressed halfway, when the iris would be stopped down to the shooting aperture; pressed farther, the lens button engaged the camera's shutter release button, tripping the shutter. There was a full line of specialized equipment available for these system cameras that included microscope adaptor, extension bellows, stereo attachments, medical attachments and various specialized finder screens. Equipment is fully compatible between all models manufactured between 1936 and 1969. The spelling found on cameras has traditionally been Exakta, but some early Kine-Exakta’s were marked Exacta specifically for marketing in France, Portugal and the U.S., perhaps for copyright reasons; and certainly a great number of American collectors refer to the whole range as the "Exacta." A related line of smaller, simpler cameras was the "Exa" line; these, too, existed in several variations. The Beseler Topcon line of 35mm cameras used the same lens mount as the Exakta. In the early 1970s the Exakta "RTL 1000" was introduced; it accepted the older models' lenses but had its own range of viewfinders, which included a model with through-the-lens light metering. M42 lens mount variants of the RTL line of cameras also appeared under the Practica name. After an economic collapse following Germany's reunification, the successor of the firm (Pentacon, which subsumed Ihagee) is now back in business. This company is not related to the Dutchman Johan Steenbergen, the founder of Ihagee, or with the Exakta, which was discontinued in the 1970s. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $40.00 in 2017.
Imperial Camera: Boy Scout Camera camera  Imperial Camera: Boy Scout Camerac1964 20177.00The Boy Scouts of America Camera was manufactured by the Imperial Camera Corporation of Chicago Illinois in circa 1961. This snap shot camera was constructed of plastic with a molded in eye level view finder and an integrated flash unit. It featured a fixed focus lens, a simple instantaneous shutter, plus two aperture settings to accommodate color or black and white film, and a carrying strap. It used number 127 roll film and AG-1 flash bulbs, sometimes called "jelly bean" bulbs. The flash unit was powered by two AA batteries stored in the camera behind the reflector and accessed with a “common” screw driver. This same design was also sold as the Imperial Lark 127, Rambler Flash camera, and the Tower Pixie 127 by Sears. The only change was the face plate surrounding the lens and film selector. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Imperial Camera: Debonnair camera  Imperial Camera: Debonnairc1964  201012.001960 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Imperial Camera: Delta camera  Imperial Camera: Deltac1964  19997.001964 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Imperial Camera: Impakta X700 camera  Imperial Camera: Impakta X7001971  20081.001971 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Imperial Camera: Insta-Cube 126 camera  Imperial Camera: Insta-Cube 126c1965 20052.001969 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Imperial Camera: Insta-Flash 126 camera  Imperial Camera: Insta-Flash 126c1965 20176.00The camera was introduced c1965 and uses the 126 film cartridges. It is a simple, plastic camera with a folding flash cover. This camera came in a kit that came complete with original camera, 126 film cartridge, AG 1 flash bulbs, Instruction pamphlet, and two AAA batteries. The back of the camera has an “Indoor Exposure Guide” that mentions Film types, corresponding flash bulbs, feet from object, and meters from object. Also on the back is a film view window for counting frames using the film numbered paper backing. Printed clearly under the film view window is “MFG. UNDER EASTMAN KODAK PATENTS BY IMPERIAL CAMERA CORPORATION” and under that is “Chicago, Ill 60612” plus “Msde in USA”. The batteries for the Insta-Flash 126 are located in front of the flash holder and have a difficult top to remove and replace. It has a rotary shutter with only one speed of 1/50 of a second. The camera has no double exposure protection and the lens is close to 35mm. The camera also has an optical view finder, right thumb film advance, and a handy carry strap. The camera pictured here is in poor condition with a sticky shutter and is worth $5.00 in 2017.
Imperial Camera: Instant Load 900 camera  Imperial Camera: Instant Load 900c1965  200410.001963-1970 Good condition in the box worth $20.00 in 2014
Imperial Camera: Magimatic 218 camera  Imperial Camera: Magimatic 218c1970s  19981.001998 Poor condition worth $.050 in 2015 (Shutter)
Imperial Camera: Magimatic X50 camera  Imperial Camera: Magimatic X501975  20155.001975 Good condition worth $15.00 with the box in 2015
Imperial Camera: Magimatic X50 camera  Imperial Camera: Magimatic X501975  20165.00The Magimatic X50 126 Magicube Camera is a simple viewfinder camera for Kodapak film cartridges. It was made by Imperial in the U.S.A. and used Magicubes for flash photography instead of flashcubes or bulbs like earlier Imperial 126 cameras such as the Imperial Instant Load 900, hence its name. The Magicube let cameras such as these have flash capability without needing batteries. The Magimatic X50 has a large thumb wheel film advance, auto flash cub advance, frame view window on the back of the camera, and a handy carry strap. The shutter is approximately 1/100 of a second and the aperture is about 5.6. The camera was introduced in 1975 as a semi copy of the Kodak line of instamatics. The X in the X50 was intended to remind you that you use only the X-type Magicubes. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth with the box $10.00 in 2016.
Imperial Camera: Mark XII Flash camera  Imperial Camera: Mark XII Flashc1964 201310.001950 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Imperial Camera: Mercury Satellite 127 camera  Imperial Camera: Mercury Satellite 127c1964  20168.00This is a variation on the Imperial Satellite 127 from Herbert George, but lacking that model's Color/B&W aperture selector. The Mercury Satellite 127 camera was introduced by Imperial Camera Corporation in 1964. They made cameras under several corporate-tie-in brand names. Many product names of that time were geared toward space related names. This one tied in the Mercury rocket used by United States at that time to launce astronauts and satellites. The camera was also given away in the late 60’s by a select few dealerships to buyers of the Mercury Comet automobile that was produced by Mercury from 1960–1969 and again from 1971-1977. The Mercury Satellite 127 was a box type camera with an optical viewfinder and flash capability. The Imperial Satellite 127 and the Mercury Satellite 127 use the same flash unit. The Mercury also has a plastic lens and a 1/50 of a second shutter. The camera has a right handed shutter release, film winding knob on the bottom back, and a 6 foot to infinity focus range. The flash unit was only available from Imperial through a mail-in form accompanied by a $2.00 check. Imperial would then send you flash attachment, 2 Ray-O-Vac long life batteries, and four M2 flash bulbs. These items were pictured on the form card and the mailing address was “Imperial Camera, P. O. Box 90 Madison Square Station New York 10, N.Y.”. The camera when sold went for about $8.00 in 1964. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 to $15.00 in 2016.
Imperial Camera: Reflex camera  Imperial Camera: Reflexc1964 201311.001950 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Imperial Camera: Satellite II camera  Imperial Camera: Satellite IIc1964 201510.001963 Good condition worth $15.00 with flash unit in 2015
Imperial Camera: Six-Twenty Snapshot camera  Imperial Camera: Six-Twenty Snapshot  20179.00The Imperial Six-Twenty snapshot camera was made in the USA. It’s completely plastic, right down to its little plastic handle. The camera is 2 3/4" wide 3 1/8" deep and 3 3/8" tall (not including the optical viewfinder). There are absolutely no settings to have to fiddle with on this camera. No "b" setting, no sunny / cloudy...nothing. There are two little clips on the sides of the camera that swing aside and the back comes off to expose the film compartment. It takes 12 square 2 ¼ x 2 ¼ inch images of on six-twenty film with about a 28mm lens. The leaf shutter is about 1/50 of a second and a round red window in the back is the frame counter using the numbers on the paper backed film. The camera came in three colors of mint green with green film advance wined knob plus shutter release and handle, white with light grey film advance wined knob plus shutter release and handle, and black with red film advance wined knob plus shutter release and handle. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Imperial Camera: Ultra Flash 110 camera  Imperial Camera: Ultra Flash 110c1980s  20151.001981 poor condition worth $1.00 in 2015 (Battery compartment)
Innovage: Mini Digital camera  Innovage: Mini Digitalc2006  20102.002006 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (640 x 480P)
Jam Cam: Jam Cam 2 camera  Jam Cam: Jam Cam 2c1999  199939.001999 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 )
Jeva: 35 Zoom Ultra camera  Jeva: 35 Zoom Ultrac1989  19935.001989 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Kalimar: Kalimar A camera  Kalimar: Kalimar Ac1955-1964  20159.001955-1964 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Kalimar: Kalimar AW-10 camera  Kalimar: Kalimar AW-10c1970s 201710.00"The Kalimar AW-10 All Weather Camera is a fixed-focus viewfinder camera for use with type No. 110 cartridge 16mm film. It has a built-in flash using two AA batteries. It looks like a waterproof camera but it's actually just an "all weather" splash proof camera and cannot take water pressure of any depth. It was made for Kalimar in the 1970s. The camera has an elaborate way of opening. A knob on either side has a label that reads,” IMPORTANT: Before using read opening instructions on back of camera”. On the top of the camera is a two position switch with ON, OFF, and FLASH. On the back of the camera is instructions reading “IMPORTANT: TO LOAD FILM AND BATTERIES – LIFT SAFETY LOCKS ON SIDE KNOBS AND TWIST SIDE KNOBS UNTIL ARROWS MATCH OPEN POSITION. – SLIGHTLY PULL OUT BACK COVER APPROXIMATELY ¼ INCH UNTIL YOU HEAR CLICK SOUND.—SWING BACK COVER DOWNWARDS. – DO NOT PULL BACK COVER OFF OF CAMERA OR REMOVE CAMERA FROM HOUSING”. The also has a film view window in the back cover, lever film advance, and a carry strap. The camera workings were made in Taiwan and the housing was made in Hong Kong. The 110 cartridge camera uses 100 to 400 ASA film and instructions on the bottom caution you to clean and dry the camera before opening. The camera pictured here has had the batteries left in it and is worth $2.00 for parts in 2017.
Kalimar: Kalimar FF-10 camera  Kalimar: Kalimar FF-10c1980s  20163.501985 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2016
Kalimar: Kalimar FF-10 camera  Kalimar: Kalimar FF-10c1980s  20166.001985 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2016
Kalimar: Kalimar LX-9 camera  Kalimar: Kalimar LX-9c1980s 20163.00The camera has a focus-free 35mm plastic lens and a single fixed aperture f8. It lacks multiple exposure capability and the shutter works only with the lens cover opened. The LX-9 is considered a focus free point and shoot from the 80’s and in some corners it is listed as a toy camera. Some of the colors it came in are yellow, pink, and blue. The camera also has a two conductor hot shoe, frame counter, fold down rewind crank, rewind release button on the bottom of the camera body, built in lens cover, right thumb film advance wheel, optical viewfinder, and a handy carry strap. The camera when new came with a flash unit to match, instruction book, one year guarantee, and a case. Inside the film compartment a label tells you “for best results use ISO 200”. This camera does have a small following like the Diana due to the anomalies found after developing film shot in it. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Kalimar: Kalimar Precision Zoom camera  Kalimar: Kalimar Precision Zoomc1990s  20165.001990's New condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Kalimar: Kalimar Precision Zoom camera  Kalimar: Kalimar Precision Zoomc1990s  20163.50Kalimar got its start in the 1950's importing Aires 35 cameras from Japan for sale in the US. Eventually Kalimar would be a distributor for cameras and accessories from most of the camera making world, until it was bought out by Tiffen in 1999. At some point Kalimar put its name on the 35mm Kalimar Precision Zoom. The Kalimar Precision Zoom is unusual in that it is the only cheap plastic camera that I have seen with a zoom lens. I would guess it was made in the 1990's since that is when a zoom lens became the standard lens for many cameras. Other than its zoom lens the Kalimar Precision Zoom is a standard toy camera. It has one shutter speed (about 1/50 of a second) and one aperture around f11. It doesn't need a battery (one AA Alkaline) unless you want to use the flash. The Precision Zoom (35 to 55mm) does seem to be more solidly built than most toy cameras. It also has a flash ready LED, flash on/off switch, thumb film advance wheel, fold-up film rewind crank lever, and came with a handy carry strap. The kit came with a Kodak Photolife Alkaline AA battery, Kodak MAX 35mm 400 speed 12 exposure film roll, free guide to better picture book, and the camera. The one pictured here is Good condition and worth $8.00 in 2016.
Kalimar: Kalimar Spirit SP camera  Kalimar: Kalimar Spirit SPc1990s  20151990's good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Kalimar: Kalimar SR300 camera  Kalimar: Kalimar SR300c1974-1980  201515.001972-1984 Poor condition worth $10.00 for parts in 2015 (film advance lever springs back)
Kalimar: Kalimar Superview 35 camera  Kalimar: Kalimar Superview 352004  20175.00With the Kalimar SuperView 35 camera takes quick & easy pictures with quality results. This focus-free point & shoot camera features a 200% oversized, extra bright viewfinder and a 28mm multi-element lens. The camera has an auto sensor & fill flash with red-eye reduction. Powered by one AA battery, and the lens cover is also power off. It comes with a convenient wrist strap and was introduced in 1999. The cameras built in lens cover slide switch opens the cover and turns on the flash when placed in the far position. The camera has a flash ready light near the viewfinder, right thumb film advance, frame counter on the top of the camera, fold down rewind crank handle plus release button, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount. The Tiffen Company LLC based in Chesterfield Missouri bought Kalimar in 1999 and was made in China. The camera was sold alone and in a kit with a roll of Kodak film one Kodak AA Battery, $10.00 worth of Kodak coupons, camera instructions, and sold for $49.00. They also released a Kalimar SuperView Automatic 35 with the same body but motorized and introduced in 2004. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Kalimar: Kalimar TW-77 camera  Kalimar: Kalimar TW-77c1992  200310.001992 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kellogg: Corn Flakes camera  Kellogg: Corn Flakesc1990  2/12/20007.95110 Kellogg's key-chain camera from 1990 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kellogg: Corn Flakes camera  Kellogg: Corn Flakesc1990  20138.00This advertising camera is an actual working 110 cartridge film miniature Camera plus Key Chain, left over from a 1989-90 promotion. It comes in a colorful small box ornamented with the distinctive Kellogg’s Corn Flakes Rooster. You could get one in 1990 for $4.95 and 2 box tops from a Kellogg’s product. For the same price plus shipping you can buy it on Amazon in 2016. It has the instruction sheet, the rooster box, the camera plus keychain, roll of 110 film, and it all comes packed in its original shipping tube. Yes it’s a complete 110 Camera Outfit Retro Style. The only feature it has is the fold down view finder frame on the top. The shutter is about 1/60 of a second and the lens somewhere around 40mm. The camera was meant for kids and had light leaks as all these types of minimalist cameras do. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $5.00 in 2016.
Keystone: Auto-Instant 115 X camera  Keystone: Auto-Instant 115 Xc1975  20082.00This is a 126 film cartridge camera introduced in 1975 that used the self contained flashcube so it needed no batteries. It has a thumb lever film advance that would turn the flashcube to the next side. Once you used all four sides you had to remember to replace the flashcube with a new one. The camera is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016. The flashcube was called Magicube (or X-Cube) and was superficially similar to the original Flashcube. However, the Magicube did not require electrical power- each bulb was set off by a plastic pin in the cube mount that released a cocked spring wire within the cube. This wire, in turn, struck a primer tube, at the base of the bulb, which contained a fulminate. The fulminate ignited shredded zirconium foil in the flash and, thus, a battery was not required.
Keystone: Auto-Instant 115 X camera  Keystone: Auto-Instant 115 Xc1975  20165.00This is a 126 film cartridge camera introduced in 1975 that used the self contained flashcube so it needed no batteries. It has a thumb lever film advance that would turn the flashcube to the next side. Once you used all four sides you had to remember to replace the flashcube with a new one. The camera is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016. The flashcube was called Magicube (or X-Cube) and was superficially similar to the original Flashcube. However, the Magicube did not require electrical power- each bulb was set off by a plastic pin in the cube mount that released a cocked spring wire within the cube. This wire, in turn, struck a primer tube, at the base of the bulb, which contained a fulminate. The fulminate ignited shredded zirconium foil in the flash and, thus, a battery was not required.
Keystone: Easy Shot 1 camera  Keystone: Easy Shot 1c1980s  20164.50This 1980s Keystone Regency camera was made in USA. It has all the bells and whistles of a camera of that era. The camera has a two position selector switch for ASA setting for 100 to 200 ASA and 400 to 1000 ASA. It also has a built in lens cover that seconds for an on/off switch, built in flash that slides out to turn it on, a flash ready LED, optical viewfinder, frame counter, Regency 38mm lens, a right thumb film advance wheel, film view window in the back, film fold down rewind crank in the bottom of the camera, a battery compartment that takes two AA batteries, shutter release button, and a handy carry string strap. The camera is primarily made of plastic and labeled as a focus free camera. The Keystone brand or Berkey Keystone is a division of Berkey Photo Inc. of White Plains, New York, USA. There was also a Keystone range of cine cameras. During World War II, Keystone also manufactured aerial cameras for the military. The camera pictured here is in poor condition due to a non-working flash and for this reason it is worth $3.00 in 2016.
Keystone: Easy Shot 2 camera  Keystone: Easy Shot 2c1980s  20162.001980's poor condition worth $4.00 in 2016
Keystone: Easy Shot 600 camera  Keystone: Easy Shot 600c1985  20092.501985 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Keystone: EverFlash 10 camera  Keystone: EverFlash 10c1971  20151.001971 poor esthetic condition but works and worth $1.00 in 2015
Keystone: EverFlash 10 camera  Keystone: EverFlash 10c1971  20165.00This 1971 camera was promoted as “the amazing camera that never needs flash cubes. Makes its own flashes!” and that is the reason for Everflash in this series of cameras name. The camera uses two AA preferably alkaline batteries to power the built in flash unit. The camera takes 126 cartridge film, it has a 40mm f8 Keytar Color Corrected lens, an Indoor/Outdoor aperture switch, an On/Off flash switch, flash ready indicator light, a right thumb film advance wheel, optical viewfinder, a film count view window, a selector switch for apertures of f8 for indoor flash photos plus f11 for daytime outdoor photos, automatic film stop with double exposure interlock, and a handy carry strap. The camera come in a brightly colored box loaded with advertisement and inside you found the four page manual with a fold out page plus a small light green card with dealer instructions. The dealer instructions prompted them to “REMOVE THIS CARD BEFORE LOADING CAMERA WITH FILM”, and has a step by step procedure for demonstrating properly. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Keystone: EverFlash 1040 camera  Keystone: EverFlash 10401992-1995  20053.501987 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Keystone: EverFlash 1040 camera  Keystone: EverFlash 10401992-1995  20035.001987 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Keystone: EverFlash 1070 camera  Keystone: EverFlash 1070c1987  20150.501987 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2015 (batteries leaked)
Keystone: EverFlash Funshooter 80 camera  Keystone: EverFlash Funshooter 80c1980s  20093.001990 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Keystone: EverFlash XR 108 camera  Keystone: EverFlash XR 108c1970s  19982.001985 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Keystone: EverFlash XR 308 camera  Keystone: EverFlash XR 308c1970s 20173.50Keystone was quite a competitor for Vivitar, Fujica, and many other 110 camera manufacturers. They copied many of the features of these other cameras, and marketed their own version at very attractive prices. The XR308 Tele-Everflash is a good example. In size, features, and performance it is similar to several other 110 models, such as the Vivitar 815. Like the Vivitar, it came with a normal and a tele lens and a built-in flash. It accepts 100 and 400 ASA film and uses two AA batteries. It has a flash-ready light and several other convenience features. This camera was first introduced in 1995 and sold for about $35.00. The XR308 came with two different label designs on the top. One with an understated markings and the other with XR308 in very large lettering. Both cameras are identical in every other way. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $12.00 in 2017.
Keystone: EverFlash XR 308 camera  Keystone: EverFlash XR 308c1970s 20045.001988 Fine condition worth $12.00 in 2014
Keystone: EverFlash XR 308 camera  Keystone: EverFlash XR 308c1970s 20162.00Keystone was quite a competitor for Vivitar, Fujica, and many other 110 camera manufacturers. They copied many of the features of other cameras, and marketed their own version at very attractive prices. The XR308 Tele-Everflash is a good example. In size, features, and performance it is similar to several other 110 models, such as the Vivitar 815. Like the Vivitar, it came with a normal and a tele lens and a built-in flash. It accepts 100, 200, plus 400 speed film and uses two AA batteries. It has a flash-ready button and several other convenient features. This camera was first introduced in 1995 and sold for about $35 but now worth $15 in original box with instruction manual. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and worth $.25 for parts in 2016.
Keystone: Pocket-Matic 101 camera  Keystone: Pocket-Matic 101c1974  20142.001977 fine condition worth $12.00 in 2014
Keystone: Wizard XF 1000 camera  Keystone: Wizard XF 1000c1977  20053.501976 Poor condition worth $1.00 in 2014
Keystone: Wizard XF 1500 camera  Keystone: Wizard XF 1500c1977  20121.001975 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
King: Regula (1951) camera  King: Regula (1951)1951-1953 201729.00This optical viewfinder 35mm film camera was produced from 1951 to 1953. It has a lever wind film advance (also known as rapid winder or Schnell-Transport (ST)), camera. The model name is marked inside the camera and all King Regula I series models had identical bodies but models differ by the shutter and lens combination. The models are the Regula I-A, Regula I-B, Regula I-C, Regula I-Ca, Regula I-D, Regula I-E, Regula I-F, Regula I-P, Regula I-Po, and the Regula II. The I-F model has a 50mm 4.5 Regulon lens with a Vario shutter with speeds of 25, 75, 200 plus B. The frame counter uses the film pin wheel inside the film track to advance. The model I-F with its Regulon lens and Vario shutter was the least expensive of this line selling for $39.50 in 1955. The camera has a cold accessory shoe with a flash socket above the lens. The focusing range is 3 feet to infinity and is used by turning the front lens ring assembly. The covering is the herring bone pattern leatherette typical of all King Regula I models. They also have a manually cocked shutter and a wind knob for rewind with a release lever. This particular camera has a design feature that a few of the cameras lacked and that is an angled viewfinder casing to hide plus meet with the accessory shoe. It also has the King KG logo embossed on it. As well as the model designation inside the camera you will also find the six digit serial number stamped and easy to read. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $40.00 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Advantix 1600 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix 16001997-1999  20095.001997-1999 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix 2000 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix 20001996-1998  199960.001996-1998 Good condition worth 7.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix 3200AF camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix 3200AF1996-1999  20165.001996-1999 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Advantix 4100ix camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix 4100ixc1995  20115.001995 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix 4100ix camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix 4100ixc1995  200210.001995 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix 4100ix camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix 4100ixc1995  1995 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix C400 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix C400c2000 20145.002000 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix C400 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix C400c2000 20050.002000 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014 (Battery compartment don't close)
Kodak Eastman: Advantix C400 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix C400c2000 200710.002000 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix C400 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix C400c2000  20152.002000 poor condition worth $1.00 in 2015 (heavy scratches on lens cover)
Kodak Eastman: Advantix C700 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix C7002001  200510.002001 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix F300 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix F300c2001  20085.002001 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix F300 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix F300c2001  200910.002001 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Advantix F600 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix F600c2001  20156.002001 Fine condition worth $25.00 with the original box and manual in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Advantix F600 camera  Kodak Eastman: Advantix F600c2001  20165.002001 Fine condition worth $25.00 with the original box and manual in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Autographic Junior No.3A camera  Kodak Eastman: Autographic Junior No.3A1918-1927 2012$20.001918-1927 is a large format folding bed camera for A 122 autographic rollfilm cartridge good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Automatic 35 camera  Kodak Eastman: Automatic 351959-1964 19928.001959-1964 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Baby Brownie camera  Kodak Eastman: Baby Brownie1934-1941 20129.001936-1952 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Baby Brownie Special camera  Kodak Eastman: Baby Brownie Special1939-1954 201010.001934-1941 US 1948-1952 UK Good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Baby Brownie Special camera  Kodak Eastman: Baby Brownie Special1939-1954  201515.001934-1941 US 1948-1952 UK good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Baby Brownie Special camera  Kodak Eastman: Baby Brownie Special1939-1954  20165.00 The Baby Brownie Special was introduced in 1939 and discontinued in 1954. The camera has a molded Bakelite plastic body with a direct vision optical finder. The models for export had a button allowing brief time exposures. This camera was sold as an upgrade from the Baby Brownie. It also used the 127 roll film producing a 1 5/8 x 2 ½ inch negative. For only $0.25 more than Baby Brownie price of $1.00, one could have a direct optical view finder and an easy-to-use shutter release. Just a $1.25 for a working camera like the Baby Brownie Special, even in the 1940's and 1950's that is a good deal. No record of how many were produced here in the US but it had to be in the hundreds of thousands if not millions. The camera has a Meniscus lens and a rotary shutter. Most of the info in this blurb was obtained from The Brownie Camera Page. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Bantam f8 camera  Kodak Eastman: Bantam f81938-1942 201535.001938 fine condition worth $65.00 in 2015 (has original box and instruction book)
Kodak Eastman: Bantam Range Finder camera  Kodak Eastman: Bantam Range Finder1953-1957 199410.001953 Good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Beau Brownie No 2 camera  Kodak Eastman: Beau Brownie No 21930-1933 201562.001930-1933 Good condition worth $75.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Beau Brownie No 2 camera  Kodak Eastman: Beau Brownie No 21930-1933 201715.00Kodak's Beau Brownie exists in two models: N°2 Beau Brownie for 120 film and the slightly larger No2A Beau Brownie (for 116 film). The two models appeared in October 1930 and disappeared in 1933; although, the green and rose models were withdrawn in 1931. Their front faces are made of two-tone enamel. The geometrical figures are typical Art Deco and credited to Walter Dorwin Teague. The possible colors are black/brown, rose/pink, blue/light blue, green/green blue, tan/light tan and all black. The metal body is covered with imitation leather. The only adjustments were I & B shutter speeds and three choices of aperture, given by sliders on the top edge. It has a 1/50 of a second shutter, red frame count window in the back, leather handle, film advance winder that pulled out to release the internal film mechanism, two ¼” 20 thread tripod sockets, and two brilliant viewfinders for portrait plus landscape. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $45.00 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bullet camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bullet1957-1964 20144.001957-1964 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bullet camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bullet1957-1964 199610.001957-1964 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bullet II camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bullet II1961-1968 20102.001961-1968 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bulls-Eye camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bulls-Eye1954-1960 19942.001954-1960 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bulls-Eye camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Bulls-Eye1954-1960 19905.001954-1960 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Fiesta camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Fiesta1962-1966  201515.001962-1966 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Flash 20 camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Flash 201959-1962 201410.00The Brownie Flash 20 Camera has a molded blue plastic body featuring a direct vision optical viewfinder and a built-in flashgun for cap less flashbulbs. This fun camera offers more control than many "point and shoot" Brownie cameras. It offers 3 aperture settings for different lighting conditions, a simple focusing ring, and an effective built-in flash. With a big 2 ¼” x 2 ¼” (6cm X 6cm) image produced, these could be contact printed or enlarged quite a bit with excellent results. The camera was introduced in April of 1959 and discontinued October of 1962. The Rollfilm size was 620 and with a Meniscus f/11 three aperture lens this single shutter speed camera originally sold for $14.00. Kodak itself does not know how many were constructed or sold word wide. The camera was manufactured here in the USA but was assembled in the UK from 1960 to 1961. The camera pictured is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2014.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Flash Six-20 camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Flash Six-201946-1955 199812.00The Brownie Flash Six-20 camera has a metal box body and has a rather strange shape. It features an optical direct vision finder, a built-in close-up lens, and time exposure capability. It accepts a cumbersome flashgun and was renamed from the Six-20 Flash Brownie Camera. The camera was quite a popular camera, in part because of its indestructability. Though it lacks multiple apertures it has features like a built-in portrait lens, multiple exposure guard, and tripod socket. It even has a little tab that when folded out acts to level this odd shaped camera. It used 620 roll film that produced a picture size of 2 ¼” x 3 ¼” and was manufactured in the US. It was introduced in July of 1946 and discontinued in January of 1955. The camera has a Meniscus lens, rotary shutter and sold for $6.00. This information was gleaned from THE BROWNIE CAMERA PAGE. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $25.00 with the flash unit.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Flashmite 20 camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Flashmite 201960-1965  201510.001960 - 1965 good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye1949-1951 20004.00The Brownie Hawkeye is a Bakelite camera taking 2 1/3” x 2 1/3” (6x6cm) images on 620 film. It was made in the USA, Canada, and France by Kodak, from 1949 to1961. There were also examples labelled "Brownie Fiesta" and Kodak used this name in 1962 to label another camera. The original design did not have a flash facility, but the Flash model was added in 1950 and labeled Kodak Brownie Flash in France and Canadian. There were two lens attachments sold for the Hawkeye, one was the Kodak Close-Up No. 13 and the other was the Kodak Cloud Filter No. 13. The camera has an oversized brilliant viewfinder and is utilized by holding the camera at waist-level. The camera also has a Meniscus lens, rotary shutter, and an Iconic carry handle. The Hawkeye and Hawkeye Flash is touted as one of the most popular Brownie cameras made although that number is not known. The original suggested retail price was $5.50 and $7.00 for the flash type. This sturdy, reasonably priced, and beautiful camera was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey, the designer of many other popular Kodak cameras. This is in good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model1950-1961 201110.00The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was very popular back in the 1950s, and sold like hot-cakes for over a decade. They were cheap, easy to use, and produced sharp 3 1/2” x 3 1/2” prints taken from about 10' to infinity with the non-focusing, internal lens. Baby Boomers and even younger people are getting acquainted with the camera their parents or grandparents used. The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was made for 620 medium format film, which is no longer commercially available. 120 film is still available, and is exactly the same as 620 film, the only difference is in the size of the spools and the 120 film can be transferred to the 620 spool. The camera was introduced in 1950 for $7.00 and the last one was made in July of 1961. A non-synchronized model was produced from May 1949 to November of 1951 known as simply the Brownie Hawkeye and the camera was also produced in France with the name Brownie Flash Camera. It has a Meniscus lens, Rotary shutter, and accepts a wide range of Kodak pin and screw flash attachments. This beautiful camera was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey, the designer of many popular Kodak cameras of that era. The camera pictured above is worth $5 to $10 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model1950-1961 199310.00The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was very popular back in the 1950s, and sold like hot-cakes for over a decade. They were cheap, easy to use, and produced sharp 3 1/2” x 3 1/2” prints taken from about 10' to infinity with the non-focusing, internal lens. Baby Boomers and even younger people are getting acquainted with the camera their parents or grandparents used. The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was made for 620 medium format film, which is no longer commercially available. 120 film is still available, and is exactly the same as 620 film, the only difference is in the size of the spools and the 120 film can be transferred to the 620 spool. The camera was introduced in 1950 for $7.00 and the last one was made in July of 1961. A non-synchronized model was produced from May 1949 to November of 1951 known as simply the Brownie Hawkeye and the camera was also produced in France with the name Brownie Flash Camera. It has a Meniscus lens, Rotary shutter, and accepts a wide range of Kodak pin and screw flash attachments. This beautiful camera was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey, the designer of many popular Kodak cameras of that era. The camera pictured above is worth $5 to $10 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model1950-1961 20005.00The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was very popular back in the 1950s, and sold like hot-cakes for over a decade. They were cheap, easy to use, and produced sharp 3 1/2” x 3 1/2” prints taken from about 10' to infinity with the non-focusing, internal lens. Baby Boomers and even younger people are getting acquainted with the camera their parents or grandparents used. The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was made for 620 medium format film, which is no longer commercially available. 120 film is still available, and is exactly the same as 620 film, the only difference is in the size of the spools and the 120 film can be transferred to the 620 spool. The camera was introduced in 1950 for $7.00 and the last one was made in July of 1961. A non-synchronized model was produced from May 1949 to November of 1951 known as simply the Brownie Hawkeye and the camera was also produced in France with the name Brownie Flash Camera. It has a Meniscus lens, Rotary shutter, and accepts a wide range of Kodak pin and screw flash attachments. This beautiful camera was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey, the designer of many popular Kodak cameras of that era. The camera pictured above is worth $5 to $10 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model1950-1961 20128.00The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was very popular back in the 1950s, and sold like hot-cakes for over a decade. They were cheap, easy to use, and produced sharp 3 1/2” x 3 1/2” prints taken from about 10' to infinity with the non-focusing, internal lens. Baby Boomers and even younger people are getting acquainted with the camera their parents or grandparents used. The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was made for 620 medium format film, which is no longer commercially available. 120 film is still available, and is exactly the same as 620 film, the only difference is in the size of the spools and the 120 film can be transferred to the 620 spool. The camera was introduced in 1950 for $7.00 and the last one was made in July of 1961. A non-synchronized model was produced from May 1949 to November of 1951 known as simply the Brownie Hawkeye and the camera was also produced in France with the name Brownie Flash Camera. It has a Meniscus lens, Rotary shutter, and accepts a wide range of Kodak pin and screw flash attachments. This beautiful camera was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey, the designer of many popular Kodak cameras of that era. The camera pictured above is worth $5 to $10 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model1950-1961 20135.00The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was very popular back in the 1950s, and sold like hot-cakes for over a decade. They were cheap, easy to use, and produced sharp 3 1/2” x 3 1/2” prints taken from about 10' to infinity with the non-focusing, internal lens. Baby Boomers and even younger people are getting acquainted with the camera their parents or grandparents used. The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was made for 620 medium format film, which is no longer commercially available. 120 film is still available, and is exactly the same as 620 film, the only difference is in the size of the spools and the 120 film can be transferred to the 620 spool. The camera was introduced in 1950 for $7.00 and the last one was made in July of 1961. A non-synchronized model was produced from May 1949 to November of 1951 known as simply the Brownie Hawkeye and the camera was also produced in France with the name Brownie Flash Camera. It has a Meniscus lens, Rotary shutter, and accepts a wide range of Kodak pin and screw flash attachments. This beautiful camera was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey, the designer of many popular Kodak cameras of that era. The camera pictured above is worth $5 to $10 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model1950-1961  20173.00The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was very popular back in the 1950s, and sold like hot-cakes for over a decade. They were cheap, easy to use, and produced sharp 3 1/2” x 3 1/2” prints taken from about 10' to infinity with the non-focusing, internal lens. Baby Boomers and even younger people are getting acquainted with the camera their parents or grandparents used. The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera was made for 620 medium format film, which is no longer commercially available. 120 film is still available, and is exactly the same as 620 film, the only difference is in the size of the spools and the 120 film can be transferred to the 620 spool. The camera was introduced in 1950 for $7.00 and the last one was made in July of 1961. A non-synchronized model was produced from May 1949 to November of 1951 known as simply the Brownie Hawkeye and the camera was also produced in France with the name Brownie Flash Camera. It has a Meniscus lens, Rotary shutter, and accepts a wide range of Kodak pin and screw flash attachments. This beautiful camera was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey, the designer of many popular Kodak cameras of that era. The camera pictured above is worth $5 to $10 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Holiday camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Holiday1953-1957 19995.00Designed and marketed for children, the Brownie was named after the characters created by Palmer Cox, a famous children's author. They were as well known in the 1880's as Mickey is today. Little did they know at Kodak that the Brownie camera would be so eagerly sought after? This very popular Brownie series has a molded brown and tan plastic body with an optical direct vision finder. The camera was produced between 1953 and 1957, uses 127 size film and originally sold for $5.00. There is no way of knowing of how many Kodak made but safe to say in the millions. The camera had a Kodet lens from 1953 to 1955 and a Dakon plastic lens from 1955 to 1962. This camera like many others was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey. The non-flash Brownie Holiday camera is the retail version of the Brownie Bullet, which was a promotional camera. Additionally the same model series was named the Camara Brownie Chiquita, Brownie Chiquita Camera and Camara Brownie Chiquita Flash which were manufactured for the Brazilian market. Much of this info was obtained from the Brownie camera page. This camera pictured is in X-Fine condition and comes with the original box and instruction booklet. It is worth $25.00 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Holiday camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Holiday1953-1957  20165.00Designed and marketed for children, the Brownie was named after the characters created by Palmer Cox, a famous children's author. They were as well known in the 1880's as Mickey is today. Little did they know at Kodak that the Brownie camera would be so eagerly sought after? This very popular Brownie series has a molded brown and tan Bakelite body with an optical direct vision finder. The camera was produced between 1953 and 1957, uses 127 size film and originally sold for $5.00. There is no way of knowing of how many Kodak made but safe to say in the millions. The camera had a Kodet lens from 1953 to 1955 and a Dakon plastic lens from 1955 to 1962. This camera like many others was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey. The non-flash Brownie Holiday camera is the retail version of the Brownie Bullet, which was a promotional camera. Additionally the same model series was named the Camara Brownie Chiquita, Brownie Chiquita Camera and Camara Brownie Chiquita Flash which were manufactured for the Brazilian market. Much of this info was obtained from the Brownie camera page. This camera pictured above with a Dakon lens is in Fine condition and is worth $15.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Holiday Flash camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Holiday Flash1954-1962 199312.00Designed and marketed for children, the Brownie was named after the characters created by Palmer Cox, a famous children's author. They were as well known in the 1880's as Mickey is today. Little did they know at Kodak that the Brownie camera would be so eagerly sought after? This very popular Brownie series has a molded brown and tan plastic body with an optical direct vision finder. The camera was produced between 1953 and 1957, uses 127 size film and originally sold for $5.00. There is no way of knowing of how many Kodak made but safe to say in the millions. The camera had a Kodet lens from 1953 to 1955 and a Dakon plastic lens from 1955 to 1962. This camera like many others was designed by Arthur H. Crapsey. The non-flash Brownie Holiday camera is the retail version of the Brownie Bullet, which was a promotional camera. Additionally the same model series was named the Camara Brownie Chiquita, Brownie Chiquita Camera and Camara Brownie Chiquita Flash which were manufactured for the Brazilian market. Much of this info was obtained from the Brownie camera page. . This camera pictured is in X-Fine condition and comes with the original box and instruction booklet. It is worth $25.00 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.0 Model A (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.0 Model A (US)1914-1935  19989.001914-1935 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2 Model D (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2 Model D (US)1901-1933  20166.00This box camera had a long run and was introduced in 1901 then discontinued in 1935 with the Model D being released in 1914. The No 2 also was manufactured in the UK from 1928 till the end date of production. The number of cameras sold and produced is not known but over 2,500,000 before 1921. The camera uses 120 roll film to give you a 2 ¼” by 3 ¼” picture. The No.2 Brownie is significant in that it was the first camera to use 120 roll film. It started production being made of leatherette covered card and, from 1924, changed to a metal box. A very simple camera with a very dependable rotary shutter. It has two sliding mechanisms on the top, one for a bulb, or time setting, and the other for a choice of 3 apertures (about f8, f11, and f16) that sit in front of the Meniscus lens. It also has two small reflecting finders for vertical (portrait) or horizontal (Landscape) shots. The original price was $2.00 with the aluminum model F selling for $2.75 and the color models for $2.50. The 100 year old camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2016. Variations: (1901-early 1902) detachable winding keys similar to The Brownie camera (Early 1902) fixed pull-out winding key (Feb 1904) Model B; fine grain leatherette covering replaced by coarser grain; metal eyelets fitted to lens and finder windows (Apr 1907) Model C; spool centers fitted (Dec 1914 Model D) during the run of this model the sliding latch for hinged back was replaced by a spring catch; mask in back omitted (June 1917) Film tension springs bearing on spools ends instead of center (Dec 1917) metal name plate on back (Mar 1919) Model E; metal film carrier instead of wood, card outer casting (Mar 1920) Trigger guard fitted (Feb 1924) Model F; aluminum case replaced card; tripod sockets added; no trigger guard; finer grain leatherette covering (Apr 1929-1933) US models in five color finishes - Red, grey, green, blue, brown - as well as black (1929-1933) UK models in six color finishes - Red, grey, green, blue, brown, claret - as well as black (Nov 1930) UK model in special Modernist finish, black with slight relief, wax-like feel; made only in limited numbers for the Christmas season. (From 1931) knob replaced winding key; 1931 models had rectangular line decoration of earlier models; thereafter plain finish (1934-1935) UK models in two color finishes - grey or black. Silver model produced for Silver Jubilee of King George V in 1935. (Most of the information gleaned from “The Brownie Camera Page”)
Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2A Model B (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2A Model B (US)1911-1933 20155.001907-1924 good condition worth $8.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2A Model B (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2A Model B (US)1911-1933 19992.501907-1924 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2A Model C (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2A Model C (US)1924-1933  201510.001924-1933 good condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2A Model C (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie No.2A Model C (US)1924-1933 201712.00One of the interesting features for the 1907 Brownie 2A Model C is its two viewfinders – one for portrait mode and another one for landscape mode. Along with two viewfinders, in 1924 it was given two tripod ¼ inch 20 thread bushes so that you can mount the camera on a tripod in either portrait or landscape acclimation. The camera has two shutter settings of B and 1/50th of a second depending on the age and condition of the rotary shutter. The “B” mode is engaged with a slide tab on top of the camera that you pull out. When you lift the “B” tab, the shutter release will keep the shutter open until you switch it back to where you started in either direction. The shutter release also has no double exposure protection and it is possible to take multipole exposure on the same frame. The other pull tab next to the “B” tab is the aperture setting. It’s a metal slide plate with three holes in it and you can feel a stop at each location. The instructions just call the openings “Small”, “Medium”, and “Large”. The actual apertures are close to f/11, f/16, and f/22. The No. 2A Brownie was designed for 116 film that is no longer available, but you can use 120 film with some work. The focus range of the Meniscus lens is 2 meters (6 1/2 feet) to infinity but Kodak did sell a close up lens that could be fitted. The camera had a long production run, from 1907 to 1933 in the US, Canada, and from 1930 to 1933 it was manufactured in the UK. In Aug 1909-Eyelets were fitted to the lens opening and finder windows on the side and top. In 1920 the camera was available in five colors (brown, blue, claret, green, and black) produced at all three locations. The original retail price was $3.00 with Aluminum models from 1924 on selling for $3.75 and color models from 1920 on selling for $4.00. The numbers made are estimated to be 2.1 million before 1921 and at least that many more till the end of production. The one pictured here was made after 1924, is in Good condition, and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Reflex 20 camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Reflex 201959-1966  19986.001959-1966 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Reflex Synchro camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Reflex Synchro1941-1952  19967.001941-1952 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie StarFlash camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie StarFlash1957-1965  19932.001957-1965 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie StarFlash camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie StarFlash1957-1965  19925.001957-1965 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starflex camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starflex1957-1964  201011.001957-1964 Fine condition worth $25.00 with the flash unit in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starflex camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starflex1957-1964  200110.001957-1964 Poor condition worth $5.00 for parts in 2014 (shutter problem)
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starlet (UK) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starlet (UK)1953-1956  19978.001952-1954 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starmatic camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starmatic1959-1961  200710.001959-1963 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starmeter camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starmeter1960-1965  20155.001960-1965 fine condition worth $20.00 with flash in 2015. The camera is essentially a point-and-shoot, but you do have some control over the exposure. Once you set the ISO (ASA) dial that is integrated in the meter dial, you read the exposure value indicated by the top-mounted meter and transfer this to the exposure value dial on the top of the lens assembly, then take your shot. The camera has a fixed shutter speed of about 1/50 of a second. Adjusting the dial changes the aperture of the lens only from 12 to 16. These settings do cover most daylight conditions (from overcast to bright sunlight), which is really what this camera is built for. The Kodak Starmeter kit does include a “Supermite” flash that uses AG1 flash bulbs and it uses two AA batteries accessed with a common screw driver by removing the metal back cover. The Starmeter was introduced in April of 1960 and discontinued in November of 1965. It was made in both the USA and Canada but the numbers of them is unknown but is near a million. The camera uses 127 roll film for a picture size of 1 5/8 X 1 5/8". Some of the cameras other features are a Kodar f/8 lens, rotary shutter, built in selenium meter, screw with pins flash contacts, and the camera sold for an original price of $19.95.
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starmite camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Starmite1960-1963  20155.001960-1967 poor condition worth $2.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Super 27 camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Super 271961-1965  20156.001961-1965 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Super 27 camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Super 271961-1965  20168.001961-1965 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Target Six-16 (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Target Six-16 (US)1941-1951  20125.001946-1951 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Target Six-20 (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Target Six-20 (US)1941-1952  19907.001941-1952 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Target Six-20 (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Target Six-20 (US)1941-1952  20155.001941-1946 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Twin 20 camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Twin 201959-1964  19908.001959-1964 Good condition worth $20.00 with the flash unit in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Brownie Vecta camera  Kodak Eastman: Brownie Vecta1963-1966 201521.001963-1966 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Bull"s Eye No.2 camera  Kodak Eastman: Bull"s Eye No.21896-1913  201543.001896-1913 Good condition worth $60.00
Kodak Eastman: Bullet camera  Kodak Eastman: Bullet1936-1942  200112.001936-1942 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Cameo camera  Kodak Eastman: Cameo1993-1995  19992.001994 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Cameo Motor EX camera  Kodak Eastman: Cameo Motor EX1995  20155.001995 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Cameo Motordrive camera  Kodak Eastman: Cameo Motordrive1993-1995  20081.501993 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Cameo Panoramic (AFM) camera  Kodak Eastman: Cameo Panoramic (AFM)1994-1996  20155.001994-1996 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Cameo Zoom Plus camera  Kodak Eastman: Cameo Zoom Plus1993  20093.001993-1995 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Cartridge Hawk-Eye No.2 Model B camera  Kodak Eastman: Cartridge Hawk-Eye No.2 Model B1926-1934  20163.001916 good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Cartridge Hawk-Eye No.2 Model C camera  Kodak Eastman: Cartridge Hawk-Eye No.2 Model C1926-1934  20155.001926-1934 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Cartridge Premo No.2 camera  Kodak Eastman: Cartridge Premo No.21916-1923  201235.001916-1922 good condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Cartridge Premo No.2A camera  Kodak Eastman: Cartridge Premo No.2A1916-1923 20155.001916-1922 poor condition and worth $5.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Challenger camera  Kodak Eastman: Challenger1986-1990  20165.00The Kodak Tele Disc was introduced in the middle of the short-lived disc camera era in order to spice up Kodak’s lineup. Interestingly, the Tele Disc has two lens choices: a normal 12.5mm f/4 and 22mm f/5.6 telephoto. Unlike the Ricoh R1 which relies on the insertion of additional optical elements to modify the focal length, the Tele Disc actually has two separate lenses. Extending the flash rotates the telephoto lens into place and also swaps in a new viewfinder. The Kodak Challenger was introduced in 1986 and discontinued in 1990 at the end of the disc era that started in 1982 and ended in 1998 with the discontinuation of production of the film by Kodak. Kodak’s inventory of disc film ran out in 1999. The Challenger is a 'premium' version of the Disc 3600 and not as easy to find as one might anticipate. The shutter speed is 1/300 of a second and the camera used the VR Disc that gave you an 8 by 10mm picture size. The camera also has a carry strap, flash off slide switch, frame count window, flash ready light, built in lens cover, power film advance, and it uses two AA batteries to power it all. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016. A disc film cartridge is a bit smaller than a 3.5 inch floppy disk and behaves much like the disk for a View-Master. Pressing the red-striped shutter button exposes an 8x11mm frame on the disk, which then rotates 24° for the next photo for a total of 15 frames per cartridge. Despite the convenience and foolproof loading procedure, disc film was a big commercial failure. Although new emulsion technology at the time meant that the tiny negatives contained a relatively surprising amount of detail, graininess, and poor image quality disappointed consumers and led to disc film’s ultimately forgettable demise.
Kodak Eastman: Champ Kodamatic camera  Kodak Eastman: Champ Kodamatic1982-1984 19995.001982-1984 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Colorburst 250 camera  Kodak Eastman: Colorburst 2501979  19993.501979-1982 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: DC210 Plus camera  Kodak Eastman: DC210 Plus1998  20027.001998 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (1MP)
Kodak Eastman: DC260 camera  Kodak Eastman: DC2601998  20106.501998 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (1.5MP)
Kodak Eastman: DC3200 camera  Kodak Eastman: DC32001998  200710.002001-2002 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (1MP)
Kodak Eastman: DC4800 camera  Kodak Eastman: DC48002000  201510.002000 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (3.1MP)
Kodak Eastman: Disc 3000 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 30001983-1984 20175.00The Kodak Disc 3000 is a camera for the briefly popular but ultimately unsuccessful disc film format. This particular model used a replaceable 9v battery, had a two speed shutter, and was sold from 1983 to 1984. The lens consisted of 4 glass elements with a focal length of 12.5mm at f/2.8, offering a 58° angle of view. The shutter speeds are 1/200 sec f/6 in daylight and 1/100 sec f/2.8 with flash. Other features are automatic film advance, sliding built in lens cover, automatic exposure, built in flash, and it came with a handy carry strap. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $5.00 in 2017. Kodak disc cameras, manufactured by the Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, USA, were introduced by in the USA in June 1982 with the Disc 4000, 6000 and 8000 models. At the same time an international model, the Kodak Disc 2000, was introduced but this was not available in the USA. All four models reached the UK market in September 1982. Consumers failed to take to them in the way Kodak had hoped. Images were often described as “acceptable” but never exceptional. With sales falling, Kodak ceased camera production in 1988, and film production in 1998. Over the years of production Kodak made the disc 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000, 3500, 3100, 4100, 6100, 3600, and Hawkeye disc 7000, Medalist I, II, and Tele. Also the Kodak Tele disc, Kodak Challenger, Tele Challenger, and Kodak 460, 470 – both premium models.
Kodak Eastman: Disc 3100 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 31001984-1987 20158.001984-1987 Poor condition worth $100 for parts in 2015 (does not respond)
Kodak Eastman: Disc 3100 (red) camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 3100 (red)1984-1987 20165.00This camera features a red faceplate, behind which lies a snapshot camera with electronic flash, all powered by a PP3 or as it is better known 9V battery. A variation of this model with copper-colored faceplate was sold by Kodak. The camera with the red front panel, was sold by J.C. Penney. Although the published marketing dates for the 3100 model are 1984-87, the camerosity date code in this example translates as 10-85 (CYIR). Some of the red front panel models Camerosity codes denote being made before 1984 so maybe J.C. Penney had this model before it was released for general sale. This camera uses VR Disc film and sold in the US for a list price of $48.00. It has a 12.5mm, f/2.8 lens and shutter speeds of 1/100 of a second plus 1/200 of a second. It also has a built in lens and viewfinder cover that seconds as the on/off switch. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Disc 3600 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 36001986-1990  20132.501986-1990 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Disc 3600 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 36001986-1990  20163.001986-1990 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Disc 4000 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 40001982-1984  201310.001982 Fine condition worth $8.00 in 2014 (1 of 8 from Fine to Poor condition)
Kodak Eastman: Disc 4100 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 41001984-1987 20175.00This is an updated version of the Disc 4000, the bottom tier of Kodak's disc series and was introduced in 1984 and discontinued in 1987. According to Kodak's website, there's no difference in the specifications between the old and new models. The only real difference I can see is that this has the folding protective cover, which the 4000 model lacks. So really it's more like the 6000 model, except that they retained the bare-metal finish instead of black plastic all the way around. The lens consisted of 4 glass elements with a focal length of 12.5mm at f/2.8, offering a 58° angle of view. The shutter speeds are 1/200 sec f/6 in daylight and 1/100 sec f/2.8 with flash. Other features are automatic film advance, sliding close-up lens, automatic exposure, built in flash, built in twin 3V Lithium battery set, permanent front cover attached, and it came with a handy carry strap. According to Kodak's site, this was badged as the Medalist I also. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017. Kodak disc cameras, manufactured by the Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, USA, were introduced by in the USA in June 1982 with the Disc 4000, 6000 and 8000 models. At the same time an international model, the Kodak Disc 2000, was introduced but this was not available in the USA. All four models reached the UK market in September 1982. Consumers failed to take to them in the way Kodak had hoped. Images were often described as “acceptable” but never exceptional. With sales falling, Kodak ceased camera production in 1988, and film production in 1998. Over the years of production Kodak made the disc 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000, 3500, 3100, 4100, 6100, 3600, and Hawkeye disc 7000, Medalist I, II, and Tele. Also the Kodak Tele disc, Kodak Challenger, Tele Challenger, and Kodak 460, 470 – both premium models.
Kodak Eastman: Disc 6000 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 60001982-1984  20052.001982-1984 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Disc 6000 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 60001982-1984  20155.001982-1984 good condition worth $6.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Disc 6000 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 60001982-1984  20161.001982-1984 Good condition worth $8.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Disc 6000 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 60001982-1984 20174.00The Kodak Disc 3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 were manufactured between 1982 and 1984 and retailed for between $57 and $143. They have the unique distinction of being the only cameras at the time that Kodak manufactured for use with the HR Discs instead of film. The Disc system was almost entirely automated, making the loading of film and picture-taking itself much simpler for the consumer. Even the battery was not user-serviceable; the 3v lithium battery had to be replaced by Kodak but did last for an extremely long time. The lens consisted of 4 glass elements with a focal length of 12.5mm at f/2.8, offering a 58° angle of view. The shutter speeds are 1/200 sec f/6 in daylight and 1/100 sec f/2.8 with flash. Other features are automatic film advance, sliding close-up lens, automatic exposure, built in flash, built in 3V Lithium battery, permanent front cover attached, and it came with a handy carry strap. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017. Kodak disc cameras, manufactured by the Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, USA, were introduced by in the USA in June 1982 with the Disc 4000, 6000 and 8000 models. At the same time an international model, the Kodak Disc 2000, was introduced but this was not available in the USA. All four models reached the UK market in September 1982. Consumers failed to take to them in the way Kodak had hoped. Images were often described as “acceptable” but never exceptional. With sales falling, Kodak ceased camera production in 1988, and film production in 1998. Over the years of production Kodak made the disc 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000, 3500, 3100, 4100, 6100, 3600, and Hawkeye disc 7000, Medalist I, II, and Tele. Also the Kodak Tele disc, Kodak Challenger, Tele Challenger, and Kodak 460, 470 – both premium models.
Kodak Eastman: Disc 6100 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 61001984-1987 20176.00The 6100 has a simple 12.5mm (roughly 40mm equivalent) f/2.8 lens with two preset focus zones of 0.5 to 1.2 meters (1.5’ to 5’) and 1.2 meters (5’) to infinity that can be selected by moving the slide switch underneath the lens. This moves a close-up lens in front of the main lens assembly. Exposure is automatically controlled and the built-in flash will fire when deemed necessary. The shutter speeds are 1/200 sec f/6 in daylight and 1/100 sec f/2.8 with flash. Other features are automatic film advance, sliding close-up lens, automatic exposure, built in flash, built in 3V Lithium battery, permanent front cover attached, and it came with a handy carry strap. The camera was produced from 1984 to 1987. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017. Kodak disc cameras, manufactured by the Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, USA, were introduced by in the USA in June 1982 with the Disc 4000, 6000 and 8000 models. At the same time an international model, the Kodak Disc 2000, was introduced but this was not available in the USA. All four models reached the UK market in September 1982. Consumers failed to take to them in the way Kodak had hoped. Images were often described as “acceptable” but never exceptional. With sales falling, Kodak ceased camera production in 1988, and film production in 1998. Over the years of production Kodak made the disc 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000, 3500, 3100, 4100, 6100, 3600, and Hawkeye disc 7000, Medalist I, II, and Tele. Also the Kodak Tele disc, Kodak Challenger, Tele Challenger, and Kodak 460, 470 – both premium models.
Kodak Eastman: Disc 8000 camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc 80001982-1984 20175.00The Disc 8000 was the top of the line. For the extra money you got a self-timer, single-shot and 3-shot burst modes; you got a little LCD clock-alarm built into the cover (which is not integrated with the camera at all, so it's just a tiny travel-alarm), and you got a spiffy gold finish. Modern Photography called it gaudy, but that was the 1980’s. The camera has two 3v lithium batteries, Part Number 227322. They were made by Matsushita Electric (aka Panasonic). You had to send the camera in to Kodak to get them changed. The camera also uses a CR2025 (or equivalent) coin battery for the clock located in the back of the cover. The Kodak Disc 8000 camera was initially priced at $143.00 and manufactured in USA from 1982 until 1984 when production stopped. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017 The acetate film backing was thicker than 35mm or 110 film therefore more rigid which meant they gave a better format for a flat surface so the film was not the problem with picture quality. The cameras themselves were all fitted with fairly decent aspherical lens so no problem there. The real problem was was the processing. The film was meant to be processed by a 6 element system not the usual 3 element used for processing 35mm film. Few labs wanted to go to the expense of acquiring the new processing equipment so they processed the discs using their existing equipment. Of course they turned out badly, had they used the "right stuff", things may have turned out much differently and the format would have lasted till the digital age.
Kodak Eastman: Disc Challenger camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc Challenger1986-1990 20176.00This camera was produced from 1985 to 1986 for the VR Disc format. The camera has a 12.5mm, f/4 and 22mm, f/5.6 lens and shutter speed of 1/300 of a second. Tele Challenger actually has two separate lenses. Extending the flash rotates the telephoto lens into place and also swaps in a new viewfinder. Other features are automatic film advance, automatic exposure, built in flash, built in twin 3V Lithium battery set, permanent front cover attached, and it came with a handy carry strap. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017. The acetate film backing was thicker than 35mm or 110 film therefore more rigid which meant they gave a better format for a flat surface so the film was not the problem with picture quality. The cameras themselves were all fitted with fairly decent aspherical lens so no problem there. The real problem was the processing. The film was meant to be processed by a 6 element system not the usual 3 element used for processing 35mm film. Few labs wanted to go to the expense of acquiring the new processing equipment so they processed the discs using their existing equipment. Of course they turned out badly, had they used the "right stuff", things may have turned out much differently and the format would have lasted till the digital age. Kodak disc cameras, manufactured by the Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, USA, were introduced by in the USA in June 1982 with the Disc 4000, 6000 and 8000 models. At the same time an international model, the Kodak Disc 2000, was introduced but this was not available in the USA. All four models reached the UK market in September 1982. Consumers failed to take to them in the way Kodak had hoped. Images were often described as “acceptable” but never exceptional. With sales falling, Kodak ceased camera production in 1988, and film production in 1998. Over the years of production Kodak made the disc 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000, 3500, 3100, 4100, 6100, 3600, and Hawkeye disc 7000, Medalist I, II, and Tele. Also the Kodak Tele disc, Kodak Challenger, Tele Challenger, and Kodak 460, 470 – both premium models.
Kodak Eastman: Disc Medalist II camera  Kodak Eastman: Disc Medalist II1986-1987 20177.00This camera was produced from 1986 to 1987 and used the VR disk film format. The lens consisted of 4 glass elements with a focal length of 12.5mm at f/2.8, offering a 58° angle of view. The shutter speeds are 1/200 sec f/6 in daylight and 1/100 sec f/2.8 with flash. Other features are automatic film advance, sliding close-up lens, automatic exposure, built in flash, built in twin 3V Lithium battery set, permanent front cover attached, and it came with a handy carry strap. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017. Kodak disc cameras, manufactured by the Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York, USA, were introduced by in the USA in June 1982 with the Disc 4000, 6000 and 8000 models. At the same time an international model, the Kodak Disc 2000, was introduced but this was not available in the USA. All four models reached the UK market in September 1982. Consumers failed to take to them in the way Kodak had hoped. Images were often described as “acceptable” but never exceptional. With sales falling, Kodak ceased camera production in 1988, and film production in 1998. Over the years of production Kodak made the disc 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000, 3500, 3100, 4100, 6100, 3600, and Hawkeye disc 7000, Medalist I, II, and Tele. Also the Kodak Tele disc, Kodak Challenger, Tele Challenger, and Kodak 460, 470 – both premium models.
Kodak Eastman: Duaflex II camera  Kodak Eastman: Duaflex II1950-1960  201410.001950-1954 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Duaflex III camera  Kodak Eastman: Duaflex III1954-1957  19986.501954-1957 Poor condition worth $8.00 with the flash unit in 2014 (missing film wind knob)
Kodak Eastman: Duaflex III camera  Kodak Eastman: Duaflex III1954-1957  201410.001954-1957 good condition worth $10.00 with the flash unit in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Duaflex III camera  Kodak Eastman: Duaflex III1954-1957  201520.001954-1957 Good condition worth $20.00 with the flash unit in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Duaflex IV camera  Kodak Eastman: Duaflex IV1955-1960  19948.001947-1960 good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Duaflex IV camera  Kodak Eastman: Duaflex IV1955-1960  201310.001947-1960 good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Duaflex IV camera  Kodak Eastman: Duaflex IV1955-1960  199010.001947-1960 good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Duex camera  Kodak Eastman: Duex1940-1942  20016.001940-1942 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: DX4530 camera  Kodak Eastman: DX45302003  20095.002003 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2014 (5MP)
Kodak Eastman: DX7440 camera  Kodak Eastman: DX74402004  201210.002004 Fine condition worth $45.00 in 2014 (4MP)
Kodak Eastman: DX7590 camera  Kodak Eastman: DX75902004  20155.002004 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015 with docking port (5.0 MP)
Kodak Eastman: DX7630 camera  Kodak Eastman: DX76302004  201211.002004 good condition worth $35.00 in 2014 (6.1MP)
Kodak Eastman: Easy Load 35 KE30 camera  Kodak Eastman: Easy Load 35 KE30c2000  20051.502000 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Easy Load 35 KE60 camera  Kodak Eastman: Easy Load 35 KE60c2000  20135.002000 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C195 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C1952010  201410.002010 Fine condition worth $60.00 in 2014 (14MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C300 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C3002005  20145.002005 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (3.2MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C310 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C3102005  20125.002005 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (4.0MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C433 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C4332006  201410.002006 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (4.0MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C743 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C7432006  201415.002006 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014 (7.1MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C813 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare C8132008  201510.002007 fine condition and worth $30.00 in 2015 (8.2MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare CX7220 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare CX72202004  20153.002004 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015 (2.0MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare CX7300 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare CX73002004  20153.002006 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2015 (3.2MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare CX7430 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare CX74302004  201010.002003 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2014 (4MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare CX7530 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare CX75302004  20145.002004 fine condition worth #30.00 in 2014 (5MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare M1093 IS camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare M1093 IS2008  20155.001998 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2015 (10.0MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare M532 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare M5322010  20145.002010 Fine condition worth $50.00 in 2014 (14MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare M550 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare M5502010  201610.00The 2010 Kodak EasyShare M550 Digital Camera (Blue) has a stylish slim design that is not only a camera but is also is a fashion accessory. Compact and easy to use, the camera features a 12 megapixel image sensor, and a large, bright 2.7" LCD screen. The 28mm 5x optical zoom lens allows you to take photos in tight spots and still capture your subject in the distance. Advanced face detection, blur reduction, and high ISO technologies keep all of your subjects looking their very best. Scene select modes such as Portrait, Landscape, and Fireworks simplify exposure for a variety of complex shooting situations. There is even a Panorama stitch mode that allows you to combine up to three shots into one large picture. The EasyShare M550 even captures VGA quality motion video with sound. Sharing your images is easy, press the share button and tag them to YouTube, Facebook, Flickr, and Kodak Gallery sites. When you connect your camera to your computer, your images are automatically uploaded to the site. You can also create slideshows right in your camera. Be creative using the pre-loaded sound themes and creative transitions. You will never miss a shot since the included Li-ion rechargeable battery gives your camera plenty of power. The maximum resolution for this camera is 4000 x 3000 and this is achieved with a ½.3 inch (6.17 x 4.55mm) size sensor. The focal length equivalent is 28mm to 140mm with a maximum shutter speed of 1/1400 of a second. The suggested retail price in January 5th 2010 was $145.99. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare V1253 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare V12532007  201615.00Whether you seize the moment with incredibly sharp 12 megapixel photos, or in motion with crisp videos, you can do it all with the KODAK EASYSHARE V1253 Zoom Digital Camera. Enjoying beautiful pictures with amazing quality is as simple as using the KODAK EASYSHARE V1253 Zoom Digital Camera. Besides the 12.1 megapixels of resolution, it features a professional quality 3x Schneider-Kreuznach Variogon zoom Lens and a 3.1" high-resolution display. The camera can also record video in HDTV format using the 720p standard, and MPEG-4 compression for impressive video quality while using a minimum of storage space. Furthermore it is loaded with in-camera picture enhancing features such as Kodak Perfect Touch technology, Digital Image Stabilization using anti-blur mode, and multiple color and scene modes including a panorama stitch feature. Plus, you can customize the camera with on-camera settings, including the Favorites feature. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $40.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare Z1285 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare Z12852008  201615.002008 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2016 (3.1MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare Z700 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare Z7002005  20108.002002 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (4MP)
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare Z740 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare Z7402005  20105.502005 Poor condition worth 1.00 for parts in 2014 (5MP) Fine value would be $25.00
Kodak Eastman: EasyShare Z885 camera  Kodak Eastman: EasyShare Z8852007  201510.002007 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (8.1MP)
Kodak Eastman: EK4 camera  Kodak Eastman: EK41976-1978  200410.001976-1978 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: EK6 camera  Kodak Eastman: EK61976-1978  20045.001976-1978 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015 (name plate missing sent back to Kodak for refund)
Kodak Eastman: Ektra 1 camera  Kodak Eastman: Ektra 11978  19972.001978 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Ektra 1 camera  Kodak Eastman: Ektra 11978  20102.001978-1981 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Ektra 200 camera  Kodak Eastman: Ektra 2001980-1987 20172.00The Kodak Ektra 200 is among many 110 film cameras made by Kodak. It used disposable flip-flash for indoor photography, was made in (West) Germany, and was produced from 1980 to 1987. A basic snapshot camera usually found with the metallic finish and black folding handle, it was also available in black and white. The cameras lens is a 22mm, f/11 Kodar and it has a 3 speed shutter. The picture size is 13 x 17 mm from the 110 film that is still available, but flip-flash is not. There were at least 13 Ektar cameras produced by Kodak and in Germany, many of these models are referred to as Ritsch-Ratsch because of the sound the film-wind mechanism makes. Kodak's range went from the most basic of snapshot cameras, which are very capable of excellent results, right through to range-finder cameras with wide-aperture lenses. So popular was the 110 format that more than 25 million cameras were produced within three years. Like many of these 110 Kodak cameras Kodak supplied a sheet of self-adhesive initials with these cameras so that the owner could personalize their camera. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Ektra 250 camera  Kodak Eastman: Ektra 2501980-1983  19993.001980-1983 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Ektralite 10 camera  Kodak Eastman: Ektralite 101978  19972.001978 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Ektralite 400 camera  Kodak Eastman: Ektralite 4001981 20164.00The Ektralite range was developed at the same time as that of Ektra series. It corresponds to the same cameras, but with a built-in flash. This 110 film camera was announced in France November 1980 and was manufactured in Germany from 1981 to 1987. The Ekralite 400 was the basic model of the range during the launching of the Ektralite series. Its lens is a Reomar 24 mm F/6.8, fix-focus from 4 feet (1.2m) to infinity. A cursor makes it possible to choose between the mode “sun” and the “lightning” flash and the turns the flash on/off. The use of the flash regulates the aperture to 6.8 and speed to the 1/60 of a second. In the other position, if the film is Kodacolor 400, speed is 1/250 of a second and the aperture F/9.5. With the film Kodacolor II, the speed is 1/125 of a second and aperture 9.5. The flash and flash ready light is powered by two AAA batteries with a compartment accessed from the back of the camera. The camera also has a right thumb film advance slide lever, frame count view window in the back, optical viewfinder, and the cover seconds as a vertical handle when opened. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Film Pack Hawk-Eye No.2 camera  Kodak Eastman: Film Pack Hawk-Eye No.21922-1925  20158.00Film Packs were introduced in 1903. Initially known as the Premo Film Pack, after 1922 they were renamed as the Kodak Film Pack, and were available in a range of sizes from 6x4.5cm to 13x18cm (5x7"). Originally designed as a replacement for glass plates, indeed adaptors were available for many glass plate cameras. Up until the mid-1920's Eastman Kodak manufactured many cameras with the Premo and Hawk-Eye brand names specifically for this format. An interesting cross-over between old and new technology, the Film Pack comprised 12 cut celluloid films, stored in an (initially cardboard, later metal) outer case that was simply placed in the back of the camera, packed in such a way that the simple expedient of pulling a paper tab loaded a fresh film into place for each exposure, the previously exposed film being at the same time moved to the back of the pack. Each of the paper tabs, which protrude through a slot in the cameras top and were torn off after being used, had a number on it which acted as a basic, though perfectly efficient exposure counter. The camera is all metal with two reflecting finders, meniscus lens, 1/50 of a second leaf shutter with bulb setting, and a handy leather handle with the name embossed on it. On the back of this camera are the words “MOEHRING’S LYNN, MASS.” In white letters. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Fisher-Price camera  Kodak Eastman: Fisher-Price1984  20020.001984 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts but I like it in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Fisher-Price camera  Kodak Eastman: Fisher-Price1984  20154.001984 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Folding Autographic Brownie No.2 camera  Kodak Eastman: Folding Autographic Brownie No.21915-1926  201510.00The camera was introduced in September of 1915 and discontinued in 1926. It used autographic No.A-120 or regular 120 roll film for a picture size of 2 1/4” X 3 1/4" and was manufactured in the US plus UK. The camera came with either an Achromatic or a Rapid Rectilinear lens from 1915 to 1923. The Achromatic lens and the Rapid Rectilinear less was coupled with the ball bearing shutter from 1915 to 1923. From 1924 to 1926 they used a Kodex shutter and in 1925 to 1926 you could have a Kodar f/7.9 lens with a Kodex shutter. A UK variation had an Anastigmat f/6.3 lens with a Kodex shutter in 1926. The numbers made are unknown but 540,000 were produced before 1921 at an original price of $10.13 and you could buy a carrying case for $1.25. The camera has black imitation leather covering, two position reflecting finder plus foot for portrait or landscape, sliding bed focusing with two lock positions (8’ plus 100’ from serial number 1,001 on), autographic port with metal writing pin, and a frame view port in the back of the camera. The camera had a style change to the Autographic attachment in 1916 after serial number 53,501 found on the back of the foot support locking lever. It also changed in 1917 from square ended cases to round from serial number 133,301 on. In 1919 the support foot shape changed from shallow S cure to shallow C curve from serial number 375,601 on. The serial number on this camera is 323,543 plus the camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $10.00 in 2015.
Kodak Eastman: Folding Autographic Brownie No.2A camera  Kodak Eastman: Folding Autographic Brownie No.2A1915-1926  20105.001915-1926 poor condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Folding Autographic Brownie No.2C camera  Kodak Eastman: Folding Autographic Brownie No.2C1916-1926  20127.501916-1927 the case is in poor condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Folding Brownie Pocket No.2A camera  Kodak Eastman: Folding Brownie Pocket No.2A1910-1915 201723.00The Kodak No. 2A Folding Pocket Brownie is an early folding camera introduced by Eastman Kodak Company in 1910 at a price of $7 (about $170 in today’s money). The No. 2A is designed for the now defunct 116 film format which is very similar to 616 but with wider spool flanges. While we may think it’s a bit strange for Kodak to name this brick-sized camera a “Pocket” Brownie, it was considerably more portable than many of its contemporaries. To unfold the camera, a hidden button located between the hand strap lugs on the top plate must be pressed to release the lens. Once the camera is unfolded, set the focus distance by adjusting the focus tab on the user’s right side of the lens rail and pull the lens out to align with the tab. The viewfinder is set for landscape orientation by default but can easily be rotated 90 degrees for portraits. The aperture of the Brownie’s simple meniscus lens has four settings that can be selected by sliding the tab underneath the lens: “1” is f/8.8, “2” is f/11, “3” is about f/14, and “4” is f/16. The Brownie Automatic shutter has only three settings which can be set by sliding a similar tab above the lens: “I” (about 1/25 seconds), Bulb, and Time. This info was gleaned from Vintage Camera lab. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $35.00 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Folding Pocket No.1A camera  Kodak Eastman: Folding Pocket No.1A1899-1915  200510.001926-1932 good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Folding Pocket No.3 Mod C4 camera  Kodak Eastman: Folding Pocket No.3 Mod C4c1907-1915  201515.00The No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak Camera was manufactured by the Eastman Kodak company from 1900 to 1915. This camera had the most model variations of any Kodak camera made. The early models A, B & C produced through 1903 had the front lens and shutter enclosed and covered in leather, later models had metal stationary or rising front. The No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak Camera Models included A, AB, AB-EX, ABX, B, B-2, B-3, B-4, C, C-2, C-3, C-4, C-5, D, E, E-2, E-3, E-4, F, G, and H. Constructed of aluminum and covered in seal grain leather. It took 12 images 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 inch size on No. 118 film. The cameras original list price was $17.50 in 1900 to $68.00 in 1914 with the model H. The C-4 pictured here has a patent dated November 6, 1906 on the inside of the back cover. The camera had to be introduced after that date sometime in 1907 or 1908. The F.P.K Automatic shutter has a manual release as well as one pneumatic release piston on the left side of the shutter lens assembly if looking at the front of the camera. The lens is a Bausch & Lomb Optical Company Rapid Rectilinear, with a 6 1/2 inch focal length, maximum aperture of US 4 and stops to US 128. The waist-level viewfinder can be rotated 90 degrees so it can be used to take portrait format photographs. The camera also has two tripod sockets allowing either vertical and horizontal time exposures or the use of glass plates. Although the No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak was marketed as a camera for family photography, it was also suitable for the more 'serious' amateur photographer. One important accessory is the plate back. It replaced the roll film back so photos could be taken on glass plates. Glass plates had some advantages over roll film. They were perfectly flat (resulting in sharper images), they could be developed separately, the negatives didn't curl when dry, they were cheaper, and the image could be composed plus focused on a ground glass. Using glass plates had some disadvantages also like they were heavy, could break, taking a photo was cumbersome, and you had to place the camera on a flat surface using one of the metal foot supports provided or you needed a tripod to utilize this option.
Kodak Eastman: Folding Rainbow Hawk-Eye No.2A Model B camera  Kodak Eastman: Folding Rainbow Hawk-Eye No.2A Model B1930-1933  N/A35.001930-1933 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Handle camera  Kodak Eastman: Handle1977-1979  201310.001976 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Flashfun camera  Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Flashfun1961-1967  20158.001961-1969 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Flashfun II camera  Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Flashfun II1965-1969 20173.00The Flashfun II was introduced by Kodak in 1965 and discontinued in 1969. It is exactly the same as the Hawkeye Flashfun but came in other colors. The camera uses 127 roll film and AG-1B flash bulbs. The flash unit is powered by two AA batteries that are stored behind the flash and accessed from the back by loosening the screw provided. The camera also has a flash bulb release lever on the side and a red frame count window in the back. The film advance knob is located on the bottom of the camera and is sheltered on all sides as is the open slide lever that resides with it. The fixed lens is plastic and is about 28mm and the large viewfinder the same. The shutter release has a long through but its placement for the right hand is good. The only other feature is the handy carry strap. This camera type came in a kit that had the camera, batteries, flash bulbs, instructions, warranty card, advertisments, and one roll of film. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Instamatic II camera  Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Instamatic II1969-1975  20132.001969-1975 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Instamatic R4 camera  Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Instamatic R41965-1971  20111.001965-1971 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Instamatic R4 camera  Kodak Eastman: Hawk-Eye Instamatic R41965-1971  20145.001965-1971 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 100 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 1001963-1966  19912.001963 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 104 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 1041965-1968  20001.501965-1967 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 104 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 1041965-1968  20162.501965-1967 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 124 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 1241968-1971  20053.501968-1971 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 124 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 1241968-1971  20005.001968-1971 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 124 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 1241968-1971  20152.001968-1971 good condition worth $3.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 134 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 1341968-1971 20162.00Made in the USA from 1968 to 1971, this Vintage Kodak is a simple point and shoot camera with a flash cube socket and wrist strap. It uses 126 film and Duracell px-825 batteries that ceased production and are no longer available. The camera is 4 1/8" x 2" x 2 3/8 and originally sold for $16.95. For that money you received the camera, a film pack, one flash cube, batteries, and the instruction booklet all in a box made for it. The camera is a point and shoot and one of the many Instamatic models that Kodak made to accommodate the 126 cartridge film.
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 134 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 1341968-1971 20170.00Made in the USA from 1968 to 1971, this Vintage Kodak is a simple point and shoot camera with a flash cube socket and wrist strap. It uses 126 film and Duracell px-825 batteries that ceased production and are no longer available but do have replacements today. The camera is 4 1/8" x 2" x 2 3/8 and originally sold for $25.50 in the kit. For that money you received the camera, a film pack, one flash cube, batteries, and the instruction booklet all in a box made for it. The camera has an f/11 43mm lens and a 1/50 of a second shutter. The camera is one of the many Instamatic models that Kodak made to accommodate the 126 cartridge film. The camera pictured above is listed in Good condition and worth $10.00 in 2017. This camera was given to me by a friend whose father owned it and had passed. Thank You.
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 220 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 2201965-1968  19992.001965-1969 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 304 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 3041965-1969  20005.001965-1969 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (1 of 2)
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 36 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 361973-1974  20164.00The Kodak Instamatic 36 was a simple instant-load, point-and-shoot camera using 126 Cartridge film, made in the UK by Kodak Ltd. It was introduced in 1973 - one of many Instamatic cameras, and withdrawn in 1974. It was identical to the Instamatic 32 and 33, apart from grey front covering on the 32 and the chrome lens ring on the 33. It has an f11 fixed focus 43mm lens with a matching optical viewfinder. The two shutter speeds are 1/40 of a second when set on flash or cloudy and 1/80 of a second when set on a sunny day. The 36 also has a two conductor hot shoe as do the 32 and 33. The instamatic 333 uses the same body but incorporates a flash cube mount, electric eye for exposure, and forgoes the selector on the lens ring. The camera also has a right thumb film advance wheel on the top, a film cartridge view window in the back cover, wide shutter button, and a handy carry strap. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 404 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 4041965-1969  20076.001965-1969 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 with extras
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 404 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 4041965-1969  20082.001965-1969 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 404 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 4041965-1969  20162.001965-1969 good condition worth $2.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 414 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 4141968-1971  19923.501968-1971 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 44 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 441969-1973  20001.001969-1973 good condition worth $6.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 50 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 501963-1965  20051.501963-1966 good condition worth $8.00 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 500 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 5001964-1966  20097.001965-1966 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2014 (1 of 3)
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 500 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 5001964-1966  201010.001965-1966 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 500 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 5001964-1966  200510.001965-1966 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 700 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 7001963-1966  20101.001963-1966 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 804 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 8041965-1970  19993.501963 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 814 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic 8141968-1970 20166.00This camera is similar in specification to the Instamatic 804 but the automatic exposure on this camera is provided by a CdS cell rather than the selenium cell of the 804. Although this makes the system more responsive in low-light situations, it is also dependent on batteries, whereas the selenium cell is not. A small button is fitted below the viewfinder, adjacent to the lens, which is used for testing the battery and the "Use Flash" lamp in the viewfinder doubles as a battery confirmation. Flash is provided by flashcube socket that turns with each shutter release. The camera has an Ektanar f/2.8 38mm lens that contains thorium oxide and is, in fact, radioactive (one of many Kodak lenses from the 40's, 50's, and 60's that share this attribute). The shutter has speeds 1/60 of a second, 1/125 of a second, 1/250 of a second, and B that are set with a dial on the front of the camera. The camera also has an optical viewfinder, rangefinder, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, strap attach points, frame view window on the back cover, and spring motor film advance that is wound by pulling on a long nylon strap that rewinds into the camera's bottom. The camera was introduced in 1968 and was produced till 1970. It used the 126 cassette film cartridge and the camera list price at the time was $139.50 in the US. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic S-10 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic S-101967-1970  20179.50The S-10 is a compact snapshot camera with a retractable housing for the Kodar f/9.5 35mm lens. Flash is provided by flashcubes and the film is advanced by the knob on the right-hand end of the body that also turns the flash cube to the next position. The camera has 1/40 of a second and 1/125 of a second shutter speeds and the lower of the two shutter speeds is only available when a flashcube is fitted, the fitting of a used cube is the recommended means of obtaining exposure in less than sunny conditions. The rather obvious shutter release also retracts when the lens housing is pushed home in the down position flush to the camera. The S-10 is one of the few Instamatics with an electronic shutter powered by two 1.55 volt EPX825 (S825PX, PX825, KA825, LR53, or BLR53) batteries. The battery cage will not release and it cannot be replace with the lens housing extended because of a contactor that contracts when the housing is depressed effectively turning of the camera. The shutter is somewhat difficult to release with no film and will not release with the back cover opened. The film activates the shutter via the spring post that enters a hole in the 126 film at each frame. The Instamatic S-10 was introduced in 1967 and discontinued in 1970. The camera uses the 126 cartridge film introduced by Kodak in 1963 to produce a 28 by 28mm picture size. The original manufacturers suggested list price in 1963 was $27.50. Some of the information here was gleaned from The Kodak Classics site. The camera pictured here is in condition and worth $ in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-151970-1976  20075.001970-1976 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-151970-1976  20125.001970-1976 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-151970-1976  200510.001970-1976 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-151970-1976  199210.001970-1976 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-151970-1976  20065.001970-1976 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-151970-1976  20075.001970-1976 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-151970-1976  20152.001970-1976 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15F camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15F1970-1976  19902.001976-1988 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15F camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-15F1970-1976  20155.001976-1988 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-35 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-351970-1976  20045.001970-1976 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-45 camera  Kodak Eastman: Instamatic X-451970-1974  20055.001970-1974 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Jiffy Kodak Six-16 camera  Kodak Eastman: Jiffy Kodak Six-161933-1937  201515.001933-1937 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2015 (Has instruction Manual and box)
Kodak Eastman: Jiffy Kodak Six-20 Series II camera  Kodak Eastman: Jiffy Kodak Six-20 Series II1937-1948  201515.001937-1948 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (comes with original case)
Kodak Eastman: Jiffy Kodak Six-20 Series II camera  Kodak Eastman: Jiffy Kodak Six-20 Series II1937-1948  201612.001937-1948 good condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Junior Six 16 camera  Kodak Eastman: Junior Six 161935-1937  201617.001935-1937 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Junior Six-16 Series III camera  Kodak Eastman: Junior Six-16 Series III1938-1939  201617.001938-1939 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Junior Six-16 Series ll camera  Kodak Eastman: Junior Six-16 Series ll1937-1940  201617.001937-1940 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Junior Six-20 camera  Kodak Eastman: Junior Six-201935-1937  201515.001935-1937 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Kodak 35 camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak 351938-1948  201515.001940-1948 poor condition worth $10.00 for parts in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Kodak 35 camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak 351938-1948  20152.001940-1948 Poor condition worth $5.00 for parts in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Kodak HD camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak HD2005  20142.002005 fine condition worth $2.00 in 2015 (turn-in camera)
Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 10 camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 101997  20145.001997 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 10 camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 101997  20122.001997 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2015 (Batteries left in)
Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 10 camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 101997  200510.001997 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 10 camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 101997  20153.001997 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 10 camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 101997  20162.00The Kodak KB 10 introduced in 1997, was made by Kodak's Mexican plant. It is a simple point-and-shoot camera. It has a 2-element aspherical 30mm f/8.0 fix-focus lens, an optical viewfinder and a built-in flash. It looks like a modern compact camera but is just a primitive viewfinder camera, with no focusing and a flash that could not be switched off. The focus range is 4 foot (1.2m) to infinity and uses two AA 1.5 volt alkaline batteries. The camera is set up to work best with ISO 400 speed film. Other cameras of the Kodak KB series were derived from the KB 10. The camera pictured above is in good condition with some corrosion in the battery compartment and worth $5.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 28 camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak KB 281999  20135.001999 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Kodak Kodamatic 960 camera  Kodak Eastman: Kodak Kodamatic 9601982  201515.001982 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: LS743 camera  Kodak Eastman: LS7432004  20155.002004 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2015 (4.0MP)
Kodak Eastman: LS753 camera  Kodak Eastman: LS7532004  20136.002004 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (5MP)
Kodak Eastman: Party Star camera  Kodak Eastman: Party Star1983-1984  20092.001983-1984 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 10 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 101972  20052.001973-1976 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 10 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 101972 20164.50This was the cheapest of the Kodak 110 cameras, and the Instamatic range. The Pocket Instamatics were frequently sold with a flash extender, since without this the Magicube would be too close to the lens, and produce a great deal of red-eye effect and glare. It is a basic snapshot camera with Magicube facility and two-speed shutter, the lower speed being engaged when a Magicube is fitted or just the extender. It does have a used bulb warning that shows up in the viewfinder when appropriate. Some examples come with a padded zipped case marked 'Kodak Smile Saver', with space for the camera, Magicube extender, and Magicube. The Camera has a 25mm, f/11 Meniscus lens, a push lever film advance, optical viewfinder, film observation window for frame count plus ASA, and a handy carry strap. The camera was introduced in 1973 and discontinued in 1976. The original suggested list price was $23.00 in 1973 and the 110 film produces a 13 x 17 mm picture size. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 20 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 201972-1976  20091.001972-1976 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 30 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 301972-1975  20075.001972-1976 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 300 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 3001972-1975  20175.50The Kodak Pocket Instamatic 300 was one of Kodak's pocket cameras for the type No. 110 16mm film cartridges, one of a variety of Instamatic 110 camera types. The camera has a slide selector switch for various apertures with weather symbols for dark clouds, cloudy, normal, sunny and bright mountain sun. The camera also has a fixed 26mm f5.6 Triplet lens and two shutter speeds. The lower of the two shutter speeds is only available when a flashcube is fitted or the extender is plugged in. The normal aperture setting is used when the Magicube is inserted in the socket provided on the top of the camera. The flash reaching from 1.2 meters to 5 meters, depending on selected aperture and Magicube rating. The 300 was manufacturer by Kodak AG (German branch of the Kodak Company) and launched in 1972 then discontinued in 1975. The dimensions are 114×55×27mm. Most of these cameras were sold in a kit with a Magicube 3 inch extender that drastically reduced the instances of red eye. The Magicube needed no batteries to fire and this was an advantage over other forms of flash bulbs of the time. Most kits came with the extender, one Magicube, roll of film, instruction booklet, carry strap, and the camera. Some 300’s came with a blue shutter button and others were black with no other distinction between them. The camera also has a bright-line viewfinder with parallax marks and a used-bulb warning for the Magicube socket. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017 plus made in May of 1973 according to the Camerosity Code dating system of YRSM.
Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 40 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 401972-1975  19952.001972-1975 good condition worth $7.50 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 40 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 401972-1975  20154.001972-1976 Good condition worth $20.00 with extras
Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 60 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket Instamatic 601972-1976  20052.501972-1976 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pocket No.1A Series II camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket No.1A Series II1923-1931  201525.001923-1931 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Pocket No.1A Series II camera  Kodak Eastman: Pocket No.1A Series II1923-1931  201525.001923-1931 poor to good condition worth $15.00 in 2015 (Leatherette needs regluing)
Kodak Eastman: Pony 135 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pony 1351950-1954  200010.001950-1954 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pony 135 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pony 1351950-1954  199615.001950-1954 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pony 828 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pony 8281949-1959  N/A15.001949-1959 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pony 828 camera  Kodak Eastman: Pony 8281949-1959  20155.001949-1959 Poor condition worth $2.00 for parts in 2015 (Shutter sticks)
Kodak Eastman: Pony II camera  Kodak Eastman: Pony II1957-1962  1994$20.001957-1962 X-Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Pony II camera  Kodak Eastman: Pony II1957-1962 20178.00Introduced in 1957 and discontinued production in 1962 this enigmatic camera, the Pony II utilizes Kodak's higher quality Anastar lens (4 elements in 3 groups, similar to a Tessar but with the rear element group reversed) in a rigid mount, but has only a single 1/30 of a second (M sync only) shutter speed. The 44mm f3.9 with EV (exposure values) of 9.5 to 15 lens lacks traditional f/stops, but instead is marked with EV’s (exposure values). The aperture diaphragm has only four blades. The top mounted film reminder dial of the Pony 135 models is replaced by a holder on the camera's back providing a place for Kodak film EV cards. The camera's redesigned top has a very different "late 1950s" look. The B-1 pocket flash holder uses two AA batteries, can use M5 or M25 lamps, and has a number of adjustments on the back for setting the correct lens opening. The Kodak Pony II originally sold for $26.75 USD without the flash attachment. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth with the flash $30.00 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Rainbow Hawk-Eye No.2 Mod C camera  Kodak Eastman: Rainbow Hawk-Eye No.2 Mod C1930-1933  20155.001926-1934 good condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Rainbow Hawk-Eye No.2 Mod C camera  Kodak Eastman: Rainbow Hawk-Eye No.2 Mod C1930-1933  20158.001926-1934 Good condition worth $18.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Rainbow Hawk-Eye No.2 Mod C camera  Kodak Eastman: Rainbow Hawk-Eye No.2 Mod C1930-1933  201610.001926-1934 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Retina Ia (015) camera  Kodak Eastman: Retina Ia (015)1951-1954  201532.001951-1954 Good condition worth $60.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: S 100 EF Kodak camera  Kodak Eastman: S 100 EF Kodak1988-1993  20164.00This camera was introduced in 1988 and discontinued in 1993. From the Kodak S-series point-and-shoot line, the S100 featured a (plastic?) 35mm f/4.5 lens and 3 aperture settings. The camera required 2 AA batteries to power the flash but was otherwise a manual camera. The aperture was set by way of either the "film speed" switch (100/200 or 400) or by the flash switch. The smallest aperture was used with the film speed switch set to "400" and the middle aperture setting was used when the switch was set to "100/200." The aperture was the most open (f/4.5) only when the flash switch was enabled. However, if the photographer removed the batteries, the camera could still be used with the flash switch enabled, thus giving 3 different aperture levels. The camera also has a built in lens cover that locks the shutter button when closed, a frame counter, optical viewfinder, right thumb film advance wheel, fold down rewind crank that pulls up to release the film, rewind film release button on the bottom of the camera body, flash read light, and a film view window in the back cover. The camera was made in Taiwan R.O.C. (Republic of China) and distributed by Eastman Kodak Company out of Rochester New York.
Kodak Eastman: S 300 MD Kodak camera  Kodak Eastman: S 300 MD Kodak1988-1993  19985.001989-1993 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: S 400 SL Kodak camera  Kodak Eastman: S 400 SL Kodak1989-1991  20062.501989-1991 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (1 of 2)
Kodak Eastman: S1100 XL-Kodak camera  Kodak Eastman: S1100 XL-Kodak1989-1993  20055.001989-1993 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Signet 40 camera  Kodak Eastman: Signet 401956-1959  200912.001956-1959 Good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Six-16 Brownie (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Six-16 Brownie (US)1933-1941  19985.001933-1941 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Six-16 Brownie Junior (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Six-16 Brownie Junior (US)1934-1942  19985.001934-1942 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Six-16 Brownie Junior (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Six-16 Brownie Junior (US)1934-1942  20154.001934-1942 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Six-16 Target Hawk-Eye camera  Kodak Eastman: Six-16 Target Hawk-Eye1932 201510.001932-1933 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie (US)1933-1941  19985.001933-1941 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie Camera Model E camera  Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie Camera Model E1953-1957  201613.001953-1957 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie Junior (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie Junior (US)1934-1942  201210.001934-1942 good condition worth $7.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie Junior (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie Junior (US)1934-1942  20045.001934-1942 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie Junior (US) camera  Kodak Eastman: Six-20 Brownie Junior (US)1934-1942  199310.001934-1942 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Star 1035z camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 1035z1993-1995  20082.001993-1995 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Star 1035z camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 1035z1993-1995  20165.001993-1995 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Star 110 camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 110c1993  20082.001993 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (1 of 2)
Kodak Eastman: Star 110 camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 110c1993 20173.50Made in China, a simple snapshot camera with a built-in electronic flash, the unusual feature being the centrally mounted film-wind wheel on the back of the camera. Rebadged versions were made for Disney as the Lion King Camera and the Mickey-Matic. The camera needs two AAA size alkaline batteries for the automatic flash unit and flash ready indicator. The flash refresh rate is 10 seconds with new batteries. Two versions of the Star 110 were produced at the same time and introduced in 1993. One more rounded and stylish with the other boxy. The camera uses the 110 cartridge but finding a photo finisher may be difficult at best. Both cameras have a 28mm f8 fixed focus lens, 1/125 of a second shutter speed, tripod mount on the bottom, flash on/off switch, flash ready LED, film observation window in the back cover that is also the frame counter, and a handy carry strap. The original manufacturers suggested list price in the US was $18.95. The camera picture at the top is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Star 235 camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 235c1992  20052.501992 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Star 235 camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 235c1992  20163.001992 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Star 435 camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 435c1990-1994  20053.001990-1994 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Star 435 camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 435c1990-1994  20163.001990-1994 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Star 535 camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 5351992-1995  20162.00This camera was introduced by Kodak in 1992 and discontinued in 1995 plus manufactured in Mexico. It has a built in Kodak sensalite flash, built in lens cover, optical viewfinder, frame counter on the top of the camera body, film view window in the back, automatic film advance, automatic rewind at the end of the roll, and a handy built in carry strap. Once the camera is turned on the flash unit charges and the Kodak sensalite system is engaged with no option to turn it off. The lens cover switch also turns the camera on and off plus locks the shutter button. The measurements are 5 3/16” x 3 1/8” x 2” and it weighs about 5 ounces without the two AA batteries that power the camera. The camera works best with ASA 200 35mm film and it shows you that when you open the film compartment. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Star 735 camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 735c1991-1994  20158.001991-1994 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Star 935 camera  Kodak Eastman: Star 935c1991-1993  20075.001991-1993 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Star Focus Free camera  Kodak Eastman: Star Focus Freec1995-1997  20155.001995-1997 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Stylelite Pocket camera  Kodak Eastman: Stylelite Pocket1979  20041.001979-1982 good condition worth $4.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Tele Disc (Medalist) camera  Kodak Eastman: Tele Disc (Medalist)1985-1990  20131.001985-1988 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Tele Disc (Medalist) camera  Kodak Eastman: Tele Disc (Medalist)1985-1990  20152.001985-1990 good condition worth $2.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Tele-Ektra 1 camera  Kodak Eastman: Tele-Ektra 11978-1981  20162.00Slightly deeper bodied than similar cameras in the range, the 'norm/tele' control on the top of the camera changes the magnification of the brightline viewfinder as it switches the lens from 22mm to 44mm. Flash is provided by Flipflash. The camera pictured above is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Kodak Eastman: Tele-Ektralite 20 camera  Kodak Eastman: Tele-Ektralite 201979-1981 20172.00The Kodak Tele-Ektralite 20 is a 110 cartridge film camera. It featured "normal" and "tele" mode, and a built-in flash. It was made in Canada, introduced in 1979 and discontinued in 1981. The camera has a 22mm and 44mm f/9.5 lens plus a 2 speed shutter. The lower of the two shutter speeds is only available when the flash is being used. The built in flash on this Canadian-made dual-lens camera normally folds flush with the end of the camera when off, only flipping out when needed. When the lens is changed from its 'norm' setting of 22mm to the 'tele' setting of 44mm, the Brightline viewfinder changes in magnification to match the lens. The manufacturer’s suggested retail price in 1979 was $58.00. The camera also has a view window in the back cover to view ASA plus frame count, and it is the cover release. By putting your finger in the window opening and sliding it in the down position the cover opens. The camera does not have a tripod mount but does have a flash ready light. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and worth $1.00 for parts in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Tele-Ektralite 600 camera  Kodak Eastman: Tele-Ektralite 6001979  20153.001980-1982 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Tele-Instamatic 608 camera  Kodak Eastman: Tele-Instamatic 6081975-1979 19972.001975 Good condition worth $12.00 in 2014 (1 of 2)
Kodak Eastman: Tele-Instamatic 608 camera  Kodak Eastman: Tele-Instamatic 6081975-1979 20178.00The Tele-Instamatic 608 has a 25mm (f11) and 43mm (f11) lenses. One of the first cameras to let you choose between a normal and a telephoto lens with a flick of the finger. This is a fixed focus, fixed exposure camera introduced in 1975 and discontinued in 1979. It has a depth-of-field from 5 feet to infinity (25mm) and 6 feet to infinity (43mm). It also has shutter speeds of 1/125 of a second (1/45 of a second for flash), flip-flash socket, and a spring-loaded lens cover/viewfinder cover (does not lock shutter). It does not have a tripod or cable shutter release socket. Overall size is 2 1/4 x 5 x 1 1/8". The camera originally came with stick-on monogram letters to personalize your new purchase. An extra you could purchase and pictured here is the Kodak “Model A” Ektron Electronic flash unit that fits in the flip-flash socket and uses two AA batteries. This camera pictured here is in Fine condition and with the flash unit worth $20.00 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: Tourist (Anastar) camera  Kodak Eastman: Tourist (Anastar)1948-1951  20165.001951-1958 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Kodak Eastman: Tourist II camera  Kodak Eastman: Tourist II1951-1958  199013.001951-1958 good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Tourist II camera  Kodak Eastman: Tourist II1951-1958  200410.001951-1958 Poor condition worth $3.00 in 2014 (missing the film pin assembly)
Kodak Eastman: Tourist II camera  Kodak Eastman: Tourist II1951-1958  201515.001951-1958 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Trimlite Instamatic 18 camera  Kodak Eastman: Trimlite Instamatic 181975-1979  20122.001975-1979 fine condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Trimlite Instamatic 38 camera  Kodak Eastman: Trimlite Instamatic 381975-1979  20158.001975-1979 Fine condition worth $20.00 with original box, three year warranty card, strap, and instruction booklet
Kodak Eastman: Trimprint 940 camera  Kodak Eastman: Trimprint 9401984-1986  201510.001984-1986 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: Vigilant Six-16 camera  Kodak Eastman: Vigilant Six-161939-1948  2015201939-1948 Good condition worth $40.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K10 camera  Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K101986-c1900s 20175.00Kodak's VR35-Series was a line of 35mm point-and-shoot cameras, introduced in 1986, marking Kodak's return to making 35mm cameras after a 17 year gap. The range continued until 1993. They had varying degrees of sophistication, ranging from the basic fixed focus models, with one aperture, no built-in flash and manual wind, to models with motor drive, programmed auto exposure and autofocus. Manufacturing sites included Japan, Hong Kong, Thailand and Taiwan. The Vr35 K10 uses a standard 9V battery for the flash and automatic functions. It also has a 35mm f3.5 Ektanar lens, DX-coded film speed with no manual setting, electronic shutter, auto focus, frame counter, lens cover, fill flash switch, film view window in back cover, shutter speeds of 1/8 of a second to 1/500 of a second, 24 x 36mm picture size, rewind fold down crank handle, and a right thumb film advance wheel. The flash is 4 inches above the lens to prevent red eye and flash glare. The camera was made in Japan, introduced in 1986, and discontinued in 1988. The original list price for the US was $130.00 in 1986. The camera picture here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K12 camera  Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K121986-1989  201510.001986-1989 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K300 camera  Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K300c1987-1990  20035.001987-1990 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K300 camera  Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K300c1987-1990  20153.001987-1990 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K80 camera  Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K80c1987-1993  20116.001987-1993 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K80 DX camera  Kodak Eastman: VR 35 K80 DXc1986-1993  20145.001986-1993 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kodak Eastman: Winner Camera camera  Kodak Eastman: Winner Camera1979  20164.00The Kodak Winner was introduced in 1979 for $11.95 and uses 110 film. It is a basic fixed-focus pocket camera, and has a Flipflash socket. A version in red was marked "Kodak Official Sponsor of the 1988 Olympic Games". 110 film is still available so a working example can still be used by those with a case of nostalgia. It is extremely similar to Kodak Gimini, Kodak Trimlite Instamatic 18, Kodak Mickey-Matic (first model), Kodak Kids Camera, and Kodak Galactic. All these cameras use a Flipflash that had four or five flash bulbs on each side facing front. Once one side is used you flip the assembly over for the other side. The flipflash was produced by many of the camera and bulb companies (Agfa, Phillips, Polaroid, Sylvania, and GE to name a few). Another camera (other than using flashcubes) that resembles the line is the Kodak Hawkeye Pocket Instamatic. The Winner camera using 110 film produces a 13 x 17mm picture with a 25mm f11 meniscus lens. The shutter speeds are 1/90 of a second and 1/40 of a second with Flipflash installed in the provided socket. The optimum Flash Distance is 5 to 16 feet with various Flipflash units available. The camera also has a right hand side film advance lever, optical viewfinder, film observation window in the back cover for frame counting, and a handy carry strap. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Konica Minolta: DiMAGE Z6 camera  Konica Minolta: DiMAGE Z62005  201410.002005 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014 (6.0MP)
Konishiroku (Konica): KD-400 Zoom camera  Konishiroku (Konica): KD-400 Zoom2002  2002410.002002 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014 (4.0MP)
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica Auto S2 camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica Auto S21965  199510.001965-1966 good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica Autoreflex T camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica Autoreflex T1968-1970 20165.00The Autoreflex T was the first focal plane shutter 35mm SLRs with auto-exposure and TTL metering combined in one body. In Japan it was sold as FTA, in Germany as Revue Autoreflex TTL. It was introduced in 1968 and discontinued in 1970. The AutoReflex line started in 1965 and continued till 1982 with the last of them being the Autoreflex TC. The Autoreflex T is fully mechanical with shutter-priority auto exposure. The batteries (two PX 675 type mercury cells) were only needed for the CdS light meter. The shutter speed range is from 1 second to 1/1000 of a second and B. The camera has a right thumb film advance lever, locking shutter button, ASA plus shutter speed selector knob combination, time delay lever, two flash sockets M plus X, check batteries button, film rewind fold down crank, rewind release button, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, frame counter, and more. There is one rare and special version of this model, known as the Autoreflex W. This is a camera fitted with a special timing back, for use at sporting events. It imprints the time of the exposure on each frame of film. The back is similar in function to the one offered in 1963 on the Konica FS-W, an F/FS mount camera. The camera pictured above has a stuck rewind release button and is listed in Poor condition. In this condition it is worth $5.00 for parts in 2016.
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica Autoreflex TC camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica Autoreflex TC1976-1982  19948.001976-1982 good condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica C35 camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica C351968  201615.00The Konica C35 of 1968 is a 35mm camera and first of a series of four cameras from Konishiroku. The Konica C35 was the first of a number of compact cameras that swept the marketplace in the early seventies. It brought together a number of desirable design strands into one camera, not simply light weight and compact size, but a CdS meter in the lens mount (eliminating worries about filter correction factors), a rangefinder and most importantly of all, the simple operation of "auto only" exposure. The camera was available in black or silver with a 38mm f2.8 four-element Hexanon lens with 46mm filter thread. It also has a coupled rangefinder, self-timer, 3.3ft closest focus, Copal B mat programmed shutter, shutter speeds 1/30 to 1/650 of a second, lever wind, double-exposure prevention, resetting frame counter, bright line finder, and a handy carry strap. The price in Britain £42.15 (£42.75, in April 1970). In Japan, the C35 was nicknamed and advertised by Konishiroku as the Konica C35 "Journey", an ideal travel camera thanks to its compact size. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica C35 EF camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica C35 EF1975  20074.501975 good condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica C35 EFP camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica C35 EFP1977  19905.001978 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica C35 EFP camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica C35 EFP1977  201415.001978 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica Disc 15 camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica Disc 151983  19995.001983 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2014
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica FP 1 (Program) camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica FP 1 (Program)c1981  2015251981-1983 fine condition worth $50.00 2015
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica FS 1 camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica FS 1c1979-1983  201515.001979-1983 Poor condition worth $5.00 for parts and the lens is in fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015 (no shutter response but the motor runs and runs)
Konishiroku (Konica): Konica FS 1 camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Konica FS 1c1979-1983  201520.001979-1983 fine condition worth $30.00 and the lens is in fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Konishiroku (Konica): Z-up 60e (Fantasio 60z) camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Z-up 60e (Fantasio 60z)2002  200522.001999 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Konishiroku (Konica): Z-up 70 Super camera  Konishiroku (Konica): Z-up 70 Super1998  200120.001999 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri 35 camera  Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri 351954  201547.001954 Fine condition worth $75.00 in 2015
Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri 35 E camera  Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri 35 E1977  19952.001977 Poor condition worth $5.00 for parts in 2014
Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri 7 camera  Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri 71961  201520.001961 fine condition worth $40.00 in 2015 (This camera comes with the original box, the sleeve over the box, the Petri plastic bag for the camera, the bill of sale from a military base in Hawaii by Captain Joe A. Bandy, letter from the sister that received it as a present in 1962, the instruction manual, the original Desiccant bag from Petri, and the leather camera case.)
Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri 7 S camera  Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri 7 S1962  201615.001963 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2016
Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri FTX camera  Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri FTX1974  201616.001974 good condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri Penta V6 II camera  Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri Penta V6 II1970  201520.001965 fine condition worth $40.00 in 2015
Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri Prest camera  Kuribayashi (Petri): Petri Prest1961-1964  19955.001961-1964 poor condition worth 5.00 for parts in 2014 (dust ring missing on the lens)
KW (KameraWerkstatten): Praktica LTL3 camera  KW (KameraWerkstatten): Praktica LTL31975-1978 201525.00KameraWerkstatten Produced the camera under Kombinat VEB Pentacon in Dresden and the responsible constructor was Rolf Noack. The production period went from November 1975 to March 1978 and the number that was produced was 349,919. The shutter is mechanically controlled with a vertical-moving metal-blade focal plane for shutter exposure time. The possible shutter settings are B, 1/1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, and 1/1000 of a second. The view finder is a fixed eye-level view finder (Pentaprism) with a Fresnel lens and it has a micro prism range finder for a focusing screen, built-in shutter speed meter mirror with instant-return mirror. The cameras lens mount is an M42x1. The camera also has a mechanical 10 second self-timer, TTL-metering system, X-synchronization (1/125) flash system, accessory shoe at the top of the pentaprism, and uses a Varta V 625 battery. This is the last of the LTL series, and while it lacks some of the refined feel of the MTL3 it predates, it’s a great user and said to be an improvement of the previous LTL. The shutter release is on the front of the camera rather than the top and there is a reminder tab in the viewfinder that pops up to indicate that the shutter needs to be cocked! The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $25.00 in 2015.
KW (KameraWerkstatten): Praktiflex FX camera  KW (KameraWerkstatten): Praktiflex FX1953-1954  201515.00The Praktiflex FX was introduced in 1953 with flash contacts for bulbs (F) and electronic flash (X). The main change was just the name of the camera. The Praktiflex FX was a 35mm SLR camera with a waist-level finder, M42 lens mount, non-instant-return mirror, a removable back and a cloth focal plane shutter. The Praktica FX was The Praktiflex FX's finder is a reflex waist-level finder that shows a horizontally reversed image. As the mirror doesn't return automatically, film must be wound first in order to place the mirror in the viewing position. The focusing screen is a flat ground glass screen on one side and a condenser screen on the other side, providing a very bright image. There is a folding loupe that magnifies the whole screen to aid critical focusing. Despite not having micro prisms nor split image rangefinder, focusing is very easy and effective using just the magnifier. The screen produces remarkable images and watching the screen is more pleasant than the real world, the colors seem more vivid. The finder cover can be used as well as a frame finder or sports finder, but it doesn't allow focusing. Carl Zeiss Jena manufactured an accessory pentaprism finder that allowed eye-level viewing and focusing. Unfortunately, the pentaprism finder produces a smaller and dimmer image and the magnifier can't be used, so it's harder to focus, but as an accessory it is a valuable collectable. The original list price for the Praktifles FX was $139.50 with any of a number of lenses. The camera producer was KW (VEB Kamera-Werke Niedersedlitz) in Niedersedlitz, Dresden, and part of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). The shutter speeds are 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 500, and B. The speeds are selected by pulling up the outer ring on the shutter speed selector and moving the small black dot to the speed desired. The camera pictured above is in fine condition and worth $25.00 in 2015.
Largan: Chameleon XP camera  Largan: Chameleon XPc2000  20122.002000 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (0.3MP)
Leitz: Leica C1 camera  Leitz: Leica C12000  201025.001999 fine condition worth $75.00 in 2014
Leitz: Leica IIc camera  Leitz: Leica IIc1948-1951  2016180.001948-1951 Good condition worth $380.00 in 2016
Leitz: Leica IIIc camera  Leitz: Leica IIIc1940-1951  2016180.001940-1951 Good condition worth $250.00 and $100.00 for the Selsey Flash Synchronizing Base in 2016
Leitz: Leicaflex camera  Leitz: Leicaflex1964-1968  201680.001964-1968 fine condition worth $320.00 in 2016
Lifetime: Synchro Flash 120 camera  Lifetime: Synchro Flash 120c1955 201712.00The Synchro Flash 120 uses 120 film for a 6x6cm exposures and it is a box-type camera with an all metal body produced by Lifetime Camera Company in 1955. It has a 110mm f5.6 Zellar lens with two shutter speeds of 1/50 of a second and TIME. The camera also has an optical viewfinder, flash contacts behind the shutter selector, round small red window in the back of the camera for viewing the frame number on the backing of the film, and a handy carry strap connected to the viewfinder. It is extremely difficult to change the film in this camera. You have to remove the front of the camera or the whole lens shutter assembly from the body while pulling up the film advance knob. The Lifetime Camera Company was out of Chicago Illinois and the identical camera was also released under the United States Camera Company name as the Vagabond 120. The Pho-Tak Corporation used the body and lens housing to produce the Traveler 120 with no flash and the Scout 120 with female flash sockets on the side of the lens housing. The Traveler 120 Synchro Flash was also produced with both the posts on top and female flash sockets on the side of the lens housing. The Traveler without flash capability was affectionately or mistakenly known as the “Time Traveler 120” because of the labeling for the pull tab (poorly placed) for timed shutter speed. The Pho-tak Corporation was active from approximately 1948 to 1960 and was connected with United States Camera Company plus the Lifetime Camera Company both based in Chicago, Illinois also. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Linhof: Technika III camera  Linhof: Technika III1946-1958  2015125.001946-1958 good condition worth $300.00 in 2015
Logitech: ClickSmart 310 camera  Logitech: ClickSmart 3102002  20085.001998 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (0.3MP)
Logitech: ClickSmart 310 camera  Logitech: ClickSmart 3102002  20153.002001 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015 (352x288p)
Logitech: Fotoman Pixtura camera  Logitech: Fotoman Pixtura1995  201510.00KODAK DC-40 manufacturer’s suggested retail price was $299.00 and was the exact camera as the Logitech Fotoman Pixtura. Both were introduced in 1995 with an ISO equivalent of 84. They have 4MB’s of internal memory and shutter speeds of 1/30 to 1/175 second. In 1995 the manufacturer’s suggested retail price for the Logitech version was $995.00 nearly three times the Kodak. The camera was among the first consumer digital cameras sold. Its features included a 756x504 resolution (
Logitech: Fotoman Plus camera  Logitech: Fotoman Plus1992  201528.00This was the first truly digital camera to be sold on the market. It has a resolution of 320 x 240 and later models of the same camera had 376 x 284 resolution. It produces black and white photos with 256 gray levels and has 1Mb of internal RAM. The lens is a fixed focus f4.5 and the suggested retail in 1990 was $980.00 or £499. The FotoMan digitizes its monochrome images inside the camera. These images are ready to be imported direct from the camera into a personal computer running Microsoft Windows 3.0 or 3.1. The only additional hardware needed is a special cable, supplied with the camera, to connect FotoMan to the serial port of the computer. FotoMan is an important landmark in still camera design because it removes the hitherto important area of mechanics almost entirely. This makes it the first totally digital camera. Unfortunately the resolution of the camera is low and unlikely to help you produce any images of useable professional quality. The camera's monochrome image sensor has only 106,784 pixels (individual basic picture elements) on a CCD chip in an array of 284 by 376 pixels. The picture aspect ratio (height compared to width) is thus 1.32:1, which is virtually identical to that of television with each picture about 100k. Images were imported into the computer using FotoMan software, usually in conjunction with the FotoTouch software which is used to edit and print them and both came with the camera. After establishing connection with the camera, the FotoMan software displays a screen full of small images, reassuringly bounded by sprocket holes reminiscent of 35mm film! This same screen also tells you how much charge there is in the camera battery, using a very clear indicator with a line around an icon of a battery that had a percentage figure, too. Once you have imported your images you have the option to delete them from this same window. One drawback is the need to use the software to turn the flash on and off. The camera only has a shutter button with no on/off switch or flash control. Sensitivity is about ISO200, reduced to ISO25 with the neutral density filter, supplied to prevent overexposure which results in CCD overload in very bright light. The electronic shutter is stated to have a speed range of 40 milliseconds with flash (1/25 second), 1 to 32 milliseconds (1/1000 to 1/30 second) without flash. A built-in flash illuminates subjects within a range of 1.2 to 3 meters. The camera weighs 284 grams (10 ounces) and has an unusual shape. Worth $30.00 in 2015
Macy: Flash 120 camera  Macy: Flash 120c1930s  201618.001949 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Mamiya: Mamiya 528 AL camera  Mamiya: Mamiya 528 AL1975  199115.001975 good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Mamiya: Mamiya DSX 1000 B camera  Mamiya: Mamiya DSX 1000 B1975  201410.001974-1976 good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Mamiya: Mamiya MSX 1000 camera  Mamiya: Mamiya MSX 10001975  201412.001974 good condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Mamiya: Mamiya NC 1000 S camera  Mamiya: Mamiya NC 1000 S1978  201025.001978 fine condition worth $110.00 in 2014
Mamiya: Mamiya Sekor 1000 DTL camera  Mamiya: Mamiya Sekor 1000 DTL1968  199415.001968 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Mamiya: Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL camera  Mamiya: Mamiya Sekor 500 DTL1969  199410.001966 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Mamiya: Mamiya Sekor 528 TL camera  Mamiya: Mamiya Sekor 528 TL1967  201415.001975 fine condition worth $50.00 in 2014
Mamiya: Mamiya ZE camera  Mamiya: Mamiya ZE1980  201520.001980 fine condition worth $40.00 in 2015
Mansfield: Skylark V camera  Mansfield: Skylark Vc1962  201518.001957 Poor condition worth $10.00 for parts in 2015
Marvel (Comics): Lizzie McGuire camera  Marvel (Comics): Lizzie McGuire2003  20055.002003 New condition worth 8.00 in 2014
Marvel (Comics): The Incredible Hulk camera  Marvel (Comics): The Incredible Hulk2003  20055.002003 New condition worth 8.00 in 2014
Marvel (Comics): X-Men camera  Marvel (Comics): X-Men2003  20055.002003 New condition worth 8.00 in 2014
Mattel: Barbie 110 camera  Mattel: Barbie 1101995  20162.00The 1995 Barbie 110 camera originally came with a roll of 12 exposure 110 film and a small photo album. It was advertised as the “3 Piece Photo Fun Set” and came with a one year warranty. The camera was made in China for Mattel and the Barbie ISO 200 film was made in Italy. This is a focus free camera and needs no batteries due to the lack of a flash unit or any way to attach one. This is a camera you take outside for beat results. The camera also has a left thumb wheel film advance, film frame window in the load cover, big green shutter button, about a 50mm lens, view finder, and a carry strap with a hart shaped plastic trinket on the end with Barbie embossed on it. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Mattel: Barbie 110 camera  Mattel: Barbie 1101995  20174.50The 1995 Barbie 110 camera originally came with a roll of 12 exposure 110 film and a small photo album. It was advertised as the “3 Piece Photo Fun Set” and came with a one year warranty. The camera was made in China for Mattel and the Barbie ISO 200 film was made in Italy. This is a focus free camera and needs no batteries due to the lack of a flash unit or any way to attach one. This is a camera you take outside for beat results. The camera also has a left thumb wheel film advance, film frame window in the load cover, big green shutter button, about a 50mm lens, view finder, and a carry strap with a hart shaped plastic trinket on the end with Barbie embossed on it. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Mattel: Barbie Bubble Camera camera  Mattel: Barbie Bubble Camera2001  201710.00This is a working 110 film cartridge camera made in China for Kalimar and distributed by Mattel Toy Company in 2001. It is call the Bubble Cam due to the rubber like see through outer covering. The original package had a tiny non-working camera for Barbie, instructions, the camera, and a plastic picture frame of the same color and design with Barbie’s picture in it. The packaging was made with a hole in the plastic so you could touch it and the words “Squishy Jelly Camera: SQUEEZE It!” pointed it out. The cameras have a fixed-focus lens that make it very simple to use. The Jelly Cam’s were produced in purple, pink, blue, green, peach, plus silver and the Barbie labeled camera is found in all these colors but silver. Another camera without a flash was sold by Mattel as the Barbie Bear camera and a 35mm version with a flash unit was called the Cool’n Squeezy Jelly Camera. The camera pictured here is in New condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Mattel: Barbie Glitter Star camera  Mattel: Barbie Glitter Star1995 20179.00This camera was Made in China for the Kalimar Company and distributed by Mattel Toy Company in 1995. It is a working 110 cartridge film camera that has Barbie’s picture and name on it twice. The camera also has nine heart symbols including the lens opening, a frame on the front for Barbie’s picture, and the shutter release button is shaped like a heart. New, this camera comes in a heart shaped package along with a 1 inch long non-working duplicate for Barbie, a carry strap, and instructions. It has a tunnel type view finder with clear plastic at both ends and with no flash capability is for daytime outdoors. It also has a left thumb film advance wheel on the back low under the film door, a view window on the back for frame count, and the UPC calls it the 40022 Glitter Camera. A choking hazard warning is printed on the front of the package for small parts and says “Not for children under 3 years”. The camera pictured here is in New condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Mattel: Barbie Jelly Cam camera  Mattel: Barbie Jelly Camc2007  20178.00This is a working 35mm camera with a built in flash made in China for Kalimar and distributed by Mattel Toy Company in 2007. It is call the Jelly Cam due to the rubber like see through outer covering. The original package had a roll of ISO 200 12 exposure 35mm film, one AAA battery, instructions, the camera, picture album, and a plastic picture frame of the same color and design. The packaging was made with a hole in the plastic so you could touch it and the words “Feel How Squishy!” pointed it out. The camera will work without the battery that only supports the flash and the cameras have a fixed-focus lens that make it very simple to use. The Jelly Cam’s were produced in purple, pink, blue, green, peach, plus silver and the Barbie labeled camera is found in all these colors but silver. The dimensions are 12.3(W) x 8.9 (H) x 4.42 (D) cm. The camera without a flash was sold by Mattel as the Barbie Bear camera and a 110 version without a flash unit was called the Cool’n Squeezy Bubble Camera.
Mattel: Hot Wheels camera  Mattel: Hot Wheels2005  20095.002005 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Memorex: Spongebob camera  Memorex: Spongebob2004  20125.002004 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (1.3MP)
Mergott: Jem Junior 120 camera  Mergott: Jem Junior 120c1940s  201610.001940 good condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Minolta: Dynax 500 si (black) camera  Minolta: Dynax 500 si (black)1993  201615.001994 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Minolta: Freedom 100 camera  Minolta: Freedom 1001987  20085.001987 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom 101 camera  Minolta: Freedom 1011987  20055.001987 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom 200 camera  Minolta: Freedom 2001987  20161.00Freedom 200 in America (called Minolta AF-E II in Japan) is an autofocus compact camera and a simplified successor model to the original AF-E. Introduced in 1987 this camera has motor drive, built-in flash and runs on either a photo lithium battery or common AAA batteries. It uses DX-coded films, but only at ISO 100 or ISO 400. It served as the basis for both the fix-focus FS-E II and the all-weather AF-SP. The camera has a 35mm f/4.5 (4 elements/4 groups) lens, Infrared autofocus from 0.95 m to infinity, built-in flash that is automatically activated with a ready-light in the viewfinder, Shutter locked while recharging, a flash range (at ISO 100) of 0.95 to 3.3 meter, EV metering from 9.6 to 16.2 with ISO 100 film, crippled DX decoding with either ISO 100 or ISO 400, Non-DX films are exposed as ISO 100, automatic film loading, automatic film advance, and automatic film rewind. The camera is powered by either one 6V DL223A/BR-P2N lithium battery or four 1.5V AAA alkaline batteries. The dimensions are 132 x 69.5 x 48 mm and the weight is 250 g without batteries. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition due to the battery compartment but looks fine on the outside. For this reason this camera is worth $2.00 for parts in 2016.
Minolta: Freedom 202 camera  Minolta: Freedom 2021989  20150.001989 Poor condition worth $2.00 for parts in 2015 (no response)
Minolta: Freedom 50N camera  Minolta: Freedom 50N1997  20033.001997 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Action Zoom camera  Minolta: Freedom Action Zoom1992  201210.001992 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Action Zoom 90 camera  Minolta: Freedom Action Zoom 901999  200510.001999 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Action Zoom 90 camera  Minolta: Freedom Action Zoom 901999  201210.001999 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Autodate S II camera  Minolta: Freedom Autodate S II1998  20055.001998 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Dual C camera  Minolta: Freedom Dual C1987  20055.001987 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Escort QD camera  Minolta: Freedom Escort QD1991  200710.001991 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Family Zoom II camera  Minolta: Freedom Family Zoom II1998  20035.001998 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom III camera  Minolta: Freedom III1987  199510.001987 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Zoom 125 camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom 1252000  20145.002000 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Zoom 150 camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom 1502004  201110.002004 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Zoom 150 camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom 1502004  20162.002004 good condition worth $5.00 in 2016
Minolta: Freedom Zoom 70c camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom 70c1995  201010.001995 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Zoom 90 camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom 901989  19955.001989 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Zoom 90 camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom 901989  20153.001989 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Zoom 90c camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom 90c1991  20140.001991 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Zoom Supreme EX camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom Supreme EX1997  201010.001997 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Zoom Supreme EX camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom Supreme EX1997  201115.001997 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Freedom Zoom Supreme EX camera  Minolta: Freedom Zoom Supreme EX1997  20155.001999 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Minolta: Hi-matic camera  Minolta: Hi-matic1962  20157.501962 Poor condition worth $10.00 for parts in 2015 (stuck shutter)
Minolta: Hi-matic 7 S camera  Minolta: Hi-matic 7 S1966  200710.001962 Good condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Minolta: Hi-matic 9 camera  Minolta: Hi-matic 91966  199415.001966-1969 Fine condition worth $65.00 in 2014
Minolta: Hi-matic F camera  Minolta: Hi-matic F1972  201410.001972 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Hi-matic F camera  Minolta: Hi-matic F1972  200615.001972 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Hi-matic F camera  Minolta: Hi-matic F1972  201515.001972 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2015
Minolta: Hi-matic G camera  Minolta: Hi-matic G1974  20166.00The Minolta Hi-Matic G was launched in 1974 and is a 35mm Point & Shoot compact viewfinder camera. Like the other Hi-Matic’s it had automatic exposure. And like other 1970s Hi-Matic’s it had the CdS window inside the filter ring plus a two contactor hot shoe for the flash. With this camera Minolta overcame the "Electro Control" system which needed two batteries. Its CdS controlled exposure program set speed/aperture combinations from 1/30 second f2.8 to 1/650 second f14. The focusing ring had four distance symbols. F-Stop and shutter speed were shown in the viewfinder. The camera can use film up to 400 ASA and has a 38mm 2.8mm 4 element lens plus leaf shutter. The dimensions are 116×71×53 mm and it weighs 375 grams. The camera also has a right thumb film advance leaver, fold down rewind crank handle that releases the back cover when pulled up, electronic shutter release port, frame counter, and an optical viewfinder. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition with a bad shutter. For this reason it is worth $3.00 for parts in 2016.
Minolta: Maxxum 3 camera  Minolta: Maxxum 32003  201415.001997 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum 3 camera  Minolta: Maxxum 32003  201610.001997 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum 300si camera  Minolta: Maxxum 300si1995  1998310.001994 fine condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum 4 camera  Minolta: Maxxum 42002  201615.002002 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Minolta: Maxxum 400si camera  Minolta: Maxxum 400si1993  201610.001994 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Minolta: Maxxum 400si camera  Minolta: Maxxum 400si1993  201610.001994 Poor condition worth $2.00 for parts in 2016
Minolta: Maxxum 450si camera  Minolta: Maxxum 450si1993  201720.00Capture memories in a lively frame with the Minolta Maxxum 450si camera. The CCD sensor of this Minolta film camera delivers precise and sharp image quality. Grab the minutest detail of your subjects with the 90% field of view from the eye-level fixed pentaprism viewfinder of this Minolta SLR camera. Ensure your personal presence in those special moments using the self-timer feature of this Minolta film camera. Grab your subjects at a distance in a brighter frame using the 28mm field of view flash coverage from this Minolta SLR camera. This is a 1994 35mm SLR with built-in flash, auto focus, and auto exposure. It also has mid-roll changeover, Minolta A-type bayonet lens mount, Minolta's through-the-lens (TTL) phase detection system with one CCD sensor, Focus lock available, manual focus selectable, TTL-type; 8-segment honeycomb-pattern silicon photocell (SPC) metering, and electronic timer with approximately 10-sec delay (indication by blinking LED). The camera is powered by a 6 volt 2CR5 lithium battery and the dimensions are 148.5 x 92.5 x 67.5mm (5-7/8 x 3-5/8 x 2-11/16 in.) This camera also has four exposure modes: P mode (Programmed AE) automatic control os aperture and shutter speed, A mode (Aperture-priority AE) any available aperture in 0.5 EV increments, S mode (Shutter-priority AE) any shutter speed from 1/2000 to 30 sec. selectable in 1 EV increments, and M mode (Manual) any shutter speed/aperture combination selectable. The camera is fitted with a Konica Minolta 70-210mm f/4.5-5.6 II Zoom Lens for Maxxum Series SLR Cameras (Black). The Lens has 10 elements in 10 groups and a minimum focusing distance of 3.6 feet. The camera plus lens pictured here is in fine condition and worth $35.00 for the camera and $15.00 for the lens in 2017.
Minolta: Maxxum 5 camera  Minolta: Maxxum 52001  201420.001997 Fine condition worth $110.00 in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum 50 camera  Minolta: Maxxum 502004  200930.002003 Fine condition worth $75.00 in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum 5000 camera  Minolta: Maxxum 50001986  201515.001986 fine condition worth $25.00 & $20.00 for the lens in 2015
Minolta: Maxxum 5000i camera  Minolta: Maxxum 5000i1989  201415.001989 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum 5000i camera  Minolta: Maxxum 5000i1989  20155.001989 Poor condition worth $1.00 in parts in 2015 ( will not turn on)
Minolta: Maxxum 5000i camera  Minolta: Maxxum 5000i1989  201610.001989 Poor condition worth $2.00 in parts in 2016 ( will turn on but erratic)
Minolta: Maxxum 5xi camera  Minolta: Maxxum 5xi1992  201110.001992 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum 70 camera  Minolta: Maxxum 702004  201115.002003 Fine condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum 7000 camera  Minolta: Maxxum 70001985  201610.001985 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2016
Minolta: Maxxum 9000 AF camera  Minolta: Maxxum 9000 AF1985  199435.001985 Good condition worth $140.00 with the motor drive in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum HTsi camera  Minolta: Maxxum HTsi1998  20169.001998 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Minolta: Maxxum STsi camera  Minolta: Maxxum STsi1999  201415.002003 Fine condition worth $55.00 with the lens in 2014
Minolta: Maxxum STsi camera  Minolta: Maxxum STsi1999  201620.001999 Fine condition Worth $40.00 in 2016
Minolta: Memory Maker 2000 camera  Minolta: Memory Maker 2000c2000  20163.00The Minolta Memory Maker 2000 is a 35mm Focus Free Camera manufactured in the late 90’s. This camera has point and shoot ease, with an extra-large viewfinder and auto flash with red-eye reduction and a high quality Minolta lens. It uses 35mm film and 2 AA batteries to operate. The camera and strap were made in China but the Minolta Company was and still is based in Japan. The camera also has a built in lens cover that locks the shutter release when closed, auto film advance, auto rewind, frame counter that resets when the back cover is opened, film view window in the back, flash ready LED close to the viewfinder, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, easy film load method, works with DX coded film, and has a handy carry strap.
Minolta: Memory Maker III camera  Minolta: Memory Maker III1995  200410.001995 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta 110 Zoom Date camera  Minolta: Minolta 110 Zoom Datec1998  20135.001998 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (1 of 2)
Minolta: Minolta 16 II camera  Minolta: Minolta 16 II1960-1966  201315.001960-1972 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta 16 II camera  Minolta: Minolta 16 II1960-1966  199110.001960-1972 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta 16 II camera  Minolta: Minolta 16 II1960-1966  201515.001960-1972 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014 (with box & instructions)
Minolta: Minolta AF Tele camera  Minolta: Minolta AF Tele1985  20163.001985 Poor condition worth $1.50 in 2016
Minolta: Minolta AF Tele 60 camera  Minolta: Minolta AF Tele 60c1989  20125.001985 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (1 of 2)
Minolta: Minolta Autopak 270 camera  Minolta: Minolta Autopak 2701977  20165.00This is as the name suggests a 110 pocket camera released by Minolta in 1977. It has a Rokkor 1:3.5/26mm (4 glass elements in 3 groups) lens with a continuous slide button with 5 symbols and 1 click stop on the top of the camera. Exposure control is programmed with two automatic changed apertures of f3.5 plus f8 and an electronic shutter with step speeds from 1/330 of a second to 10 seconds. The usable film speeds for the 110 16mm film cartridges are ASA 64 to 125. The camera uses a 4.5v K-size #538 battery to power the flash cubes, exposure control, and shutter speeds. The viewfinder is a bright frame finder with an LED indicator for insufficient light and distance symbols. The flash mount is for magi-cubes and the camera has a cable shutter release. It also a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, a two conductor hot shoe, and a built-in slide-across close-up lens at 50cm with automatic parallax correction in viewfinder. The dimensions are 132×58×26mm and the weight is 190g with the film. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Minolta: Minolta Autopak 400X camera  Minolta: Minolta Autopak 400X1972  201210.001972 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta Autopak 430EX camera  Minolta: Minolta Autopak 430EX1978  20142.001978-1990 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta Autopak 450E camera  Minolta: Minolta Autopak 450E1976 20155.001977 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2015 (shutter and film advance problem)
Minolta: Minolta Autopak 460T camera  Minolta: Minolta Autopak 460T1979  19905.001979 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta Autopak 460TX camera  Minolta: Minolta Autopak 460TX1979 20177.00The Minolta Pocket Autopak 460Tx is a sophisticated little viewfinder camera for the popular type No. 110 16mm film cassettes. It was launched in 1979 by Minolta. The built-in electronic flash pops out to the side when switched on. The x at the end of the name stands for extra and separates it from the Autopak 460T. The main difference is an illuminated distance scale on top of the camera when the flash is activated (because you're shooting in the dark). Switchable 26mm (f3.5-f8.0) / 43mm (f4.7-f13.5), zone focusing (3.3ft to infinity) lens. The camera has a mechanical shutter with a speed of 1/200 of a second. A CDS meter provides programmed exposure control and it has a 3-position aperture setting, for sun, cloudy, or flash. The camera works best with ASA 100 or 400 speed film. The telephoto lens is also a good macro: the view from 3.3 foot is only 9x11", about the same as when using some close-up lenses. The viewfinder shows a red warning LED if the built-in flash needs to be selected and there is also an audible low-light alarm. When the flash is selected, the distance scale glows green for easy focusing. The viewfinder LED and an external orange light flicker when the flash is ready. It also has a built-in sliding lens cover that when closed locks the shutter. The camera has no close-up lens, tripod socket, or cable release socket. The camera uses a single AA cell and the dimensions are 1 1/8” tall x 2 3/8” wide x 6 1/2" long. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Minolta: Minolta Autopak 600X camera  Minolta: Minolta Autopak 600X1971  19905.001971 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta Autopak 600X camera  Minolta: Minolta Autopak 600X1971  201310.001971 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta Autopak 800 camera  Minolta: Minolta Autopak 8001969  201510.001969 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Minolta: Minolta Disc-5 camera  Minolta: Minolta Disc-51983 20166.00The Minolta Disc-5 is a simple, flat camera for Disc film cartridges, a format introduced by Kodak in 1982 and this camera was introduced soon after in 1983. The Disc-5 has 2 shutter speeds, 1/100 of a second and 1/200 of a second. It uses a fixed focus 12.5mm f/2.8 lens combined with a selenium cell controlled aperture to expose the film. A sliding door in front of the viewfinder also closes the lens so both are covered when not in use. This model was also available in designer patterns and colors but named the Courrèges AC 101. Like many of the Kodak disc cameras it has a lifetime battery that should not be exchanged by the user for it is very difficult. It was amazing how many years the battery lasted even with a built in flash. The camera also uses a slide selector under the lens for close-up and landscape. When slid in the close-up position a lens is placed in front of the original but does not change the viewfinder. Although the quality of the pictures with this camera was better than most, it still was not great and this led to the demise of the disc film. The only other feature is a swivel hard point for a carry strap. This camera like most Disc-5’s has a dead battery but is listed in fine condition for its historic value. The camera pictured here is worth $10.00 in 2016.
Minolta: Minolta Disc-7 camera  Minolta: Minolta Disc-71983 20164.00The Minolta Disc 5 and 7 were the first Minolta cameras that use the film disc launched by Kodak in 1982. They both have automatic exposure by Selenium cell, with automatic flash, advances automatic film, and are powered by a long life lithium batteries that at that time were replaced by the manufacturer but the internal OEM lithium batteries can be replaced with two common 123A batteries with a soldering iron and some difficulty (not worth it). The camera is provided with an f2.8 12.5mm lens, consisting of 4 elements in 4 groups. The optical glass is treated. The focusing is fixed to 1.2 meter to infinity, with a sliding lens position of closer focusing from 0.4 to 1.2 meter. The viewfinder has luminous framework with correction of parallax and indications of the symbols of focusing. The shutter speeds are 1/100 to 1/200 of a second and the aperture CDS controlled. The Disc 7 was introduced and sold by Minolta in 1983. The Disc 7 had one remarkable feature which stood it apart from other disc cameras. In the center of the front plate was a small convex mirror, which could be used by the photographer to compose a self-portrait. It also has a pivot arm with a carry strap hard point, shutter release socket, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount. The pivoting arm allows you to set the camera on a flat surface for a timed photo. The timer is set with a slide switch next to the mirror that has a LED that flashes when engaged. The camera retailed for $122.50 when new and you could buy an extender kit for $40.00 plus $10.00 for a case. The camera pictured here is in Good esthetic condition but the batteries are dead and for that reason it is worth $10.00 in 2016.
Minolta: Minolta Electro-Shot camera  Minolta: Minolta Electro-Shot1965  201410.001965 Poor condition worth $2.00 for parts in 2014
Minolta: Minolta FS 35 camera  Minolta: Minolta FS 351989  20153.001989 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Minolta: Minolta SRT-101 camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-1011966  200110.001966-1976 good condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta SRT-101 camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-1011966  201510.001966-1976 good condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Minolta: Minolta SRT-101 camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-1011966  201615.001966-1976 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Minolta: Minolta SRT-102 camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-1021973  201620.001973 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Minolta: Minolta SRT-200 camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-2001975  201615.00The SRT 200 was introduced in 1975 and the base model SRT 100 was updated in 1975 when the other models were altered. The cameras remained similar to the previous budget models but with the top shutter speed increased from 1/500 of a second to 1/1000 of a second. The major specifications of the budget SRT bodies were as follows: (1) Single lens reflex camera with through-the-lens CLC (Contrast Light Compensator) meter coupled to shutter and film speed. (2)Meter sensitivity EV 3 to EV 17 at ASA 100. (3)Film speeds supported ASA 6-6400. (4) Fully mechanical cloth focal plane shutter with speeds from 1-1/1000 of a second plus B. (5) Shutter speeds 1-1/60 sec with electronic flash. (6) Oversized quick return mirror for no image cut-off even with super telephoto lenses. (7) Exposure control needle visible in viewfinder. (8) Flash synchronization (X and FP). (9) Automatic reset film counter. (10) Accessory shoe. As with the original SR-T 100, the later budget models do not have a lot to recommend it when other more fully featured models are now available for similar prices. At the time, however, it remained an attractive option for someone seeking a fully mechanical body with a limited budget. The Minolta SRT 100X (or rebadged SRT 200 released in the U.S. and Canada in 1975) launched in 1977 and was the last camera of Minolta's SRT series of robust SLR bodies with TTL match-needle-meter instrument in the viewfinder. A variant in 1979 had a simpler single cell meter instead of the CLC meter of the SRT series. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $35.00 in 2016.
Minolta: Minolta SRT-201 camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-2011975  201220.001977-1981 Good condition worth $55.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta SRT-201 camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-2011975  201515.001977-1981 Poor condition worth $5.00 for parts in 2015
Minolta: Minolta SRT-201 camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-2011975  201515.001977-1981 fine condition worth $100.00 in 2015
Minolta: Minolta SRT-202 camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-2021975  201515.001975-1977 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2015
Minolta: Minolta SRT-SC camera  Minolta: Minolta SRT-SC1975-1980  201535.001973-1975 Good condition worth $50.00 in 2015 plus a $25.00 lens
Minolta: Minolta X-370 camera  Minolta: Minolta X-3701984-1990  201520.001984 Poor condition and worth $5.00 for parts and the lens is in fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015 (film advance is jammed)
Minolta: Minolta X-370 camera  Minolta: Minolta X-3701984-1990  201630.001984 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2016. The Albinar ADG 28mm 2.8 lens on the camera is in fine condition and worth $25.00 with $5.00 for the books for the camera in 2016. The JCPenny 80-205mm lens is in fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016. The Albinar 135mm is in fine condition worth $20.00 in 2016. A estimate for the set is $95.00 in 2016.
Minolta: Minolta X-570 camera  Minolta: Minolta X-5701983  201610.00The Minolta X-570 (X-500 in Europe) was introduced in 1983 as a lower cost alternative to the X-700. It used the same chassis as the rest of the Minolta X series and the standard Minolta SR mount. The primary difference between the top-of-the-line X-700 and the X-570 is that the latter lacked the fully automatic Program exposure mode. However, the X-570 added an important feature that would be part of all subsequent X series cameras, but never added to the X-700, a match LED exposure meter. This system indicated the selected shutter speed with a blinking LED and the suggested shutter speed, based on the exposure value and the selected lens aperture, with a solid LED. Some consider the X-500 more of an enthusiast's camera than the X-700, since it offered no P mode and therefore required some photographic knowledge. The camera takes two 675 pill batteries to power it including the shutter. It also was designed for a motor drive attachment (model M-1), complete with 3 contact points and a ground contact. The camera also has a hot shoe with three contact for the flash unit. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and does not respond. For this reason it is worth $3.00 for parts in 2016.
Minolta: Minolta X-700 camera  Minolta: Minolta X-7001981-1982  201315.001981-2001 Fine condition worth $45.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta X-700 camera  Minolta: Minolta X-7001981-1982  200810.001981-2001 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta X-7A camera  Minolta: Minolta X-7A1985  199410.001985 Poor condition worth $5.00 for parts in 2014
Minolta: Minolta XE-5 camera  Minolta: Minolta XE-51975  201610.00The Minolta XE-5 is one year younger and the less advanced sibling of the Minolta XE 35mm SLR cameras. It was introduced in 1975 and was not sold on the Japanese home market. The XE-5 also has a fixed finder and the vertical running metal blade shutter, as well as the bright viewfinder with the convenient exposure meter scale to the right, for either manual or automatic operation. However, the double exposure facility has gone, as has a few other minor details. The on/off switch is at the rear, but the film advance indicator is gone. The traditional two conductor hot-shoe is at the top of the finder. The prism housing is all black and when new it came with a MC Rokkor-X PF 1:1.7 f=50mm lens. The exposure setting is either meter-assisted manual or aperture-priority automatic. In the manual mode, the recommended shutter speed on the meter scale in the viewfinder must be compared to that set on the dial. The automatic mode is selected by setting the shutter speed dial to A. The electronically controlled shutter has manually selectable speeds from 4 seconds to 1/1000 second and a backup mechanical 1/90 second plus B. The shutter-speed dial locks in the A position, easily released by a tiny button reached when gripping the dial. The film speed is set on a dial surrounding the rewind knob. A small button just next to the viewfinder housing releases the ASA-dial. To the left on the same dial is an exposure compensation scale of ±2 EV, which may easily be set depressing a button on the dial edge. The camera operates on a 3V silver battery or two 1.5V SR44 batteries. The XE-5 also has a battery check lever with a red LED, lens release button, PC X sync socket, lens diaphragm stop-down button, a traditional self-timer with trigger button, rewind release button, tripod socket, and the battery compartment. The camera pictured here is in blank condition and worth $0.00 in 2016.
Minolta: Minolta XG-1 camera  Minolta: Minolta XG-11979  201616.001979-1984 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Minolta: Minolta XG-7 camera  Minolta: Minolta XG-71977  199020.001977 good condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta XG-A camera  Minolta: Minolta XG-A1982  201310.001981 Good condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Minolta: Minolta XG-M camera  Minolta: Minolta XG-M1982  201315.001981 Fine condition worth $50.00 in 2015
Minolta: Minolta XG-M camera  Minolta: Minolta XG-M1982  20155.001981 Poor condition worth $5.00 for parts in 2015
Minolta: Riva Zoom 70 EX camera  Minolta: Riva Zoom 70 EX1994  20155.001993-1996 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (Minolta Freedom Zoom 70EX)
Minolta: Riva Zoom 70 W camera  Minolta: Riva Zoom 70 W1995  20166.00This stylish pocket-sized "capsule" 35mm Minolta Freedom Zoom Explorer camera was introduced in 1997 and features a built-in wide-angle 28 to 70mm lens. Designed for both scenic shots and close-ups, the Minolta Freedom Zoom Explorer lets you select panorama mode and date imprinting at any time. Users may also choose between selectable exposures mode to ensure proper exposure for close-up, night portrait, or landscape/night view shots every time. This camera also offers precise, three-beam active infrared autofocus for sharp pictures. The built-in automatic flash system includes "soft flash" for close-ups, along with red-eye reduction, auto flash, flash fill, and cancel flash. Film advance and rewind are automatic and fuss free, and users can select continuous advance or mid roll rewind. The Minolta Freedom Zoom Explorer also features a 10-second self-timer setting and wireless remote control release. The camera originally sold in a kit and along with the camera, the kit includes a carrying case, strap, film, batteries, remote control, and a two-year warranty. This camera has a “great” film economics. It will squeeze every frame it can get out the film and this comes in handy when it is in the 1.2 fps continuous drive mode. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Minolta: Vectis 2000 camera  Minolta: Vectis 20001999  20125.001999 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Minolta: Vectis 2000 camera  Minolta: Vectis 20001999  20165.001999 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Minolta: Vectis 260 camera  Minolta: Vectis 2601999  20135.001999 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Vectis 300 camera  Minolta: Vectis 3001998  20105.001999 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Minolta: Vectis GX 1 camera  Minolta: Vectis GX 11997  20135.001997 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Vectis GX 1 camera  Minolta: Vectis GX 11997  20095.001997 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Minolta: Vectis S-1 camera  Minolta: Vectis S-11996 201715.00The Minolta Vectis S-series comprises two APS system models of film SLR cameras made by Minolta, the flagship model Vectis S-1 and the Vectis S-100. The cameras feature a compact design, owing to the use of mirrors instead of prisms in the viewfinder. The Vectis V-lenses used by these models are not compatible with any other lens mount, including Minolta's 35mm A-mount and SR-mount systems, and there are no options to adapt them to other camera systems since the aperture and focus are controlled electronically, the image circle of the lenses captures the APS formats, and the flange focal distance of the V-mount is only 36.00 mm. Only an early DSLR camera body, the Minolta Dimâge RD 3000, also used the V-lens mount. The Vectis brand was also shared with a number of small APS rangefinder cameras with fixed lenses, including the waterproof Vectis Weathermatic and Vectis GX series. The model numbers of these cameras don't include the S prefix used for the SLR series. S-1 cameras sold in the United States came in a silver/pewter color only, but in some other countries (Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands and perhaps elsewhere in Europe) a black (some say dark slate gray) body was available. Combined with the 22-80 and 80-240mm zoom lenses, the S-1 makes a light and compact kit for travel photogaphy. Both of these lenses allow switching to manual focus. Some users prefer the 25-150 lens for the range covered in a single lens. The 25-150 does not have the manual focus option. Standard "kit" lenses for the S-1 were the 28-56 and 56-170mm. The autofocus is switchable to manual focusing by pressing the shutter release button halfway and turning the focusing ring of the lens tube. Some lenses don't support that feature but can be switched to manual focusing with the AF/M button on the lens barrel. The Vectis S-1 was released in 1996 and manufactured by Minolta’s plant in Malaysia. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $35.00 in 2017.
Minolta: Weathermatic 35 DL (Dual) camera  Minolta: Weathermatic 35 DL (Dual)1987 20158.001987 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Minolta: Weathermatic 35 DL (Dual) camera  Minolta: Weathermatic 35 DL (Dual)1987 201710.00The Weathermatic 35DL issued by Minolta in 1987 is basically the same dual-focus compact camera as the Minolta AF-DL. The difference is the watertight camera body of the Weathermatic which makes it a real camera for aquanauts, with waterproofing to 5m (16.4ft). The electrically driven dual focus lens is hidden behind a water-tight window and the one 6V lithium or four AAA battery compartment is sealed. A big sports finder can be mounted to ease usage under water with goggles. A button on the back of the camera enables "macro" close-ups underwater. The camera was originally supplied in a bright yellow kit bag with several accessories like a two roll film carrier, underwater viewfinder frame, and a carry strap. The 35 DL is solid and made from high-quality plastics. Below water, it operates in fixed-focus mode. Above water, it utilizes an infrared active-type autofocus with a range of 0.75 m (2.5ft) to infinity. A focus hold feature is available. Shutter lock is indicated by a red light next to the viewfinder. The flash is fully automatic; it cannot be turned on or off and has no adjustable settings. Film loading, transport, and rewind are also fully automatic and the camera lacks a button to rewind film in mid-roll. The camera has a 3.5/35mm, switchable to 5.6/50mm lens and the viewfinder magnification changes when the lens is switched. Also it works best with 35mm films of 100 ASA or 400 ASA film speed. The weight without batteries is 275g and it floats in water. The dimensions are 132×69.5×51mm. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $30.00 with the instructions in 2017.
Minolta: Weathermatic A camera  Minolta: Weathermatic A1980  201510.001980 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts (shutter intermittent & flash not working)
Minox: Minox 35 EL camera  Minox: Minox 35 EL1974 201717.00The Minox 35 EL is a miniature 35 mm camera, introduced in 1974 by Minox in Germany. It is known as the smallest 35 mm TTL camera in the world. When closed, it's about the size of a pack of cigarettes and can easily be hidden in a person's pocket. Although it's actually a consumer device, it became popular during the Cold War, as an alternative to the far more expensive sub-miniature cameras like the Minox B. It is equipped with a retractable 1:2.8 35 mm lens that has a focus-range from 90 cm (35 ½ inch) to infinity. It has an electronic light meter which can be read from the view finder. It also has an electro-mechanical shutter that is driven by a small electronic circuit mounted just behind the lens. The electronics are powered by 5.6V battery, such as the mercury based Duracell PX-27 (replacement battery Excell S27PX). The Minox 35 EL was so popular in the West that the Russians decided to duplicate it completely. The copy was built by Arsenal in Ukraine (former USSR) and was called the Kiev 35A. The dimensions were identical and every tiny detail was exactly duplicated, including the bright red button, one of the landmarks of the Minox. Accessories of the Minox 35 EL and the Kiev 35A are interchangeable. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $45.00 in 2017.
Minox: Minox IIIs (chrome) camera  Minox: Minox IIIs (chrome)1954-1963  201320.001954 Poor condition worth $25.00 for parts in 2014 (shutter not working)
Miranda: Miranda Sensorex camera  Miranda: Miranda Sensorex1968-1972  199020.001967-1972 good condition worth $70.00 in 2014
Miranda: Miranda Sensorex camera  Miranda: Miranda Sensorex1968-1972  199620.001967-1972 Good condition worth $75.00 in 2014
Monarch: Pickwik camera  Monarch: Pickwikc1939  201510.001939 Fine condition worth $35.00 with the original box plus instruction manual in 2015
Monarch: Royal Reflex camera  Monarch: Royal Reflexc1939  20156.001939 Good condition worth $12.00 in 2015
New Taiwan: Akira 7000 DVT (Lens Made In Japan) camera  New Taiwan: Akira 7000 DVT (Lens Made In Japan)c1980s 20060.001985-1989 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Akira PC-606 (Free Focus) camera  New Taiwan: Akira PC-606 (Free Focus)c1980s 20163.00Akira PC-606 is a mostly-plastic 35mm Compact Camera and was introduced about the 90’s. The aperture is fixed at 16 with no adjustment and it has a 34mm plastic lens. The camera has a frame counter on the bottom, two conductor hot shoe, rewind release button, rewind crank handle, optical viewfinder, and a handy carry strap. The camera also has a frame advance thumb wheel that is mounted in the center bottom of the back cover for use with either thumb. The camera was made in blue, red, black and the white. The camera was made in Taiwan and has nothing to do with Ogihara Akira one of the founders of the Miranda Camera Company. This camera was labeled with many brand names and produced in as many colors. The camera pictured here is in New condition and worth $8.00 in 2016.
New Taiwan: Akira TC-002 (New Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Akira TC-002 (New Optical Lens)c1980s 2007.501985 good condition worth $3.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: AP-203 (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: AP-203 (Focus Free)c1990s  20065.001990-1995 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: ASI (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: ASI (Focus Free)c1990  20031.001990 New condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Benz-Gant Helioflex 3000T (New Color Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Benz-Gant Helioflex 3000T (New Color Optical Lens)1999  20143.001999 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Canon Q5200  (Optical Lens Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Canon Q5200 (Optical Lens Focus Free)1985-1989  199510.001985-1989 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 also the (Sakura S5300 motor drive)
New Taiwan: Capital KX-100 (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Capital KX-100 (Focus Free)c1990  20104.001990 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Capital MX-II (Capital Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Capital MX-II (Capital Optical Lens)c1980s 20174.50The Capital MX-II 35mm camera with Capital optical auto-fix focus 50mm 1.6 lens was Made in 1986 in Taiwan. The original set came with zip up bag for the camera, lens cover, carry strap, camera instructions, and the camera. Capital cameras were marketed by United States Sales Corporation and only two cameras were found to have the Capital label. These are the MX-II and the KX100 35mm camera (a focus free, point and shoot, plastic camera with a hot shoe). The MX-II Capital is just another name put on these Taiwan cameras with the same design and lenses. All these cameras have a 50mm 1.6 lens with weather icons for aperture settings, the zip-up case, lens cover, and instructions. Cameras like the Lynx PPL 500XL in 1985 and the Ceptre YN 500 in 1990. The Lavec Company (Taiwan) also produce these cheap cameras in the Lavec name like the Lavec LT-002 and the TC-305. The MX-II produces picture results similar the Holga and the Diana but lacks the following. The camera is also weighted inside to give it the feel of a camera with more class. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $8.00 in 2017.
New Taiwan: DH-1000 (Optical Color Lens) camera  New Taiwan: DH-1000 (Optical Color Lens)c1967  19982.001985 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Frog (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Frog (Focus Free)c1960s  20021.001995 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
New Taiwan: Hachi X1000 (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Hachi X1000 (Focus Free)1995  20002.001995 New condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Hachi X1000 (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Hachi X1000 (Focus Free)1995  20002.001995 New condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Konex MX-V (Optical Color Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Konex MX-V (Optical Color Lens)c1990  20155.00This all plastic camera was made by the Lavec Company and was branded with the Konex label alt-hough Lavec does not appear on the box or camera. The camera has a 50mm fixed lens with a 6ft mini-mum shooting range. Kinectic Marketing put their name on the lens of the Time Magazine camera and others as Kinectic Optical but this this lens only has “OPTICAL COLOR LENS”. All the badging on these type cameras was meant to be confusing to camouflage its true nature of being a cheap plastic camera. The camera takes 35mm film with a recommended speed of 100 or 125 ASA. The lens on this camera was used in many cheap cameras over the years from a TIME magazine give away in 1984 to well into the 90’s with Cameras like the Lynx PPL 500XL in 1985 and the Ceptre YN 500 in 1990. The Lavec Company did produce these cheap cameras in the Lavec name like the Lavec LT-002 and the TC-305. This 1990 camera picture above is in X-Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2015.
New Taiwan: Life (Color Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Life (Color Optical Lens)1984  199710.00This mostly plastic camera was a free gift from LIFE magazine made by the Lavec Company for Time Life and was not sold at any time. It has a 50mm fixed lens with a 6ft minimum shooting range. Kinectic Optical is the name on what is clearly the same lens on the Time Magazine camera and countless others in this same era. The badging on these type cameras was meant to be confusing and in my opinion this was done to reinvent the camera to entice more unsuspecting customers. It takes 35mm film with a recommended speed of 100 or 125 ASA. The lens on this camera was used in many cheap cameras over the years from this Life give away in 1984 to well into the 90’s with Cameras like the Lynx PPL 500XL in 1985 and the Ceptre YN 500 in 1990. The Lavec Company did produce these cheap cameras and made cameras in the Lavec name like the Lavec LT-002 and the TC-305. The number of these cameras with so many creative names is impossible to ascertain. The camera picture is in X-Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2015.
New Taiwan: LT-006 (Lavec Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: LT-006 (Lavec Optical Lens)c1990  20163.001995 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2016
New Taiwan: Lynx PPL 500XL (Color Optical Glass Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Lynx PPL 500XL (Color Optical Glass Lens)c1980s  19915.00The Lynx PPL 500XL was produced by the Lavec Company and has a 50mm fixed lens with a 6ft minimum shooting range. It takes 35mm film with a recommended speed of 100 or 125 ASA. The lens on this camera was used in many cheap cameras over the years by Lavec, from a Life give away in 1984 and into the 90’s with Cameras like the Ceptre YN 500 in 1990. They did produce cameras in the Lavec name like the Lavec LT-002 and the TC-305. This camera came out in about 1985 and is almost all plastic with a real glass lens. The camera picture above is in Fine condition and worth $5.00 in 2015.
New Taiwan: Maximatic MF-101X (Lens Made In Japan) camera  New Taiwan: Maximatic MF-101X (Lens Made In Japan)c1990  20165.001990 New condition worth $15.00 in 2016
New Taiwan: Mitsuba (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Mitsuba (Focus Free)c1990s  20161.00This camera is a 1990’s point and shoot 35mm with a built in flash. It has a 35mm fixed focus lens with a built in lens cover that has a slide switch under the lens in the front. The camera is easy to load with film with its thumb wheel film advance. The flash unit has a slid on/off switch located on the front of the camera under the flash and a flash ready LED on the top to the left center. It also has a film ASA view window on the back cover and a frame counter window on the bottom right of the camera body. The shutter button is connected to the lens cover and will not engage when the cover is closed. The camera operates on one AA alkaline battery stored in a compartment on the side of the camera. The last thing this camera has is an imbedded wrist carry strap. The manufacturer is Black Market Antiques according to research. The camera pictured here is in New condition and worth $5.00 in 2016.
New Taiwan: Olympia Big Royal View (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Olympia Big Royal View (Focus Free)c1989  199410.001989 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Ouyama 2000H  (Optical Lens Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Ouyama 2000H (Optical Lens Focus Free)c1980s  20005.001989 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Panorama Normal (Focus Free Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Panorama Normal (Focus Free Optical Lens)c2002  20163.00This is a plastic toy like camera with a built in flash. To the left of the viewfinder you will find a lever that when in panorama (P) position, it crops the film inside and the viewfinder. The lens is a 35mm fixed focus f9.0. The camera has a mechanical shutter with 1/100 of a second shutter speed. It also has a reverse Galilean type viewfinder, exposure counter, fold down rewind crank, rewind film release button, built in lens cover, flash ready LED, film advance thumb wheel, film view window in the back cover, lens ring selector for cover open plus with flash, and a strap eyelet. The built in flash recycle time is 10 seconds and the flash is powered by three AAA batteries. The production start date is unknown but this camera was made in China around 2002. The camera pictured here is New in the box with the instruction pamphlet plus lifetime warranty paper. It is worth $10.00 in 2016.
New Taiwan: Photoflex MX-35 (fake meter, Photoflex Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Photoflex MX-35 (fake meter, Photoflex Optical Lens)c1970s  20095.001970's fine condition worth $7.50 in 2014
New Taiwan: Quickshot DI-4410 Mango (New Color Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Quickshot DI-4410 Mango (New Color Optical Lens)c1990s  20153.001999 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2015
New Taiwan: Quickshot X3000 (pseudo-SLR, New Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Quickshot X3000 (pseudo-SLR, New Optical Lens)c1980  20125.001992 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Quickshot X3000 (viewfinder, New Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Quickshot X3000 (viewfinder, New Optical Lens)c1980  19995.001990 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Rokinon 35HD (Focus Free Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Rokinon 35HD (Focus Free Optical Lens)c1980s  20155.001972 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
New Taiwan: Rokinon Digital camera  New Taiwan: Rokinon Digitalc2000  20155.002001 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015 (5.0MP)
New Taiwan: Sceptre YN 500 (Sceptre Optical Color Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Sceptre YN 500 (Sceptre Optical Color Lens)c1980s  19975.001990 Fine condition worth $8.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Sports Illustrated (Kinetic Optical Color Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Sports Illustrated (Kinetic Optical Color Lens)c1986  199910.00This mostly plastic camera was a free gift from Sports Illustrated magazine made by the Lavec Company was not sold at any time. It has a 50mm fixed lens with a 6ft minimum shooting range. Kinectic Optical is the name on what is clearly the same lens on the Time Magazine camera and countless others in this same era. The badging on these type cameras was meant to be confusing and in my opinion this was done to reinvent the camera to entice more unsuspecting customers. It takes 35mm film with a recommended speed of 100 or 125 ASA. The lens on this camera was used in many cheap cameras over the years from this Life give away in 1984 to well into the 90’s with Cameras like the Lynx PPL 500XL in 1985 and the Ceptre YN 500 in 1990. The Lavec Company did produce these cheap cameras and made cameras in the Lavec name like the Lavec LT-002 and the TC-305. The number of these cameras with so many creative names is impossible to ascertain. The camera picture is in X-Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2015.
New Taiwan: Suprema GP 101 (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Suprema GP 101 (Focus Free)c1990s  20145.002003 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Suprema GP 101 (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Suprema GP 101 (Focus Free)c1990s  20125.002003 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Suprema GP 101 (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Suprema GP 101 (Focus Free)c1990s  20053.002003 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Suprema GP 101 (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Suprema GP 101 (Focus Free)c1990s  20075.002003 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: The Humane Society (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: The Humane Society (Focus Free)1985  20141.001985 fine condition worth $3.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: The Humane Society (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: The Humane Society (Focus Free)1985  20091.001985 fine condition worth $3.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Time (Kinetic Optical Glass Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Time (Kinetic Optical Glass Lens)1984  20005.00This mostly plastic camera was a free gift from Time magazine made by the Lavec Company and was not sold at any time. It has a 50mm fixed lens with a 6ft minimum shooting range. Kinectic Optical is the name on what is clearly the same lens on the Sports Illustrated Magazine camera and countless others in this same era. The badging on these type cameras was meant to be confusing and in my opinion this was done to reinvent the camera to entice more unsuspecting customers. It takes 35mm film with a recommended speed of 100 or 125 ASA. The lens on this camera was used in many cheap cameras over the years from this Life give away in 1984 to well into the 90’s with Cameras like the Lynx PPL 500XL in 1985 and the Ceptre YN 500 in 1990. The Lavec Company did produce these cheap cameras and made cameras in the Lavec name like the Lavec LT-002 and the TC-305. The number of these cameras with so many creative names is impossible to ascertain. The camera picture is in Good condition and worth $8.00 in 2015.
New Taiwan: Trump Plaza (New Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Trump Plaza (New Optical Lens)c1990  20155.00This all plastic camera was made by the Lavec Company and was branded with the Trump Plaza label. Although Lavec does not appear on the camera they constructed it for the Trump Plaza’s promotional giveaway in 1984. Trump Plaza had other cameras labeled for promotions in later years but this one was the first. The camera has a 50mm fixed lens with a 6ft minimum shooting range. Kinectic Marketing put their name on the lens of the Time Magazine camera and others as Kinectic Optical but this lens only has “OPTICAL COLOR LENS”. All the badging on these type cameras was meant to be confusing to camouflage its true nature of being a cheap plastic camera. The camera takes 35mm film with a recom-mended speed of 100 or 125 ASA. The lens on this camera was used in many cheap cameras over the years from a TIME magazine give away also in 1984 to well into the 90’s with Cameras like the Lynx PPL 500XL in 1985 and the Ceptre YN 500 in 1990. The Lavec Company did produce these cheap cameras in the Lavec name like the Lavec LT-002 and the TC-305. This camera picture above is in X-Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2015.
New Taiwan: Ultronic (Color Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Ultronic (Color Optical Lens)c1980  20055.00It has a 50mm fixed lens with a 6ft minimum shooting range and is clearly the same lens on the Life Magazine camera and countless others in this same era. The badging on these type cameras was meant to be confusing and in my opinion this was done to reinvent the camera to entice more unsuspecting customers. It takes 35mm film with a recommended speed of 100 or 125 ASA. The lens on this camera was used in many cheap cameras over the years from this Life give away in 1984 to well into the 90’s with Cameras like the Lynx PPL 500XL in 1985 and the Ceptre YN 500 in 1990. The Lavec Company did produce these cheap cameras and made cameras in the Lavec name like the Lavec LT-002 and the TC-305. The number of these cameras with so many creative names is impossible to ascertain. The camera picture is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2015.
New Taiwan: Ultronic Panoramic (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Ultronic Panoramic (Focus Free)c1995  20082.00The lens which is a 28mm is set at F/11 and shutter speed is around 1/125th of a second. The camera is not really a panoramic but instead internally using about 40% of the center of the 35mm film resulting in an extreme crop to the image to give it the look of being panoramic. Upon research of the camera I found out it originally came free with a subscription to Time magazine that had these types of promotions often. Also most of the images seem to be the sharpest in the middle and become softer as it moves towards the edges. Made in China This camera has a built in lens cover, picture counter, panoramic view finder, film advance thumb wheel, rewind release button, rewind fold out leaver, and a handy carry strap. The circa 1995 camera pictured is in Fine condition and worth $5.00 in 2015.
New Taiwan: Ultronic Panoramic (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Ultronic Panoramic (Focus Free)c1995  20153.00The lens which is a 28mm is set at F/11 and the shutter speed is around 1/125th of a second. The camera is not really a panoramic but instead internally it blocks out about 40% of the outer edges of the 35mm film resulting in an extreme crop to the image to give it the look of being panoramic. At one point in the cameras production it came free with a subscription to Time magazine that had these types of promotions often. Also most of the images taken with the camera seem to be the sharpest in the middle and become softer as it moves towards the edges. This camera has a built in lens cover, picture counter, panoramic view finder, film advance thumb wheel, rewind release button, rewind fold out crank leaver, and a handy carry strap. The only thing other than plastic in this camera is the metal pin used for the hinge of the back film door. The Ultronic Panoramic was produce in 1995 by the Lavec Company and made in China. Lavec made cheap mostly plastic cameras and usually for promotions like Sports Illustrated, Time Magazine, Life Magazine, and more. Lavec did brand some cameras under the Lavec name like the Lavec LT-002 and the Lavec TC-305. These are also are cheap mostly plastic cameras. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $5.00 in 2015.
New Taiwan: Ultronic Panoramic (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: Ultronic Panoramic (Focus Free)c1995  20162.00The lens which is a 28mm is set at F/11 and shutter speed is around 1/125th of a second. The camera is not really a panoramic but instead internally using about 40% of the center of the 35mm film resulting in an extreme crop to the image to give it the look of being panoramic. Upon research of the camera I found out it originally came free with a subscription to Time magazine that had these types of promotions often. Also most of the images seem to be the sharpest in the middle and become softer as it moves towards the edges. Made in China This camera has a built in lens cover, picture counter, panoramic view finder, film advance thumb wheel, rewind release button, rewind fold out leaver, and a handy carry strap. The circa 1995 camera pictured above is in Fine condition and is worth $6.00 in 2016.
New Taiwan: Vista KX-500 (Lens Made In Japan) camera  New Taiwan: Vista KX-500 (Lens Made In Japan)c1990s  200510.002002 New condition worth $15.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: VistaView XL (Focus Free) camera  New Taiwan: VistaView XL (Focus Free)1994  20162.00The 1994 VistaView 35 XL is a fixed focus, fixed aperture and fixed shutter speed 35mm camera. It is almost all plastic, about the only metal part is the hotshoe and the wires that feed it. Putting film in it doubles the weight and quadruples the value of the camera. The camera also has a film rewind fold down crank handle, viewfinder, built in lens cover (also shutter lock), frame counter, rewind release button, thumb film advance wheel, and a handy carry strap. The camera was made in China and distributed by Cisco Sales Corporation located at 23775 Madison Street in Torrance, California. The camera came with a 90 day warranty that will replace or repair the camera for a $5.00 check or money order payable to Cisco. There is a flash unit flyer in the box so that you could purchase a Vista view electronic flash from the United States Purchasing Exchange in North Hollywood California, Item # 24694. The unit cost in 1994 was $9.95 with $2.00 shipping and handling. The back of the card is marked U.S. Sales Corporation. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
New Taiwan: Weston WX-7 (Weston Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Weston WX-7 (Weston Optical Lens)c1980s  199010.001985 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Weston WX-7 (Weston Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Weston WX-7 (Weston Optical Lens)c1980s  199510.001985 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
New Taiwan: Weston WX-7 (Weston Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Weston WX-7 (Weston Optical Lens)c1980s  20150.001985 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
New Taiwan: Yamasheta 35mm (Yamasheta Optical Lens) camera  New Taiwan: Yamasheta 35mm (Yamasheta Optical Lens)c1980s 20178.00The lens on the Yamasheta offers no surprises – it’s 50mm (more or less), fixed focus from 8 feet to infinity, and non-removable. There is only one shutter speed, which I have guesstimated is in the 1/60th – 1/100th range, as its true speed is not listed anywhere in the manual nor could I find it online. It does have four f-stops: 5.6, 8, 11, and 16, which is nice as most cameras in this quality range usually have between one to three f-stops. That gives you a bit more flexibility in choosing film speed, and on most days you should be able to use film between ISO 100-400. The hot shoe flash only adds to that flexibility by allowing you to shoot at night or indoors. Overall, the Yamasheta #SPCAM3 35MM camera has a lot to offer Lomographers. It has the wild, interesting, and unpredictable results we crave. It’s far from feature rich, but it offers enough flexibility for lots of film choice and use in various conditions. To top it all off, it’s a great value too. You can easily pick one up on eBay for $10-20, or less if you’re lucky enough to find it in a thrift shop. The Yamasheta 35MM is capable of creating very interesting results. Combined with its low price and reasonable flexibility, it makes a great addition to the collection of anyone who enjoys light leaks and overlapping frames. The camera is a New Taiwan 35mm (New Optical Lens) from the 1980’s. Most of the information was gleaned from the Lomography site. The camera pictured here is in New condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Nikon: Coolpix 3100 camera  Nikon: Coolpix 31002003  20105.002004 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (3.2MP)
Nikon: Coolpix 4100 camera  Nikon: Coolpix 41002004  201110.002004 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (4.0MP)
Nikon: Coolpix 4300 camera  Nikon: Coolpix 43002002  20165.00The Nikon Coolpix 4300 is a digital camera that was made by Nikon. It was first released on October 1, 2002 and is no longer in production. At 4.0 effective megapixels, it is capable of delivering 2,272 x 1,704 pixel images. An included lens cap protects its Nikkor 3x optical Zoom lens, with a focal length of 8 to 24 mm (equivalent of a field of view in 38 to 114 mm lens), as well as an aperture of f/2.8–4.9 and shutter speed of 8 seconds to 1/1,000 of a second. It is capable of ISO equivalents of 100, 200, and 400. Image viewing is done on its 1.5 inch TFT LCD screen, and Type 1 CompactFlash (CF) cards are its storage medium. It was designed to be powered by a rechargeable EN-EL1 lithium ion battery, but it also accepts the non-rechargeable 6V 2CR5/DL245 lithium battery. It weighs about 7.9 ounces without the battery or CF card, and its components are housed inside a body sized at 3.7 x 2.7 x 2.0 inches. Twelve of Nikon's scene modes were built into the camera, as well as the ability to record 320 x 240 resolution, 15 fps silent video clips in the QuickTime .MOV file format. This camera model was often criticized for its relatively short battery life. Moreover, it uses a non-standard battery type from an era where camera manufacturers liked to use proprietary shapes in order secure an after-market income. A further disadvantage is that the unit cannot be charged within the camera. To its credit, it uses CF cards and not one of the obsolete designs like MS, SM, or XD that severely restrict the use of competitive quality cameras of the time. Advantages are a well above average image quality regarding sharpness. The color rendition is accurate, especially regarding the critical leaf-green shades. It is, however, under-saturated, and often needs to be improved by subsequent processing. The camera has many setting options, but, unfortunately, saturation is not one of them. It also has a zoom-linked optical viewfinder. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Nikon: Coolpix L120 camera  Nikon: Coolpix L1202011  201620.00Great photos and superb HD movies begin with Nikon's high power 21x wide-angle optical Zoom-NIKKOR glass lens. This powerful zoom lens, with a 25-525mm range equivalent, closes the distance between you and your subjects. Whether it's a panoramic shot of the entire family on a favorite sledding hill, or a photo of your children playing in the backyard, you'll shoot effortlessly and accurately with the Coolpix L120. The camera has a 14 megapixels sensor, 1/2.3-inch CCD, 3-inch LCD 920k resolution viewfinder, 21x, f3.1-5.8, 25-525mm (35mm equivalent), (still/video) JPEG/MPEG-4 AVC H.264 (.MOV), Image stabilization, Storage media SD/SDHC/SDXC capable, takes ISO80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1,600, built in flash, auto white balance, Recording modes Easy Auto, Scene, Sport Continuous, Smart Portrait, Auto, Movie, focus modes Center AF, Face Detection, metering modes Evaluative, Center-weighted (when using up to 2x digital zoom), Spot (digital zoom of 2x or more), Color effects Standard, Vivid, Sepia, Black & White, Cyanotype, lens cap, and a handy carry strap. The Price (MSRP) was $279.99 in 2011 when it first was released. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $45.00 in 2016.
Nikon: Coolpix L18 camera  Nikon: Coolpix L182008  201410.002008 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (8.0MP)
Nikon: Coolpix L18 camera  Nikon: Coolpix L182008  201410.002008 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (8.0MP)
Nikon: Coolpix L24 camera  Nikon: Coolpix L242011  201515.002011 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (14MP)
Nikon: Coolpix S202 camera  Nikon: Coolpix S2022008  201410.002009 Good working condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (8.1MP)
Nikon: Coolpix S230 camera  Nikon: Coolpix S2302009  201510.002009 Fine condition worth $30.00 in 2015 (10MP)
Nikon: Coolpix S4100 camera  Nikon: Coolpix S41002011  201420.002011 Fine condition worth $45.00 in 2014 (14MP)
Nikon: Coolpix S550 camera  Nikon: Coolpix S5502008  201610.002008 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2016 (10.0 MP)
Nikon: Fun-Touch camera  Nikon: Fun-Touch1987  20115.001987 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014
Nikon: Lite-Touch Zoom 110S camera  Nikon: Lite-Touch Zoom 110S2002  20118.002002 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Nikon: Lite-Touch Zoom AF camera  Nikon: Lite-Touch Zoom AF1994  20085.001994 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Nikon: Nikkormat FT (same as Nikomat FT) camera  Nikon: Nikkormat FT (same as Nikomat FT)1965  201320.001965-1967 good condition worth $20.00 with the lens in 2014
Nikon: Nikkormat FT (same as Nikomat FT) camera  Nikon: Nikkormat FT (same as Nikomat FT)1965  201020.001965-1967 good condition worth $30.00 with the lens in 2014
Nikon: Nikkormat FTN (same as Nikomat FTN) camera  Nikon: Nikkormat FTN (same as Nikomat FTN)1967  201614.001967-1975 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2016
Nikon: Nikkormat FTN (same as Nikomat FTN) camera  Nikon: Nikkormat FTN (same as Nikomat FTN)1967  201640.00The Nikkormat (Nokomat)FTn was manufactured from 1967 to 1975. It simplified the lens mounting procedure of the rabbit ear Nikkor lenses. The meter coupling pin on the camera still had to be aligned with the meter coupling shoe on the lens, but the lens maximum aperture no longer had to be manually preset on the FTn. Instead, the lens aperture ring had to be turned back and forth to the smallest aperture (largest f-stop number) and then to the largest (smallest number) immediately after mounting to ensure that the lens and the FTn couple properly (Nippon Kogaku called it indexing the maximum aperture of the lens) and meter correctly. This system seems unwieldy to today's photographers, but it was more efficient and easier than before, and became second nature to Nikon and Nikkormat camera using photographers of the 1960s and 1970s. In addition, the FTn improved the metering system to the now classic Nikon 60/40 percent center weighted style. The viewfinder also added +/– over/underexposure metering markers and set shutter speed information. The FTn also offered a choice (made at purchase time or by replacement at factory service centers) of brighter fixed viewfinder focusing screens: Nippon Kogaku's standard Type J with central 4 mm micro prism focusing aid plus 12 mm etched circle indicating the area of the meter center weighting or the Type A with central 3 mm split image rangefinder plus 12 mm etched circle. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $60.00 with the lens in 2016.
Nikon: Nikon EM camera  Nikon: Nikon EM1979  201625.001979 fine condition worth $50.00 in 2014
Nikon: Nikon F2 camera  Nikon: Nikon F21971  201650.00The Nikon F2 is a professional level, interchangeable lens, 35 mm film, single-lens reflex (SLR) camera. It was manufactured by the Japanese optics company Nippon Kogaku K. K. (Nikon Corporation since 1988) in Japan from September 1971 to June 2000. It used a horizontal-travel focal plane shutter with titanium shutter curtains and a speed range of 1 to 1/2000 second (up to 10 seconds using the self-timer) plus Bulb and Time, and flash X-sync of 1/80th second. It had dimensions (with DE-1 head, see below) of 98 mm height, 152.5 mm width, 65 mm depth and 730 g weight. It was available in two colors: black with chrome trim and all black. The F2 is the second member of the long line of Nikon F-series professional level 35 mm SLRs that began with the Nikon F (manufactured 1959–1974) and followed each other in a sort of dynastic succession as the top-of-the-line Nikon camera. The other members were the F3 (1980–2001), F4 (1988–1996), F5 (1996–2005) and F6 (2004–present). The F-series do not share any major components except for the all-important bayonet lens mount ('F mount'). The camera pictured here is in good condition worth $70.00 with the lens in 2016.
Nikon: Nikon FM2 camera  Nikon: Nikon FM21983-1985  201520.001983-1948 good condition worth $100.00 in 2015
Nikon: Nikon L35 AF camera  Nikon: Nikon L35 AF1983  19915.001983 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Nikon: Nikon L35 AF camera  Nikon: Nikon L35 AF1983  20015.001983 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Nikon: Nikon L35 AW-AF camera  Nikon: Nikon L35 AW-AF1986 201710.00This camera has a very high quality 35/2.8 lens and autofocus above water. Underwater, you set the subject distance with a convenient dial. There is a nice big switch that turns the built-in flash on or off. The Action Touch sold for about $150 when introduced in 1986. The camera was produced for two years after which Nikon took it off the market and no company ever made a similar quality camera since. The Japanese concluded that nobody is intelligent enough to focus a camera manually under water. All the cheap underwater cameras introduced after the Action Touch were fixed focus underwater and came with lower quality lenses. This camera can be used underwater up to 10 feet (3.5m) making it great for snorkeling, taking to the beach, and using it in snow, or rain. The exposure system is a CdS cell with programmed auto exposure from EV6 (f2.8 at 1/8 sec) to EV17 (f17.5 at 1/430 sec) with ISO 100 film. The auto ISO range is 50 to 1600 and Non Dx film set to ISO 100. The Action Touch is a heavy duty camera and came with a black face plate. The two AA battery compartment is accessed through a 1 inch screw in metal disk located on the bottom of the camera. A version with an auto date function was called the Nikon L35AWAD that has a blue face plate with the L35AWAF using an orange face plate. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $45.00 in 2017.
Nikon: Nikon L35 TW-AD camera  Nikon: Nikon L35 TW-AD1986  20164.001962 Poor condition worth $1.00 in 2016
Nikon: Nikon N65 camera  Nikon: Nikon N652001  201612.002001 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2016
Nikon: Nikon N70 camera  Nikon: Nikon N701994  201620.00The Nikon F70 (or N70 as it is known in the U.S.) was a SLR camera manufactured by the Japanese Company Nikon. Introduced in 1994, it is the predecessor to the Nikon F80. This camera is known for its unusual user interface which uses a combination of function and set buttons along with the thumb wheel to navigate the nestled settings. It is quite different compared to other Nikon SLR's of the same era. The camera has 3D Matrix with eight-segment matrix sensor Built-in retractable flash with 3D Multi-Sensor Balanced Fill-Flash Vari-Program system, Large LCD information, coordinated in shape and color, with the control buttons F70D has built-in panorama mode (13 x 36mm) and printing data. The camera is powered by two 3V CR123A (or DL123) lithium batteries. The body has the Nikon F mount for quick lens change. The camera also has autofocus (Single Servo AF and Continuous Servo AF), manual focus with electronic rangefinder, focus tracking that is automatically activated when subject moves, and Nikon CMA274 autofocus module. This camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $25.00 plus $40.00 for the Micro-Nikkor-P Auto 55mm lens in 2016.
Nikon: Nikon N90s camera  Nikon: Nikon N90s1992  201650.00The Nikon N90s is a 35mm autofocus SLR using Nikon's F lens mount. It was targeted toward the advanced amateur or prosumer; its feature set is comparable to that of Nikon's current D100/200/300 SLRs. The name N90s was used for marketing in the United States; everywhere else, the camera was called the F90x. This camera was also used as the base for the Kodak DCS 400 series of digital SLRs. The N90s/F90x was introduced in 1994 and discontinued in 2001. The camera's predecessor, the N90/F90, was introduced in 1992 and discontinued in 1994. The successor to the N90s was the F100 introduced in 1998. This camera takes four AA batteries that are held in with a screw through the battery compartment cover. It also has auto focus, auto film advance, auto rewind, LCD mode screen, manual mode, auto focus tracking, shutter priority auto exposure control, Aperture priority auto exposure control, DX coded film switch, frame counter, instant return type reflex mirror, standard ISO-type hot shoe contact (slow sync, rear curtain sync), Red eye reduction, flash recommended LED, flash ready LED, battery power indicator, and a thumb wheel mode plus options selector. The camera is capable of using ISO 25 to 5000 if DX coded film and ISO 6 to 6400 can be manually set. The camera has Lithium niobate oscillator-controlled shutter speeds from 1/8300 of a second to 30 seconds and electromagnetically controlled Bulb setting is provided. The camera pictured here is worth $30.00 and the lens worth $60.00 in 2016.
Nikon: Nikon RF-10 camera  Nikon: Nikon RF-101992  20155.001992 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015 (this is a SmileTaker)
Nikon: Nikon TW 20 camera  Nikon: Nikon TW 201989  201615.00The Nikon TW20 (or Tele Touch 300 in America) is a compact auto focus camera released by Nikon in 1989. It was the follow-up model to the TW2. The TW20 could be switched between two focal lengths: 35 mm f/3,8 (3 elements, 3 groups) wide angle and 55 mm f/5,7 (5 elements, 5 groups) normal ("tele") mode. It was Nikon's first camera with a red-eye reduction mode. By sliding the lens cover open you turn the camera on and off. If the camera is left in tele mode, the lens will retract to wide mode after three minutes. The camera also has active autofocus with AF/AE lock, Auto-exposure with auto backlight compensation, focusing distance of 45 cm (wide) plus 59 cm (tele), built-in auto flash with auto fill flash (A button on the front prevents the flash from firing), self-timer with a mode for taking two consecutive shots with 5 seconds interval, auto-wind, auto-rewind, DX decoding from ISO 100 to 1000 in whole stops (Non-DX film defaults to ISO 100), CdS sensor, built-in date function in QD model, and it is powered by CR2025 cell or Panasonic CR-P2P/Duracell DL 223A 6V lithium battery. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Nikon: Nikon Zoom 700 VR camera  Nikon: Nikon Zoom 700 VR1994  20152.001994 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015 (Nikon Zoom Touch 105 VR QD)
Nikon: Nuvis 75i camera  Nikon: Nuvis 75i1996  20055.001996 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Nikon: Nuvis A 20 camera  Nikon: Nuvis A 201996-1997  20165.002002 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Nikon: One-Touch 100 camera  Nikon: One-Touch 1001988  20122.001988 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Nikon: One-Touch 200 camera  Nikon: One-Touch 200  20175.00The Nikon One Touch 200 also known as the Nikon W35 is a compact, viewfinder, film camera produced by Nikon in 1991. It featured parallax compensation marks, viewfinder LED indicator, self-timer, and a built-in flash, which fired automatically when light was not sufficient. The One Touch 200 also features autofocus and auto exposure. It is powered by two 1.5-volt AA-type alkaline manganese batteries. The camera has a 5 zone autofocus range, Nikon 35mm f/3.5 lens made of 3 elements in 3 groups, programmed electronic shutter, reverse Galilean Albada-type bright frame viewfinder, CdS sensor, programmed auto exposure control, auto film advance, automatic Film rewind, built in lens cover that is also an on/off switch plus flash on switch, frame counter, uses DX-coded film from 100 to 1000 ISO, mid-roll rewind button, flash cancel button, focus memory button, film cartridge confirmation window in the back cover, self-timer LED, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod socket. Nikon also came out with a quartz date version around the same release date in 1991, of both the One Touch 200 and the W35. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and worth $1.00 in 2017.
Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 70 camera  Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 701997  20155.001997 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 90 camera  Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 902001  201110.002001 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 90S camera  Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 90S2002 20105.002002 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 90S camera  Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 90S2002 20145.002002 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 90S camera  Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 90S2002 20155.002001 Poor condition worth $1.00 in 2014
Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 90S camera  Nikon: One-Touch Zoom 90S2002 20176.00Nikon Corporation is pleased to announce that the One•Touch Zoom 90s and One•Touch Zoom 90s QD, 2.4x zoom compact camera will be introduced in February 2002. Building upon the success of the One•Touch Zoom 90 (2000) that preceded it, the One•Touch Zoom 90s marks a refinement in design, with a translucent lens cover front accent that makes the camera more streamlined. The 2.4x f/4.8 to 10.5 zoom lens lets users frame subjects with ease within a 38-90mm range. Versatile flash accommodates most shooting conditions. Macro mode allows shooting as close as 30cm (12 in.) from the subject. Fully automatic operation makes it especially easy not to miss a photo opportunity. The camera also has a five mode flash system, auto film load, auto rewind, mid roll rewind, auto film advance, Macro button, 5/8” by ½” LCD menu screen, flash on/off button, red eye reduction, timer button, ¼” by ¾” LCD quartz date back with program buttons, Dx coding, film view window, zoom in/out buttons, ¼” 20 thread tripod munt, flash ready LED, and a handy carry strap. The camera pictured above is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Nikon: Zoom-Touch 400 camera  Nikon: Zoom-Touch 4001990  20157.001990 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts in 2015 (unresponsive)
No Name: Focus Free (black) camera  No Name: Focus Free (black)  20091.501980's good condition worth $2.00 in 2014
No Name: Focus Free (Red) camera  No Name: Focus Free (Red)  20111.001980's good condition worth $2.00 in 2014
No Name: Red (hot shoe) camera  No Name: Red (hot shoe)  20081.001980's good condition worth $2.00 in 2014
North American: Namco camera  North American: Namcoc1939 201516.00This camera is made mostly of Bakelite and produced by the North American Manufacturing Company based in Chicago, Illinois. It has a 50mm Graf lens and about 1/50th of a second shutter with settings of instant and time. The camera uses 127 film and embossed on the inside of the back cover is “USE STANDARD VEST POCKET FILM”. Also embossed inside the back cover is “1 5/8 x 2 ½ 4 x 6 cm” the size of the film frames on 127 film. It also has two red lens round windows in the back for lining up each frame. The camera has two ridged round knobs on the bottom of the body just to supply hard point for the film real inside (no other purpose). A spring release button on the side of the body releases the back cover. The film advance knob is on the top and only turns in one direction and that is to the next frame. The bottom of the camera also has a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount hard point. When the camera was produced is a mystery but the film that was left in the camera was from the early 1950’s so we will assume some time around then. The film also suggest Velox paper for the prints so that was produced from the 1940’s to about 1988. The mentioning of the vest pocket film on the back of the camera suggests the 1940’s but was sold as early as 1912. The dual red windows, where a particular frame number on the film backing paper was advanced to appear first in one, then the other window for perfect frame alignment was a design feature of 1930 like the Zeiss Ikon Kolibri the first camera with this feature. So I am going to say the camera was produced about 1935 to 1950 and no later.The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2015.
Olympus: AF-1 Twin (Infinity Twin) camera  Olympus: AF-1 Twin (Infinity Twin)1988  20163.001990 good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Olympus: AZ-200 SuperZoom (Infinity Zoom 200 / Quanratay Infinity Zoom 222 / IZM200) camera  Olympus: AZ-200 SuperZoom (Infinity Zoom 200 / Quanratay Infinity Zoom 222 / IZM200)1989  20165.001989 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Olympus: AZ-210 SuperZoom (Infinity Zoom 210 / Infinity Zoom 76 / IZM210) camera  Olympus: AZ-210 SuperZoom (Infinity Zoom 210 / Infinity Zoom 76 / IZM210)1991  20155.001991 poor condition worth $3.00 in 2015 (missing battery cover)
Olympus: AZ-330 SuperZoom (Infinity SuperZoom 330 / IZM330) camera  Olympus: AZ-330 SuperZoom (Infinity SuperZoom 330 / IZM330)1990  1992250.001990 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Olympus: AZ-330 SuperZoom (Infinity SuperZoom 330 / IZM330) camera  Olympus: AZ-330 SuperZoom (Infinity SuperZoom 330 / IZM330)1990  201615.00Released in 1990 in Japan, two years after the award winning IZM300, the 330 is a lesser known product: it does appear on Olympus' global site and shows up on the US website (with all but one of the links/images for its page orphaned). This camera is identical to the AZ330 Superzoom released in Europe and the Infinity Super Zoom 330 released in the US. The 330 has a range of in-built features that are usually only found on higher-end SLR cameras (such as double exposure mode); in terms of Olympus' product line, it would sit below the otherwise similarly featured 'L' Series as it is not an SLR. With a 38-105mm zoom lens, the 330 follows on from the 300 with a viewfinder that is coupled to the lens zoom - while it is not an SLR, the viewfinder zooms to represent the lens's view (the 300 was reportedly the first camera to feature this functionality). Perhaps the most notable feature of this camera is the lens cap - it doubles as an IR shutter remote. The camera also has DX film coding ISO 25-3200, automatic film load, automatic rewind, Self-timer, ± 1.5EV exposure compensation (in 1/2 steps), Center-weighted average or spot metering, focusing range from 0.8 m to infinity (at 38 mm), aperture range from F4.5 to F6, auto flash, red-eye reduction plus fill-in, Single shot, continuous drive (at 1.3 frames per second) or double exposure modes, Passive or continuous subject-tracking auto-focus, User-controlled or continuous subject-tracking zoom, LCD display, and IR Remote Control (on lens cap) with 1 or 3 second setting. The price for the IZM330 in 1990 was 62,000 yen (including the case) or $560.00 (US) for the Infinity Super Zoom 330 or 450.00 BP for the AZ330 Superzoom.
Olympus: C-2020 Zoom camera  Olympus: C-2020 Zoom1999  20165.001999 fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016 (2.2MP)
Olympus: C-3000 Zoom camera  Olympus: C-3000 Zoom2000  201410.002002 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (3.34MP)
Olympus: C-5000 Zoom camera  Olympus: C-5000 Zoom2003  201510.002003 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015 (5.0MP)
Olympus: D-370 (C-100) camera  Olympus: D-370 (C-100)2001  20135.002001 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (1.3MP)
Olympus: FE-230 camera  Olympus: FE-2302007  201615.002007 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016 (7.1MP)
Olympus: FE-340 (C-560) camera  Olympus: FE-340 (C-560)2008  201135.002008 Fine condition worth $50.00 in 2014 (8.0MP)
Olympus: Mju II Zoom 115 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 115) camera  Olympus: Mju II Zoom 115 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 115)1999  200610.002000 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Olympus: Mju II Zoom 170 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 170) camera  Olympus: Mju II Zoom 170 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 170)2001  20158.002001 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Olympus: Mju II Zoom 80 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 80) camera  Olympus: Mju II Zoom 80 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 80)1998  20155.001989 good condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Olympus: Mju II Zoom 80 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 80) camera  Olympus: Mju II Zoom 80 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 80)1998  20158.001989 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Olympus: Mju II Zoom 80 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 80) camera  Olympus: Mju II Zoom 80 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 80)1998  200910.001998 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Olympus: Mju II Zoom 80 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 80) Deluxe camera  Olympus: Mju II Zoom 80 (Infinity Stylus Epic Zoom 80) Deluxe1998  20166.001999 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Olympus: Mju III 120 (Stylus 120) camera  Olympus: Mju III 120 (Stylus 120)2003  201010.002000 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Olympus: Mju III 120 (Stylus 120) camera  Olympus: Mju III 120 (Stylus 120)2003  20115.002000 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Olympus: Mju l (Infinity Stylus) camera  Olympus: Mju l (Infinity Stylus)1991  201510.001990 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Olympus: Mju Zoom (Infinity Stylus Zoom) camera  Olympus: Mju Zoom (Infinity Stylus Zoom)c1990s  20115.001993 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Olympus: Mju Zoom 105 (Infinity Stylus Zoom 105) camera  Olympus: Mju Zoom 105 (Infinity Stylus Zoom 105)1995  20135.001995 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Olympus: Mju Zoom 105 Deluxe (Infinity Stylus Zoom 105 DLX) camera  Olympus: Mju Zoom 105 Deluxe (Infinity Stylus Zoom 105 DLX)1995  20152.001995 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Olympus: Mju Zoom 140 Deluxe (Infinity Stylus Zoom 140 DLX) camera  Olympus: Mju Zoom 140 Deluxe (Infinity Stylus Zoom 140 DLX)1999  201015.002000 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Olympus: Mju Zoom 70 Deluxe (Infinity Stylus Zoom 70 QD) camera  Olympus: Mju Zoom 70 Deluxe (Infinity Stylus Zoom 70 QD)1992  201310.001999 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Olympus: Mju Zoom Deluxe (Infinity Stylus Zoom DLX) camera  Olympus: Mju Zoom Deluxe (Infinity Stylus Zoom DLX)c2000s  19955.001987 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Olympus: Newpic Zoom 90 camera  Olympus: Newpic Zoom 901997  20095.002001 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Olympus: Olympus 35 EC camera  Olympus: Olympus 35 EC1969 20177.50The Olympus-35 EC is an electronic controlled 35mm compact camera introduced in 1969. It features a fixed Zuiko 42mm f/2.8 lens comprised of 5 elements in 4 groups. It takes 43.5mm filters. The electronic shutter is a Seiko ESF and is automatically controlled and cocked with the press of the shutter release. It has a shutter speed range of 4 seconds to 1/800 of a second. There is two indicator lights for the camera. There is a yellow light on top of the camera as well as in the viewfinder. This acts as a battery check feature with a half press of the shutter release. It will also briefly light as a slow shutter warning when speeds are 4 seconds to 1/30 of a second. A blue light in the finder will appear when a flash is mounted and required to take proper exposures. The blue light will not emit if there is sufficient light. A shutter lock feature is on the face of the camera to prevent unwanted exposures or meter readings. There is an accessory shoe, on the top plate as well as a ¼” 20 thread tripod socket on the base. Flash is possible with 1/20 of a second flash sync and connects via a PC terminal on the left hand side of the camera. The flash guide number can be set on the lens with the ring closest to the camera body. The exposure meter is based on a CdS cell. The film speed can be set on the top plate of the camera with a range of 25 to 800 ASA. Focusing is done on the lens collar. It uses a zone focus system with a range of 1m to infinity. There are focus stops for 1m, 1.5m, 3m and infinity. They are also represented in the viewfinder by iconography of a person’s face, portrait, and group and mountains. The film transport has an auto resetting counter, uses a manual right thumb wheel for advancing the film, and a rewind crank is on the base of the camera. The exposure system and shutter is powered by 2 mercury PX640 batteries no longer available but replaced by the A640PX alkaline battery. Information from Camera-wiki.org. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and worth $3.00 for display or parts in 2017.
Olympus: Olympus 35 RC camera  Olympus: Olympus 35 RC1970  201610.00The camera’s actual weight is 14.7oz/415g, and it uses an EPX-625 battery (accessed at the bottom of the camera) cell for the metering. The 1970 Olympus 35RC is a great performer. It’s the smallest 35mm rangefinder camera ever made with auto and manual exposure settings. It provides perfect focus and perfect exposure for every shot with its 42mm Olympus f/2.8 E. Zuiko lens. The 35RC is entirely mechanical; even the auto exposure system is electromechanical. The battery moves an exposure needle, and the rest of the camera translates the position of the needle into the correct exposure as powered by your finger pressing the shutter button. In Auto mode, the shutter locks if the light or your settings would lead to a bad exposure. This makes the Olympus 35RC stupid-proof if you leave the lens cap on, since the shutter will lock. The Olympus 35RC uses the Flashmatic system for automatic flash exposure with any manual flash. The camera also has a thumb lever film advance, 10 second timer, fold down rewind crank, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, frame counter top right, and shutter speeds of 15, 30, 60, 125, 250, 500, and B. This camera also has a Vivitar UV-HAZE 43.5mm filter attached. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $40.00 in 2016.
Olympus: Olympus Go camera  Olympus: Olympus Go1996  20105.001990 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Olympus: Olympus iS-1000 (iS-1 / L-1000) camera  Olympus: Olympus iS-1000 (iS-1 / L-1000)1990  199015.001987 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Olympus: Olympus LT-1 camera  Olympus: Olympus LT-11994-1996 201621.00The LT-1 was launched in 1994 and ending in 1996. The LT-1 and LT-1 QD are autofocus cameras with a unique synthetic leather exterior that linked the body with the camera case. Special molding technology combined the synthetic leather with the molded case to create a leather-finish body that fit perfectly into the hand. They were available in black, green, brown, and burgundy. These were a "designer" compact aimed at travelers requiring a good-looking point and shoot with a prime lens and with the lens cover closed, the camera looked more like a wallet. The LT-1 was the first in the Olympus LT (leather tech) series, and was followed in 1996 by a QD version with a Quartz date function. The cameras have a 35mm, f/3.5 three element lens and a built in flash. They also have auto focus, auto Exposure, auto flash with an off button, DX decoding, motor drive for auto film advance plus rewind, self-timer, Mode button, ¼” by 7/8” LCD display, and a handy carry strap. The cameras operate on one lithium 3V CR123 (CR123a, UL-123, or 123) battery. As far as the years produced are concerned, Olympus is not the best company for gaining correct information about any camera or information from the company themselves. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $65.00 in 2016.
Olympus: Olympus OM-G camera  Olympus: Olympus OM-G1982  201621.001972 fine condition worth $45.00 in 2016
Olympus: Olympus Pen EE-EL camera  Olympus: Olympus Pen EE-EL1966-1968 20167.00In 1966 the Pen EE (1961) and the Pen EES (1962) were slightly modified and became the Pen EE (EL) and Pen EES (EL) with a modification of the take-up spool to make film loading easier. EL stands for Easy Loading. You can only recognize them by a small label marked EL stuck on the front, or you can open them and look at the take-up spool. These EL cameras were discontinued two years later in 1968. The camera have a fully automatic exposure system and fixed focusing. It is a true point and shoot camera, and has a 28mm f/3.5 lens. The Pen EE family is easily recognized by the selenium meter window around the lens. The shutter speeds were 1/30 and 1/250 of a second. The shutter speed changed automatically according to light level, thus increasing the appropriate exposure range. A three-zone focus system was used to adjust the focal point. By using the half-frame format, Olympus was able to reduce both the weight and size of the Olympus Pen. It featured a simple rear-winding mechanism, a D-Zuiko lens for superior photographic quality, and an attractive design that also made the camera extremely easy to use. The Pen was a compact mix of innovative ideas that triggered the half-frame camera boom of the 1960s and 1970s. Cumulative sales of Pen Series cameras exceeded 17 million units. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition with a nonworking shutter and worth $5.00 for parts in 2016.
Olympus: Olympus Pen EES camera  Olympus: Olympus Pen EES1962-1968 201715.00The Pen EE S (not to be confused with the Pen EE S2), launched in 1962, is the same half frame model as the EE but with a 30mm f/2.8 lens and a three position focusing ring, made necessary by the wider aperture. The Pen EE family is easily recognized by the selenium meter window around the lens. These were considered amateur models and true point and shoot cameras, with fully automatic exposure and fixed focusing. The shutter settings EE S are 8, 15, 30, 60, 125, 250, and B. The manually set frame counter can count down from 76 to accommodate the half frame exposures. The camera also has an optical view finder, manual fold down film rewind crank handle plus release button, right thumb film advance wheel, ASA settings from 10 to 200, flash-X on the front, manual aperture settings up from 2.8 to 22, shutter button with screw-in plunger accommodation, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and two strap hard points one on each side. Olympus revived the Pen name in 2009 with the digital Pen E-P1 and advertised as the next generation Pen camera. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $35.00 in 2017.
Olympus: Olympus XA camera  Olympus: Olympus XA1979  20162.001979-1985 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Olympus: Olympus XA-2 camera  Olympus: Olympus XA-21980  201410.001980-1986 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 with the A11 flash unit attached
Olympus: Olympus XA-2 camera  Olympus: Olympus XA-21980  20008.001980-1986 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 with the A11 flash unit attached
Olympus: Quickmatic EEM camera  Olympus: Quickmatic EEM1967  200610.001967 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Olympus: Shoot & Go camera  Olympus: Shoot & Go1996  20095.001995 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Olympus: Stylus 300 camera  Olympus: Stylus 3002003  20153.002003 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2015 (3.2MP)
Olympus: Stylus 550WP (mju  550WP) camera  Olympus: Stylus 550WP (mju 550WP)2009  201310.002009 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts in 2014 (10.0MP)
Olympus: SuperZoom 105G (Infinity Zoom 105) camera  Olympus: SuperZoom 105G (Infinity Zoom 105)2002  201015.002002 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Olympus: Superzoom 110 (Infinity SuperZoom 3000 / OZ 110 Zoom) camera  Olympus: Superzoom 110 (Infinity SuperZoom 3000 / OZ 110 Zoom)1992  201410.001999 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Olympus: Superzoom 110 (Infinity SuperZoom 3000 DLX / Promaster Zoom 3000 DXL / OZ 110 Zoom) Quartzdate camera  Olympus: Superzoom 110 (Infinity SuperZoom 3000 DLX / Promaster Zoom 3000 DXL / OZ 110 Zoom) Quartzdate1992  20135.001992 good condition worth $3.00 in 2014
Olympus: Superzoom 700 BF (Infinity Accura Zoom XB 70) camera  Olympus: Superzoom 700 BF (Infinity Accura Zoom XB 70)1997  20125.001998 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Olympus: Superzoom 700 XB (SuperZoom 700XB / SuperZoom 70S / Infinity Accura Zoom XB 700) camera  Olympus: Superzoom 700 XB (SuperZoom 700XB / SuperZoom 70S / Infinity Accura Zoom XB 700)1999  201310.001998 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Olympus: Superzoom 700 XB (SuperZoom 700XB / SuperZoom 70S / Infinity Accura Zoom XB 700) camera  Olympus: Superzoom 700 XB (SuperZoom 700XB / SuperZoom 70S / Infinity Accura Zoom XB 700)1999  20152.001998 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Olympus: Superzoom 800 (Infinity Accura Zoom 80 / OZ 80 Zoom) camera  Olympus: Superzoom 800 (Infinity Accura Zoom 80 / OZ 80 Zoom)1996  201410.001987 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Olympus: Superzoom 800 (Infinity Accura Zoom 80 / OZ 80 Zoom) camera  Olympus: Superzoom 800 (Infinity Accura Zoom 80 / OZ 80 Zoom)1996  20155.001999 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Olympus: Trip 100 camera  Olympus: Trip 1001992-1993  20125.001992 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2014
Olympus: Trip 35 (chrome) camera  Olympus: Trip 35 (chrome)1967-1984  20105.001967-1984 poor condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Olympus: Trip 500 camera  Olympus: Trip 5002002 20176.00The Trip 500 is a fixed focus entry level compact 35mm film camera produced by Olympus in 2002. It is part of the Olympus Trip series that was reintroduced in the 1980's. A similar model and released at the same time is the Trip 505. It is almost the identical, but has a self-timer. The 500 features a 28 mm f/6.7 lens made from 3 elements in 3 groups. This fixed focused lens has a range of 1.0 m to infinity. The shutter has a single speed of 1/100 second and there is an automatic built-in flash with red-eye reduction. It is compatible with DX-coded films with a range of ISO 100 to 400 and film that is not coded is fixed by the camera default at ISO 100. Film is advanced and rewound with a motor drive and the camera is mid-roll rewind capable. The camera is powered by 2x AA batteries with a life of approximately 20 rolls of 24 exposure film. The camera also has a built in lens cover that seconds as an on/off switch, optical viewfinder, flash ready LED, film observation window in the back cover, frame counter on the top of the camera, and a ¼” 20 thread per inch tripod socket. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Olympus: Trip AF 50 camera  Olympus: Trip AF 502002 20174.50One of the last few models in the long-running Trip Series of auto focus point-and-shoot cameras by Olympus, the Trip AF 50 was introduced in the 2002 as a more modern offering for holiday snap shooters who wanted “auto-focus everything” for fuss-free travel photography. Its 28mm wide-angle lens made this Trip model a fun and reliable travel companion for beautiful landscape, group, and party photos. A self-timer was eventually added to this camera, and was subsequently named Trip AF 51. The Trip AF 50 is a 35mm autofocus, lens-shutter camera that uses standard DX-coded film (ISO 100 to 400). The lens is an Olympus 28mm, f5.6, 3 elements in 3 groups and the shutter firers at 1/100 of a second. It also has a reverse Galilean-type viewfinder, built-in flash with Red-eye Reduction lamp (flash is automatically activated under low light conditions), flash ready LED, Quartz Date, focusing range of 2.6ft. (0.8m) to infinity, exposure counter, Auto film load (automatically advances to first frame when back cover is closed), Auto rewind, Mid roll rewind, film view window in the back cover, data back LCD screen (1/4” x ¾”), built in lens cover, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and it is powered by two 1.5V AA alkaline (LR6) batteries. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Olympus: Trip Junior camera  Olympus: Trip Junior1989  20135.001990 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Olympus: Trip MD camera  Olympus: Trip MDc1989  201711.00The Trip AF MD of 1986 is a fully-automatic 35mm compact camera, with motor drive and auto-focus manufactured by Olympus. It was one of a series of cheap models branded with the famous Trip name for holidays, thus the Trip name. The camera has a Zuiko 35mm, f/3.8 lens with a fixed 1/125 of a second shutter speed. The camera also has an pop-up integral Flash, with on/off switch, sliding lens cover that prevents accidental shutter release by locking it, auto film advance, motor rewind, optical viewfinder, flash ready LED to the left of the viewfinder, exposure counter, Cds metering, film view window in the back cover, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and a handy carry strap. The battery compartment is accessed from the bottom and the camera requires two AA batteries for the automatic functionality. The camera pictured here is in fine condition worth $15.00 in 2017.
Olympus: Trip MD3 camera  Olympus: Trip MD31998  20175.00The Olympus Trip MD3 is a 35mm 'point and shoot' compact camera produced by Olympus and launched in 1998. It is a camera intended for holidays like the rest of the series, hence the "Trip" name. It featured a light meter that controlled the camera, automatically changing settings. Because of this, the Trip MD3 was easy to use. It is a fixed-focus lens-shutter camera that uses DX-coded 35 mm film (ISO 100 to 400). The Image size produced is 24 x 36 mm. It also has a Olympus 34 mm F6.9, 3 elements in 3 groups lens, 1/125 of a second shutter, reverse Galilean-type viewfinder, progressive type, automatic reset exposure counter, motor film advance and rewind, built-in flash with Red-Eye-Reduction Lamp, automatic flash activation in low light conditions, and a focus range from 5 feet (1.5m) to infinity. It came in two colors of silver with blue grey decor and black with grey décor. All functions are powered by two1.5 V AA batteries. The camera in this picture is in good condition and worth $8.00 in 2017.
Olympus: Trip XB40 AF camera  Olympus: Trip XB40 AF2000  200810.002000 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Oregon Scientific: DS6618 camera  Oregon Scientific: DS66182001  20152.002001 Poor condition worth $0.25 in 2015
Panasonic: Lumix DMC-FZ18 camera  Panasonic: Lumix DMC-FZ182007  201420.002007 Fine condition worth $100.00 in 2014 (8.3MP)
Panasonic: Lumix DMC-TZ3 camera  Panasonic: Lumix DMC-TZ32007  20135.002007 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (7.2MP)
Pentax: Optio 30 camera  Pentax: Optio 302004  20115.002004 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (3.2MP)
Pentax: Pentax IQ-Zoom 130M camera  Pentax: Pentax IQ-Zoom 130Mc2002  200610.002001 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Pho-tak: Foldex 20 camera  Pho-tak: Foldex 201948-1953  201420.001950-1953 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Pho-tak: Foldex 20 camera  Pho-tak: Foldex 201948-1953  200920.001950-1953 fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Pho-tak: Foldex 30 (6.3) camera  Pho-tak: Foldex 30 (6.3)c1950s  201515.001953-1962 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015 Pho-Tak Corporation, of Chicago, USA, was a manufacturer of simple box cameras. Their name is intertwined with United States Camera, effectively the same company, who produced variations on several Pho-Tak models under different names. The Sears Tower Foldex 20 was one of these cameras. Actually there are four versions of the Foldex. The (United States Camera Company) Rollex 20 is the first of this type and has a small difference in the camera open release button plus does not have a hot shoe. The Sears Tower Foldex 20 and the Pho-Tak Foldex 20 are the same camera with different lens escutcheons with white lettering on black. Later versions of the Pho-Tak Foldex 20 had a plain metal lens escutcheon with black lettering. These cameras were fixed focus, fixed aperture, with a B to 1/50 of a second leaf shutter. The last of these cameras is the Pho-Tak Foldex 30 or Foldex 6.3. This camera has a Steinheil Munchen Cassar 100mm f/6.3 lens and a Vario diaphragm shutter. Although it is called the Foldex 30, nowhere on the camera will you see the number 30 but you will find the 6.3 aperture setting and Foldex does appear on the portrait table support leg. This cameras other differences are that it has a plastic top that encloses the viewfinder, adjustable shutter speeds from B to 1/200 of a second, aperture settings of 6.3 to 22, manual shutter cocking, and the wheel was removed from the shutter release translator. The distinctive characteristic of all these Foldex cameras is that the shutter has to be tripped with a lever that is integrated into the edge of the front door panel. They also can use 120 or 620 film and were produced from 1950-1953 with the Foldex 30 going on till 1962.
Pho-tak: Trailblazer 120 camera  Pho-tak: Trailblazer 120c1950s  201617.001950 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Pho-tak: Traveler 120 camera  Pho-tak: Traveler 120c1950s  201615.001948 good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Photoflex: Photoflex Deluxe 110 camera  Photoflex: Photoflex Deluxe 1101980s  20095.001975 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Barbie Instant Camera camera  Polaroid: Barbie Instant Camerac1999 201716.00Polaroid 600 Barbie Edition Instant Camera is one of the most favorite Polaroid camera color combinations. The Barbie Limited Edition flip top with flash takes 600 film, has a 116mm f/11 single element fixed focus lens, built-in close-up lens, built in flash (powered by film cartridge), shutter speed range of 1/4 to 1/200 of a second, optical viewfinder, and a handy carry strap. All features are also powered by film cartridge and this includes the picture extruding drive. The 600 series of Polaroid is the perfect camera for beginners. The Polaroid 600 camera is a simple point-and-shoot that is fun, quick and easy-to-use. The Barbie instant camera was introduced in 1999 and though Polaroid sold the Company to PLR IP Holdings, LLC you can still buy the 600 film now supplied by the Company Impossible Project founded in 2008 just after Polaroid announced it was stopping all instant film production. Impossible Project bought the production machinery from Polaroid for $3.1 million dollars and leased a building, called Building Noord, which was formerly part of the Polaroid plant in Enscheda, Netherlands. The rest still writes history. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $40.00 in 2017.
Polaroid: Big Shot camera  Polaroid: Big Shot1971-1973  201210.001971-1973 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Button camera  Polaroid: Buttonc1981  201512.001981 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Polaroid: Captiva camera  Polaroid: Captiva1993-1997  201315.001993 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Captiva camera  Polaroid: Captiva1993-1997  200510.001993 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Captiva camera  Polaroid: Captiva1993-1997  200210.001993 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Captiva camera  Polaroid: Captiva1993-1997  199715.001993 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Captiva camera  Polaroid: Captiva1993-1997  2015151993 fine condition worth $30.00 with a clip-on close-up lens and flash filter in 2015
Polaroid: Captiva camera  Polaroid: Captiva1993-1997  20160.001993 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Polaroid: Colorpack (The) camera  Polaroid: Colorpack (The)1973-1975  201315.001973-1975 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Colorpack 5 camera  Polaroid: Colorpack 51973-1975  199410.001973-1975 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Colorpack II camera  Polaroid: Colorpack II1969-1972 201115.001969 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Colorpack II camera  Polaroid: Colorpack II1969-1972 201510.001969 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Colorpack II camera  Polaroid: Colorpack II1969-1972 20178.00Initially produced in 1969, the Colorpack 2 was the first rigid, plastic bodied, color film capable Polaroid to retail at consumer range prices, and set a precedent for many similar models that followed. The Colorpack is designed for Peel-apart 100-Series Land Pack Films (discontinued) or Fujifilm FP-100C (still manufactured). Focusing is carried out by turning the distance-marked front lens element; unlike the original Polaroid 100-400 series packfilm cameras, this series features no rangefinder mechanism. As an improvement over the original folding series however, there is no need to cock the shutter after each exposure. The Colorpack 2 also takes generic 'blue dot' flashcubes, with a wind-up hot shoe and small plastic diffuser set to one side of the lens. Early versions of this model featured 114mm, f/9.2 three-element coated glass lens but later uncoated plastic lens was used. The camera pictured above is in Good condition and worth $12.00 to $15.00 in 2017.
Polaroid: Cool Cam camera  Polaroid: Cool Camc1988-1999  201110.001988 good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Cool Cam camera  Polaroid: Cool Camc1988-1999  20168.00In 1988, Polaroid released its Cool Cam for $69.00, which was essentially the Sun 600 with flashy colors and branded with the “Cool Cam” moniker. It came in several color combinations, including Red & Black, Yellow & Pink, and the pictured Pink & Grey plus more. The Cool Cam also came with a matching carrying case and a sheet of word bubble stickers that could be adhered to your photos to add some COOLNESS but this did not! The Cool Cam features a single-element 116mm f/11 plastic lens, fixed focus 4 ft to infinity, electronic shutter, programmed auto-exposure system and a built-in electronic flash, Polaroid's Light Management System (the darken/lighten exposure correction slider), automatic electronic shutter w speed between 1/4th-1/200th second, and was made in United Kingdom. The weight is 1 lb 5 oz and the dimensions are 3.5”x 4.5”x 6” when folded. Starting 1997 the Cool Cam whet through a design change with more rounded body, and again in 2000 even more rounded. The camera was discontinued in 1999. The camera pictured above is in Fine condition and worth $35.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: i-zone camera  Polaroid: i-zone1998-2001  20055.001999-2003 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Polaroid: i-zone camera  Polaroid: i-zone1998-2001  20125.001999-2003 Good condition worth $7.00 in 2014
Polaroid: i-zone camera  Polaroid: i-zone1998-2001  20095.001999-2003 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Polaroid: i-zone camera  Polaroid: i-zone1998-2001  20085.001999-2003 Good condition worth $7.00 in 2014
Polaroid: i-zone camera  Polaroid: i-zone1998-2001  20168.00The Polaroid I-Zone was a type of instant film camera manufactured by the Polaroid Corporation from 1998 to 2001. This camera took pictures 1 ½ " x 1”, which came on a pull-out strip of paper. The strip was decorated and could later be cut to the size of the photo when the image was finished developing. Special film that had a sticky back for mounting the prints was also available. The camera was mostly marketed toward children with its simple functionality, low-cost, and oblong shape. The sales pitch went like the following. “The I-Zone Pocket Camera is the ultra-portable Polaroid camera that takes instant mini-photos that can be stuck anywhere. Collect, trade, and wear these little photos! Use them as calling cards! Sign letters with them! Stick them on books, lockers, or even your friends! Never before has a camera been so much fun.” In an attempt to sell to children several models were developed with cartoon caricatures modeled in three dimensions as part of the camera like the Bugs Bunny, Tweety Bird, and others. To market to older children they labeled some like American Girl, Hello Kitty complete with icon, Barbie complete with make-up mirror, and marketing used an array of colors plus designs, they even had one combo digital plus instant picture camera. Another design incorporated an FM radio that came with a set of ear plug type earphones. The film got into the act also with many colorful designs incorporated in the paper surrounding the produced picture. All these cameras worked with a shutter mounted behind the lens that then reflected of a mirror to the film below. One major marketing point for the camera was its ease of use: the camera had only three aperture settings, selected by a lever that pointed to a picture representing when each setting would be appropriate, be it indoors, outdoors on a sunny day, or outdoors on a cloudy day. After taking a photo, the lever would automatically revert to the off position to save power. Film for this camera was discontinued by Polaroid in 2006 but it is still available from Fujifilm and called Instax Mini film. The I-Zone camera has a built in automatic flash unit that works when needed in all three aperture settings. The camera operates on two AA batteries kept in a compartment behind the flash. The camera was not popular at any time of its production and the picture it takes are of poor quality. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: i-zone camera  Polaroid: i-zone1998-2001  20168.00The Polaroid i-Zone was a type of instant film camera manufactured by the Polaroid Corporation from 1998 to 2001. This camera took pictures 1 ½ " x 1”, which came on a pull-out strip of paper. The strip was decorated and could later be cut to the size of the photo when the image was finished developing. Special film that had a sticky back for mounting the prints was also available. The camera was mostly marketed toward children with its simple functionality, low-cost, and oblong shape. The sales pitch went like the following. “The I-Zone Pocket Camera is the ultra-portable Polaroid camera that takes instant mini-photos that can be stuck anywhere. Collect, trade, and wear these little photos! Use them as calling cards! Sign letters with them! Stick them on books, lockers, or even your friends! Never before has a camera been so much fun.” In an attempt to sell to children several models were developed with cartoon caricatures modeled in three dimensions as part of the camera like the Bugs Bunny, Tweety Bird, and others. To market to older children they labeled some like American Girl, Hello Kitty complete with icon, Barbie complete with make-up mirror, and marketing used an array of colors plus designs, they even had one combo digital plus instant picture camera. Another design incorporated an FM radio that came with a set of ear plug type earphones. The film got into the act also with many colorful designs incorporated in the paper surrounding the produced picture. All these cameras worked with a shutter mounted behind the lens that then reflected of a mirror to the film below. One major marketing point for the camera was its ease of use: the camera had only three aperture settings, selected by a lever that pointed to a picture representing when each setting would be appropriate, be it indoors, outdoors on a sunny day, or outdoors on a cloudy day. After taking a photo, the lever would automatically revert to the off position to save power. Film for this camera was discontinued by Polaroid in 2006 but it is still available from Fujifilm and called Instax Mini film. The Barbie i-Zone has a makeup mirror complete with a pink cover but the mirror is made of metal and more like a funhouse mirror with a lot of distortion. The i-Zone camera has a built in automatic flash unit that works when needed in all three aperture settings. The camera operates on two AA batteries kept in a compartment behind the flash. The camera was not popular at any time of its production and the picture it takes are of poor quality. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: i-zone (Bugs Bunny) camera  Polaroid: i-zone (Bugs Bunny)  201612.00The Polaroid i-Zone was a type of instant film camera manufactured by the Polaroid Corporation from 1998 to 2001. This camera took pictures 1 ½ " x 1”, which came on a pull-out strip of paper. The strip was decorated and could later be cut to the size of the photo when the image was finished developing. Special film that had a sticky back for mounting the prints was also available. The camera was mostly marketed toward children with its simple functionality, low-cost, and oblong shape. The sales pitch went like the following. “The I-Zone Pocket Camera is the ultra-portable Polaroid camera that takes instant mini-photos that can be stuck anywhere. Collect, trade, and wear these little photos! Use them as calling cards! Sign letters with them! Stick them on books, lockers, or even your friends! Never before has a camera been so much fun.” In an attempt to sell to children several models were developed with cartoon caricatures modeled in three dimensions as part of the camera like the Bugs Bunny, Tweety Bird, and others. To market to older children they labeled some like American Girl, Hello Kitty complete with icon, Barbie complete with make-up mirror, and marketing used an array of colors plus designs, they even had one combo digital plus instant picture camera. Another design incorporated an FM radio that came with a set of ear plug type earphones. The film got into the act also with many colorful designs incorporated in the paper surrounding the produced picture. All these cameras worked with a shutter mounted behind the lens that then reflected of a mirror to the film below. One major marketing point for the camera was its ease of use: the camera had only three aperture settings, selected by a lever that pointed to a picture representing when each setting would be appropriate, be it indoors, outdoors on a sunny day, or outdoors on a cloudy day. After taking a photo, the lever would automatically revert to the off position to save power. Film for this camera was discontinued by Polaroid in 2006 but it is still available from Fujifilm and called Instax Mini film. The Barbie i-Zone has a makeup mirror complete with a pink cover but the mirror is made of metal and more like a funhouse mirror with a lot of distortion. The i-Zone camera has a built in automatic flash unit that works when needed in all three aperture settings. The camera operates on two AA batteries kept in a compartment behind the flash. The camera was not popular at any time of its production and the picture it takes are of poor quality. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: i-zone (Hello Kitty) camera  Polaroid: i-zone (Hello Kitty)  201615.00The Polaroid i-Zone was a type of instant film camera manufactured by the Polaroid Corporation from 1998 to 2001. This camera took pictures 1 ½ " x 1”, which came on a pull-out strip of paper. The strip was decorated and could later be cut to the size of the photo when the image was finished developing. Special film that had a sticky back for mounting the prints was also available. The camera was mostly marketed toward children with its simple functionality, low-cost, and oblong shape. The sales pitch went like the following. “The I-Zone Pocket Camera is the ultra-portable Polaroid camera that takes instant mini-photos that can be stuck anywhere. Collect, trade, and wear these little photos! Use them as calling cards! Sign letters with them! Stick them on books, lockers, or even your friends! Never before has a camera been so much fun.” In an attempt to sell to children several models were developed with cartoon caricatures modeled in three dimensions as part of the camera like the Bugs Bunny, Tweety Bird, and others. To market to older children they labeled some like American Girl, Hello Kitty complete with icon, Barbie complete with make-up mirror, and marketing used an array of colors plus designs, they even had one combo digital plus instant picture camera. Another design incorporated an FM radio that came with a set of ear plug type earphones. The film got into the act also with many colorful designs incorporated in the paper surrounding the produced picture. All these cameras worked with a shutter mounted behind the lens that then reflected of a mirror to the film below. One major marketing point for the camera was its ease of use: the camera had only three aperture settings, selected by a lever that pointed to a picture representing when each setting would be appropriate, be it indoors, outdoors on a sunny day, or outdoors on a cloudy day. After taking a photo, the lever would automatically revert to the off position to save power. Film for this camera was discontinued by Polaroid in 2006 but it is still available from Fujifilm and called Instax Mini film. The Barbie i-Zone has a makeup mirror complete with a pink cover but the mirror is made of metal and more like a funhouse mirror with a lot of distortion. The i-Zone camera has a built in automatic flash unit that works when needed in all three aperture settings. The camera operates on two AA batteries kept in a compartment behind the flash. The camera was not popular at any time of its production and the picture it takes are of poor quality. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: i-zone (Hello Kitty) camera  Polaroid: i-zone (Hello Kitty)  201616.00The Polaroid i-Zone was a type of instant film camera manufactured by the Polaroid Corporation from 1998 to 2001. This camera took pictures 1 ½ " x 1”, which came on a pull-out strip of paper. The strip was decorated and could later be cut to the size of the photo when the image was finished developing. Special film that had a sticky back for mounting the prints was also available. The camera was mostly marketed toward children with its simple functionality, low-cost, and oblong shape. The sales pitch went like the following. “The I-Zone Pocket Camera is the ultra-portable Polaroid camera that takes instant mini-photos that can be stuck anywhere. Collect, trade, and wear these little photos! Use them as calling cards! Sign letters with them! Stick them on books, lockers, or even your friends! Never before has a camera been so much fun.” In an attempt to sell to children several models were developed with cartoon caricatures modeled in three dimensions as part of the camera like the Bugs Bunny, Tweety Bird, and others. To market to older children they labeled some like American Girl, Hello Kitty complete with icon, Barbie complete with make-up mirror, and marketing used an array of colors plus designs, they even had one combo digital plus instant picture camera. Another design incorporated an FM radio that came with a set of ear plug type earphones. The film got into the act also with many colorful designs incorporated in the paper surrounding the produced picture. All these cameras worked with a shutter mounted behind the lens that then reflected of a mirror to the film below. One major marketing point for the camera was its ease of use: the camera had only three aperture settings, selected by a lever that pointed to a picture representing when each setting would be appropriate, be it indoors, outdoors on a sunny day, or outdoors on a cloudy day. After taking a photo, the lever would automatically revert to the off position to save power. Film for this camera was discontinued by Polaroid in 2006 but it is still available from Fujifilm and called Instax Mini film. The Barbie i-Zone has a makeup mirror complete with a pink cover but the mirror is made of metal and more like a funhouse mirror with a lot of distortion. The i-Zone camera has a built in automatic flash unit that works when needed in all three aperture settings. The camera operates on two AA batteries kept in a compartment behind the flash. The camera was not popular at any time of its production and the picture it takes are of poor quality. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: i-zone (transparent) camera  Polaroid: i-zone (transparent)1998-2001  20095.001999-2003 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Polaroid: i-zone (Tweety Bird) camera  Polaroid: i-zone (Tweety Bird)  20165.00The Polaroid I-Zone was a type of instant film camera manufactured by the Polaroid Corporation from 1998 to 2001. This camera took pictures 1 ½ " x 1”, which came on a pull-out strip of paper. The strip was decorated and could later be cut to the size of the photo when the image was finished developing. Special film that had a sticky back for mounting the prints was also available. The camera was mostly marketed toward children with its simple functionality, low-cost, and oblong shape. The sales pitch went like the following. “The I-Zone Pocket Camera is the ultra-portable Polaroid camera that takes instant mini-photos that can be stuck anywhere. Collect, trade, and wear these little photos! Use them as calling cards! Sign letters with them! Stick them on books, lockers, or even your friends! Never before has a camera been so much fun.” In an attempt to sell to children several models were developed with cartoon caricatures modeled in three dimensions as part of the camera like the Bugs Bunny, Tweety Bird, and others. To market to older children they labeled some like American Girl, Hello Kitty complete with icon, Barbie complete with make-up mirror, and marketing used an array of colors plus designs, they even had one combo digital plus instant picture camera. Another design incorporated an FM radio that came with a set of ear plug type earphones. The film got into the act also with many colorful designs incorporated in the paper surrounding the produced picture. All these cameras worked with a shutter mounted behind the lens that then reflected of a mirror to the film below. One major marketing point for the camera was its ease of use: the camera had only three aperture settings, selected by a lever that pointed to a picture representing when each setting would be appropriate, be it indoors, outdoors on a sunny day, or outdoors on a cloudy day. After taking a photo, the lever would automatically revert to the off position to save power. Film for this camera was discontinued by Polaroid in 2006 but it is still available from Fujifilm and called Instax Mini film. The Barbie i-Zone has a makeup mirror complete with a pink cover but the mirror is made of metal and more like a funhouse mirror with a lot of distortion. The i-Zone camera has a built in automatic flash unit that works when needed in all three aperture settings. The camera operates on two AA batteries kept in a compartment behind the flash. The camera was not popular at any time of its production and the picture it takes are of poor quality. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: Image 1200 camera  Polaroid: Image 12001986  201515.001986 Fine condition worth $70.00 in 2015
Polaroid: Impulse camera  Polaroid: Impulse1988  201315.001988 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Impulse camera  Polaroid: Impulse1988  201110.001988 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Impulse camera  Polaroid: Impulse1988  199815.001988 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Impulse camera  Polaroid: Impulse1988  200610.001988 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Impulse AF camera  Polaroid: Impulse AF1988-1992  201210.001988 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Impulse AF camera  Polaroid: Impulse AF1988-1992  20155.001988 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Impulse AF camera  Polaroid: Impulse AF1988-1992  20155.001988 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Polaroid: Impulse SE camera  Polaroid: Impulse SE1988-1992  200610.001988 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: izone 300 camera  Polaroid: izone 3002004  20121.002004 poor condition worth 3.00 in 2014 (3.2MP)
Polaroid: Job Pro 2 camera  Polaroid: Job Pro 21999  20160.002000 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2016
Polaroid: Minute Maker camera  Polaroid: Minute Makerc1977  20165.001977 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Polaroid: Minute Maker Plus camera  Polaroid: Minute Maker Plus1977-1978  200010.001977-1978 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One camera  Polaroid: One2004  201320.002003 fine condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One camera  Polaroid: One2004  201510.002003 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Polaroid: One camera  Polaroid: One2004  20165.00In early 2003 Polaroid released one last line of instant cameras, including the One that used Polaroid 600 film. Though similar in function and capabilities to most Polaroid cameras, these cameras are sleeker in design, opening and closing in a clamshell fashion. The One features a 100mm lens with minimum focus distance of 3 feet and a built-in electronic flash. Some models in this line omitted exposure control while others had the addition of a self-timer. This particular model has both and also has a small ½” x ½” LCD screen in the back for counting down pictures left. The camera also has a flash on button, flash ready LED by the shutter button, pop-up viewfinder, female ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and a handy built in carry strap. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $25.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: One 600 camera  Polaroid: One 6002004  200820.002004 Fine condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Film camera  Polaroid: One Film1975  20121.001975 poor condition worth $2.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Film camera  Polaroid: One Film1975  20172.00This camera was an attempt in 1975 by Polaroid to have success in the point and shoot 35mm camera and film market. They may have succeeded with the lawsuit against Kodak with their instant cameras and film but 35mm cameras and film was a bust. The camera is powered by two AA batteries and is switched by the lens cover. Unfortunately the camera pictured above has a minor error because the flash unit charges even when the lens cover is closed. Other than that it works fine in all aspects. The camera was designed as a fully automatic point and shoot. You would have to start the film on the take-up wheel then the camera does the rest. It has auto film advance, auto flash, auto focus, auto exposure, and a flash ready LED indicator light. This camera is in good condition and worth $3.00 in 2017.
Polaroid: One Step camera  Polaroid: One Step1993  201215.001982 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step camera  Polaroid: One Step1993  201110.001982 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step camera  Polaroid: One Step1993  200210.001982 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step camera  Polaroid: One Step1993  199715.001982 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step camera  Polaroid: One Step1993  199020.001982 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step AF camera  Polaroid: One Step AF1993  201115.001983 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step AF camera  Polaroid: One Step AF1993  200315.001983 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step BC camera  Polaroid: One Step BC1976  19900.001977 poor condition worth $2.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step Closeup camera  Polaroid: One Step Closeup1993  200620.001990 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Polaroid: One Step Closeup camera  Polaroid: One Step Closeup1993  201510.001990 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Polaroid: One Step Closeup camera  Polaroid: One Step Closeup1993  201610.00This camera was manufactured in 1983 to late 1990’s by the Polaroid Corporation of Cambridge, Massachusetts. The camera was still available for purchase in 2006, even though Polaroid folded. It is an upgraded version of the longstanding OneStep, the OneStep Closeup has the “normal” focus of 4ft to infinity with a 116mm f/11, Single element plastic lens and a close-up lens that allows the user to focus between 2ft and 4ft. In closeup mode, a viewfinder framer slides in front of the viewfinder along with the secondary lens for the main lens. This framer corrects for parallax. The camera has the clamshell flash and uses the updated “600” film that is being produced to this day by The “Imposable Project” company. This camera is embossed as made in the United Kingdom on the very back. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $25.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: One Step Closeup camera  Polaroid: One Step Closeup1993  20161.001990 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Polaroid: One Step Express camera  Polaroid: One Step Express1998  201415.001997 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step Express camera  Polaroid: One Step Express1998  199140.001997 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step Express camera  Polaroid: One Step Express1998  20155.001997 Fine condition worth $30.00 in 2015
Polaroid: One Step Flash (1982) camera  Polaroid: One Step Flash (1982)1982  199120.001982 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step Flash (1982) camera  Polaroid: One Step Flash (1982)1982  200815.001982 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step Flash (1982) camera  Polaroid: One Step Flash (1982)1982  201120.001982 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step Plus camera  Polaroid: One Step Plusc1976-1980  201415.001982 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step SE camera  Polaroid: One Step SE1993  199715.001987 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: One Step Special camera  Polaroid: One Step Specialc1977  201610.00This camera was introduced in the Sears catalog in 1977. The solid body One Step was also introduced by Polaroid at that time. The One-Step is in the same family as the SX-70 using SX-70 film. It was much less expensive and had many fewer features, however. It has a solid, instead of folding, body, with a simple direct viewfinder. According to The Land List, it has a single element 103mm f14.6 plastic, fixed focus, lens. Also according to that site, it has an electronic shutter with programmed auto exposure. A flash bar with ten flashes can be inserted on the top. The suggested retail price was $39.95, about $200 in 2016 dollars. The film pack includes the battery and is needed to test the shutter. This camera tested well. I can find no difference between the regular One Step and the One Step Sears Special other than “Sears Special” printed in small red letters over the film exit slot. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: One Step Talking camera  Polaroid: One Step Talking1995  201610.00Designed for Polaroid's 600-series integral film, the 1995 OneStep Talking Camera has a unique gimmick. Along with a couple of pre-recorded messages, the camera can also be used to record speech (or music) which is played via a speaker just before firing of the shutter. It works in a similar way to a digital answering machine. The sound effects can be switched off completely if desired. The pre-recorded messages apparently vary according to the territory the camera was marketed in, and include American and Spanish versions. The UK version has "Smile, you're on Polaroid!" and "Don't say Cheddar, say CHEESE!" said in a comedy accent. The American version said “Smile and say hot bola binga bola etc”, one was just laughter for 3 seconds, and another was a real cow mooing a few times. When the loudspeaker is turned off, this camera functions in much the same way as a standard OneStep 600, with fixed focus and automatic flash. A sliding close-up lens is included, but it tends to make images even softer than usual. Although marketed as a fun camera for taking close-up snapshots at parties and family reunions, picture quality is better when focusing over longer distances out of doors in bright conditions. Other Talking cameras released around the word were the Polaroid 636 Talking, Polaroid 636 Polatalk, and the Polaroid OneStep Talking QPS. All of these cameras were produced from 1995 to 1997. The novelty wore off quickly and truly had no real purpose other than saying “smile, I’m taking a picture now”. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: One Step Time-Zero camera  Polaroid: One Step Time-Zeroc1980s  199315.001981 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: PhotoMax Fun camera  Polaroid: PhotoMax Fun1999  20166.00The camera needs four AA batteries to operate this digital 0.3 MP offering. Originally it came with a camera to computer serial cable, the batteries, handy carry strap, Instruction booklet, and a SE 2.1 Image Software CD-ROM disc. The camera also has a built in flash, AC adapter port, serial connect port, self-timer indicator, self-timer button, flash settings button, optical viewfinder, on/off switch, LCD display, scroll up button, scroll down button, delete button, menu on/off button, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount on the bottom of the camera. Other features with the LCD screen are a picture counter, memory full icon, flash setting icon, and a resolution setting icon. The minimum distance to take a picture is 3 feet and infinity is the maximum. To save power the camera automatically shuts down after 30 seconds of inactivity and this is call sleep mode. In sleep mode, the camera LCD display turns off and the power indicator light blinks every five seconds. Press the shutter button while the camera is in sleep mode to turn on the camera. The LCD display turns on and the power indicator light displays green again. If you don’t use your digital camera after approximately three minutes of sleep mode, all power is shut off. The flash has three settings, flash off, auto flash, and force flash with all three having intuitive icons. The camera was introduced by Polaroid in 1999 and made in China. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: PhotoMax Fun 320 camera  Polaroid: PhotoMax Fun 3201999  20168.00The camera needs one 9 volt battery to operate this digital 0.1 MP (320 x 240 pixel) offering. Originally it came with a camera to computer serial cable, the battery, handy carry strap, Instruction booklet, and a SE 2.1 Image Software CD-ROM disc. The camera also has an 500 KB integrated memory, AC adapter port, serial connect port, self-timer indicator, self-timer button, flash settings button, optical viewfinder, on/off switch, LCD display, scroll up button, scroll down button, delete button, menu on/off button, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount on the bottom of the camera. Other features with the LCD screen are a picture counter, memory full icon, flash setting icon, and a resolution setting icon. The minimum distance to take a picture is 3 feet and infinity is the maximum. To save power the camera automatically shuts down after 30 seconds of inactivity and this is call sleep mode. In sleep mode, the camera LCD display turns off and the power indicator light blinks every five seconds. Press the shutter button while the camera is in sleep mode to turn on the camera. The LCD display turns on and the power indicator light displays green again. If you don’t use your digital camera after approximately three minutes of sleep mode, all power is shut off. The camera was introduced by Polaroid in 1999 and made in China. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: Polaroid 100 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 1001963-1966  201215.001963-1966 Good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 100 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 1001963-1966  199620.001963-1966 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 104 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 1041965-1967  20150.001965-1967 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2015
Polaroid: Polaroid 104 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 1041965-1967  20163.001965-1967 good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Polaroid: Polaroid 150 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 1501957-1960  200410.001957-1960 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 200 BF camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 200 BFc1990s  20165.001999 poor condition worth $1.00 in 2016 (battery compartment)
Polaroid: Polaroid 210 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 2101967-1969  201415.001967 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 220 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 2201967-1969  200615.001968-1970 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 220 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 2201967-1969  199815.001968-1970 Fine condition worth $20.00 with flash unit in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 250 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 2501967-1969  200410.001967-1969 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 250 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 2501967-1969  199720.001967-1969 fine condition worth $30.00 with flash unit in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 320 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 3201969-1971  201320.001969-1971 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 320 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 3201969-1971  200010.001969-1971 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 320 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 3201969-1971  201510.001969-1971 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 335 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 3351969-1971  201610.00The Polaroid Land 335 was a basic range finder model in the 300 series and is a great place to start using type 100 film as it is one of the only Polaroid Compatible films still in production by Fujifilm and called Fuji FP-100c, FP-100b or FP-3000b. Apart from the fact these cameras use two 3V 532 replacement batteries like the A24PX/532, A544, or the A24PX. A lot of internet guides tell you to go to “Maplin’s”, and buy a cheap battery holder for four AAA batteries and with some remodeling Bob your Uncle, or tape two CR2 batteries to the battery terminals. The camera's shutter speed is set automatically by "electronic eye", an aperture priority program and a "lighter-darker" setting dial between 10 seconds and 1/1200 of a second. Its lens is a 3 element glass lens (114mm f8.8). You have to load the shutter manually then slide the lens deck adjuster till the rangefinder image is clear. You could also purchase a clip-on flash made for this series. The camera was produced from 1969 to 1971 and is one of the few with an electronic timer for timing film development up to 120 seconds. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: Polaroid 345af camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 345af  20175.00This is a point and shoot 35mm camera that was made in China for the Polaroid Company. The camera was introduced in 2004 and its features plus price were competitive for the time. It weighs 6.7oz and has auto focus plus a 30mm f/7 3 groups, 3 elements lens. This camera also has a motorized film advance, auto rewind, red-eye reduction, built in lens cover (also on and off button), power saving function, 1/80 of a second to 1/100 of a second shutter, built in flash (recycles in about 7 seconds), flash ready indicator, frame counter viewed on the top of the camera, film ID window on the back cover, and a handy carry strap. The motor and flash run on two AAA Alkaline batteries that are loaded in the bottom of the camera and it warns not to use Ni-Cd’s. The flash ready indicator is located next to the viewfinder and can be seen will looking through the viewfinder. The camera is designed to use DX-coded ISO100, ISO200 or ISO400 fi lm. When the fi lm is loaded, the camera automatically sets the correct fi lm speed by reading the black-and-silver pattern on the fi lm cassettes. This camera also comes with the original Instruction Manual in English and Espanola. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2017.
Polaroid: Polaroid 3600AF camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 3600AFc1990s  201610.00This 1990 35mm Polaroid has all the bells and whistles of a camera in this era. The camera has a 27mm f4.5 three element plastic lens, Built in flash, active automatic focusing system with focus lock flash, flash ready LED by the viewfinder, red eye reduction, easy film loading, auto film advance, auto rewind, rewind mid roll button, LCD data back panel, auto focus, electronic shutter with auto shutter speeds, film view window in the back cover, ¼” by ¾” LCD menu screen on top, built in lens cover acting as an on/off switch, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount on the bottom, two AA battery compartment, mode plus shutter button on top, and a handy carry strap. The camera has a 12 second timer access with the mode button and also a night mode symbolized by a ¼ moon and star icon in the mode LCD. You also can turn off the flash, turn on red eye reduction, turn off auto, obtain the frame count, and look at the battery strength. The camera pictured here is in poor condition with a bad flash unit. For this reason it is worth $2.00 for parts in 2016.
Polaroid: Polaroid 420 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 4201971  201115.001971-1977 Poor condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 430 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 4301971-1977  200415.001971-1977 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 450 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 4501971-1974  200022.001971-1974 Good condition worth $60.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 470 AF camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 470 AFc2002  20155.002002 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Polaroid: Polaroid 600   Polaroid: Polaroid 600 "Business Edition"c1997-1999  199910.001992-2000 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 600 AF camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 600 AFc2000s  20165.002002 Fine condition worth $45.00 in 2016
Polaroid: Polaroid 660 AF camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 660 AF1986  201415.001981 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 660 AF camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 660 AF1986  200810.001981 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 7100 FF camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 7100 FF2000  200910.002005 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 80 (Highlander) camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 80 (Highlander)1954-1957  201320.001954-1957 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 80 (Highlander) camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 80 (Highlander)1954-1957  201210.001954-1957 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 80 (Highlander) camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 80 (Highlander)1954-1957  200415.001954-1957 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 800 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 8001957-1962  200525.001957-1962 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 80A (Highlander) camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 80A (Highlander)1957-1959  201025.001957 fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 900 Electric Eye camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 900 Electric Eye1960-1963  199820.001960-1963 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid 95 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid 951948-1953  201315.001948 good condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid A500 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid A5002006  201410.002010 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (5.0MP)
Polaroid: Polaroid AF Dateback camera  Polaroid: Polaroid AF Datebackc1990s  20035.001985 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid CU-5 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid CU-51964  199120.001964-1978 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid i533 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid i5332007  20122.002004 poor condition worth $2.00 in 2014 (5.0MP)
Polaroid: Polaroid J 33 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid J 331961-1963  201315.001961-1963 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid J 66 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid J 661961-1963  201510.001961-1963 Good condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Polaroid: Polaroid Joy Cam camera  Polaroid: Polaroid Joy Cam1999  20145.001999 Fine condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid Joy Cam camera  Polaroid: Polaroid Joy Cam1999  20025.001999 Fine condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid Joy Cam camera  Polaroid: Polaroid Joy Cam1999  20025.001999 Fine condition worth $8.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Polaroid PDC 2300Z camera  Polaroid: Polaroid PDC 2300Z2003  200920.001996 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (2.3MP)
Polaroid: Polaroid PDC 700 camera  Polaroid: Polaroid PDC 7001999  200020.001991 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (0.8MP)
Polaroid: Polaroid Zip camera  Polaroid: Polaroid Zip1974-1977  200310.001975-1978 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Power Zoom PZ1710 camera  Polaroid: Power Zoom PZ17102004  20177.50January 5, 2004—Concord Camera Corp. (“Concord”), announced today the Polaroid PZ1710 35mm zoom camera. This new power zoom camera combines one-touch wide-angle & telephoto 35-57mm zoom, auto and fill-in flash, motorized film load/advance/rewind and red-eye reduction at an affordable suggested retail price of only $19.99. The multiple flash modes for auto and fill-in flash enable the user to take pictures in any lighting condition with excellent photo results. The auto-flash works in low light conditions allowing for worry-free picture taking. To reduce the red-eye effect the camera is equipped with an automatic red-eye reduction device, which lights up and shines in the subject’s eyes to contract the pupils and create red-eye free photos. This 35mm film camera is made in China and uses two AA batteries to power all its features. The camera also has an optical viewfinder, Film view window in the back cover, flash ready LED, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and a handy carry strap.
Polaroid: Pronto camera  Polaroid: Pronto1976-1977  20163.001976 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Polaroid: Pronto (non-folding) camera  Polaroid: Pronto (non-folding)c1977  201115.001977 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Pronto RF SE camera  Polaroid: Pronto RF SEc1977  201420.001977 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Pronto RF SE camera  Polaroid: Pronto RF SEc1977  20168.001977 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: ProPack camera  Polaroid: ProPack1993  199320.001977 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Spectra camera  Polaroid: Spectra1998-c2000s  201220.001990 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Spectra 1200 FF camera  Polaroid: Spectra 1200 FF2001  201515.002001 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Polaroid: Spectra 2 camera  Polaroid: Spectra 21997  199715.001990 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Spectra 2 camera  Polaroid: Spectra 21997  1997?1990 Fine condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Spectra AF camera  Polaroid: Spectra AF1997  201025.001990 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Spectra AF camera  Polaroid: Spectra AF1997  201215.001990 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Spectra AF camera  Polaroid: Spectra AF1997  20155.001990 Fine condition worth $40.00 with original box in 2015
Polaroid: Spirit 600 camera  Polaroid: Spirit 600c1988  199215.001982 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Square Shooter camera  Polaroid: Square Shooter1971-1972  200815.001971-1972 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Square Shooter 2 camera  Polaroid: Square Shooter 21972-1975  201215.001971-1972 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: SUN 600 LMS camera  Polaroid: SUN 600 LMS1982-1986  200115.001980 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Polaroid: SUN 600 LMS camera  Polaroid: SUN 600 LMS1982-1986  199720.001980 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: SUN 600 LMS camera  Polaroid: SUN 600 LMS1982-1986  20161.001980 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Polaroid: SUN 600 SE camera  Polaroid: SUN 600 SE1982-1986  201610.001982 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Polaroid: Super Shooter Plus camera  Polaroid: Super Shooter Plus1975-1977  201610.00The Polaroid Super Shooter was a rigid, plastic bodied instant camera, made in the U.S. between 1975- 1977. It originally retailed at $20-25. It used peel-apart 80-Series Land Pack Films such as Polaroid 87, 88, Viva (all discontinued), or type 100 film, such as Fuji FP-100C. The viewfinder adjusts according to the size of the film pack being used. The manual distance finder is on lens, and it uses ISO 75 for color prints and 3000 for black and white. The flash can be used with either standard or Hi-Power flashcubes. It has development rollers instead of spreader bars and inside the camera is a warning to keep the rollers clean plus instructions on how to remove them. The shutter requires two standard 1.5V AA batteries also inside the camera on both sides of the lens. The camera comes with a film warmer kept on the back in slots designed to hold it. Most Polaroids had this to help develop the film in cold weather. You took the picture and put it in the aluminum warmer and put it in your pocket. The instructions found on the warmer walked you through the proses. The Super Shooter Plus has a very handy built in standalone timer that could be set up to two minutes also for the film develop proses. Half the information was found on Retro CHRONICLE the rest by examining the camera and using Polaroids. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: Swinger 20 camera  Polaroid: Swinger 201965-1970 201410.001965-1970 Poor condition worth $1.00 in 2014 (Bad shutter)
Polaroid: Swinger 20 camera  Polaroid: Swinger 201965-1970 199015.001965-1970 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Polaroid: Swinger 20 camera  Polaroid: Swinger 201965-1970 20173.50The Polaroid Model 20 "Swinger" was a popular Land Camera produced by the Polaroid Corporation between 1965 and 1970. At $19.95 USD it was the first truly inexpensive instant camera, a fact that helped fuel its enormous popularity and made it one of the top-selling cameras of all time. The Swinger was especially successful in the youth market due to its low price, stylish appearance, and catchy "Meet the Swinger" jingle sung by Barry Manilow in a television advertisement featuring a young Ali MacGraw. The Swinger featured an extinction exposure meter tied to the aperture which displayed the word "YES" in a window below the viewfinder when the exposure was set correctly. Earlier models also displayed the word "NO" when not properly adjusted, while later units used only the YES indicator. The Swinger also included a built-in flashgun for AG-1 flashbulbs. The Swinger used Polaroid's 20-Series roll film, which was the first Polaroid roll film to develop outside the camera. Variants included the Model M-15 "Swinger Sentinel" (the Swinger II in non-US markets), which was a cheaper Swinger without the built-in flash, and the Model 3000 "Big Swinger", which used 100-Series pack film instead of the old-style picture rolls. The Swinger name was also used on several international-market Polaroid cameras in the 1960s and 1970s. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Polaroid: SX-70 camera  Polaroid: SX-701972-1977  201640.001972-1977 Fine condition worth $100.00 in 2016
Polaroid: SX-70 Model 2 camera  Polaroid: SX-70 Model 21974-1977  201615.001974 Good working condition but poor esthetic condition and for this reason is worth $35.00 in 2016.
Polaroid: SX-70 Model 3 camera  Polaroid: SX-70 Model 31975-1978  201520.001975-1978 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2015
Polaroid: SX-70 Sonar One Step camera  Polaroid: SX-70 Sonar One Step1978-1986  201510.001978-1986 good condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (pleather looks bad)
Prinz: Prinz Pocket 202 camera  Prinz: Prinz Pocket 202  20172.00The Prinz 202 uses 110 film cartridges of 12 and 20 exposures to produce a 13mm x 17mm negatives or transparencies. The camera was introduced about 1970 with the advent of the Magicube. The ASA rating of the film should be 32 to 125 with negative film and 40 to 80 with reversible films. The film is advanced with a two stroke thumb plunger on the bottom of the camera. It has a 25mm f/9.5 3 element Lumenized lens that is fixed focused from 5 feet to infinity. The shutter speed is 1/55 of a second and a view window in the back of the camera lets you use the film as the frame counter with numbers provided on the film backing. The camera also has a built in lens plus view finder cover, optical viewfinder, Magicube (X-Flashcube) socket, wrist strap clip, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount. There was an electronic flash available from Prinz catalog number 330-18 called the “Prinz Pocket “X” Light”. They also sold a Magicube extender catalog number 320-138 and a case for the camera catalog number 370-31. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Promatic: Compact-R camera  Promatic: Compact-R1977  201210.001977 poor condition worth $20.00 in 2014 ( bad mirror light seal)
Quantronics: Nishika 3D N 8000 camera  Quantronics: Nishika 3D N 80001980  199040.001989 New in box worth $45.00 in 2015
Quantronics: Nishika 3D N 8000 camera  Quantronics: Nishika 3D N 80001980  199225.001989 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2015
Quantronics: Nishika 3D N 9000 camera  Quantronics: Nishika 3D N 9000c1990s  199040.001989 New in box worth $45.00 in 2015
Revere: Automatic 1034 camera  Revere: Automatic 10341969  20125.001976 poor condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Revere: Automatic 1064 camera  Revere: Automatic 10641969 201612.00The Revere Automatic 1064 is a Kodapak film camera made by Minolta for 3M using the Revere label. It's a fixed-focus camera with the aperture set by a CdS cell above the lens. A red light will show in the viewfinder and front of the camera when flash is needed. The metering and the flash cube are powered by two AAA batteries in the film compartment. The built-in lens cover is automatically opened as the shutter is pressed. The camera has an optical viewfinder, Rokkor 1:8/38mm fixed focusing lens, shutter with speeds of 1/45 of a second (flash) or 1/90 of a second, film advance lever, and a flashcube socket that turns with each exposure. The camera uses 126 cassette 12 or 20 exposure cartridge film, flashcubes, hard point for a strap on most, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, view frame count window in the back cover, and was introduced in 1969. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Ricoh: Ricoh 126 C Auto CdS camera  Ricoh: Ricoh 126 C Auto CdS1969 201710.00The Ricoh 126C Auto CDS is a viewfinder camera with a fixed lens made in Japan by Ricoh in 1969. Ricoh produced the same camera for the Sears & Roebuck warehouses in the U.S.A. as part of Sears' Easi-Load camera series for 126 cartridge film. It was named Sears Easi-Load FC 600. The camera has an optical viewfinder, a Ricoh Rikenon f 2.8 / 40mm - 4 elements in 3 groups, Copal shutter with 1/125 of a second speed, Selenium meter exposure control, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, flash cube socket, and weighs 500g. The dimensions are 122mm x 91mm x 70mm. The camera uses flash cubes with a socket on the top that also has a release button. It also has a spring winder for mutable pictures by advancing to the next frame and flash bulb on the cube. The camera can be wound up to take more than 15 pictures without rewinding. The camera also calls for a 15V Eveready Number 504 carbon battery or Exell 504/220A alkaline battery. The battery mounts in the film compartment. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Ricoh: Ricoh 126 C Flex TLS camera  Ricoh: Ricoh 126 C Flex TLS1968-1971 201712.00The 126C-Flex TLS is an SLR for 126 film, with interchangeable lenses. It was made in Japan by Ricoh, c.1969. It was one of the very few SLRs made for the 126 cartridge format. It was fitted for flashcubes, and also equipped with a hot shoe and PC flash synch socket for mounting a flashgun. The shutter was limited to a range of 1/30 of a second to 1/300 of a second and B. The standard lens was a 55mm f2.8 Rikenon, but 100mm telephoto and 35mm wide-angle lenses were also available; lenses were fitted with a small-diameter, non-standard, screw-thread mount. The 126c-Flex was also unique for having an early form of shutter-priority auto-exposure with manual override. The camera uses a PX675 mercury battery for the metering and a 15-volt PX74 battery for the flashcubes. There is also a cable release socket and a ¼’ 20 thread tripod bush. A modified version of this camera without the flashcube feature was sold by Sears as the Sears 126 TLS Reflex, and (with flashcube socket) by Foto-Quelle badged as Revueflex TLS-C. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $25.00 in 2017.
Ricoh: Ricoh 500 ME camera  Ricoh: Ricoh 500 MEc1982  201610.00The camera was released in 1982. It has automatic exposure controlled by a CdS cell powered by a PX675 button battery. The original PX675 had mercury in it and should be replaced by the PX76 or the MR44. The camera also has a Ricoh Color Rikenon 40mm 1: 2.8. lens, Shutter from 1 / 500th to 1 / 8th of a second plus bulb, built in time delay lever, frame counter, shutter locking lever, battery check button, film speed dial (on the front of the lens), distance scale ring (on the lens), shutter speed ring (on the base of the lens), auto/manual dial, film rewind fold down crank handle (also the pull-up back lock), two conductor Hot shoe, right hand film advance lever (on the top), optical viewfinder, ¼” 20 thread tripod socket, film rewind release button (on the bottom), film winder coupler for attaching a electric film drive unit, and a film advance check window next to the hot shoe. The camera also has an interesting ME (Multi-Exposure) switch on the front of the camera that will reset the shutter without advancing the film. By holding down the red locking button on the slide switch and sliding the switch to its full position you reload the shutter for the rare intentional double exposure. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $30.00 in 2016.
Ricoh: Ricoh AF-5 camera  Ricoh: Ricoh AF-51982  199140.001985 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Ricoh: Ricoh AF-7 camera  Ricoh: Ricoh AF-7c1987 201612.00With the 1987 Ricoh AF-7, all you have to do is point the camera at the subject you wish to photograph and press the shutter release button. Focusing and exposure are done automatically. In addition, film loading, advance and rewinding are also automatic, so that everyone can enjoy this easy to use camera. The camera uses two alkaline penlight AA batteries or two manganese penlight AA batteries. The camera has tethered slip on lens cover, pop-up flash unit, flash on switch, flash ready LED (7 second intervals), easy film load system, rewind button plus switch, red Camera Shake Warning Signal in the viewfinder, frame counter, ASA film speed ring, shooting range of 3.3’ to infinity, 10 second self-timer with a switch, 38 mm F2.8 38mm Color Rikenon lens, programmed AE type electronic shutter, Cds Photocell exposure adjust, auto film advance, and two handy strap hard points. In normal temperatures (at 20 C/68 f and with new alkaline batteries) without using the Flash Unit, approximately 70 rolls of 36 exposure film can be taken. If the Flash Unit is used for every frame, then 7 rolls of 36 exposure film can be taken. It is important that you always push the Flash Unit back in when not in use. (If it is up, the batteries will wear out faster). The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Ricoh: Ricoh FF-3 AF Super (AF-9) camera  Ricoh: Ricoh FF-3 AF Super (AF-9)1983-1984  20165.001982 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Ricoh: Ricoh KR-10 (CR-10/XR-1000S/A-100) camera  Ricoh: Ricoh KR-10 (CR-10/XR-1000S/A-100)1980  201515.001981 Poor working condition with a sticky shutter half the time and worth $1.50 in parts in 2015
Ricoh: Ricoh KR-30 SP (XR-20 SP) camera  Ricoh: Ricoh KR-30 SP (XR-20 SP)1985  201610.001985 Poor condition worth $3.00 for parts in 2016
Ricoh: Ricoh KR-30 SP (XR-20 SP) camera  Ricoh: Ricoh KR-30 SP (XR-20 SP)1985  201618.001985 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2016
Ricoh: Ricoh KR-5 (XR-500/A-500) camera  Ricoh: Ricoh KR-5 (XR-500/A-500)c1979-1980  199650.001978 Fine condition worth $60.00 in 2014
Ricoh: Ricoh KR-5 Super (A-50/XR-5/CR-5) camera  Ricoh: Ricoh KR-5 Super (A-50/XR-5/CR-5)1982  201620.00The KR-5 Super is one of a series of SLRs for 35mm film by Ricoh, all accepting K-mount lenses. Others include the Ricoh KR-5. While essentially similar to the original KR-5, the "Super" offers a few improvements, including faster f/1.7 and f/2.0 standard lens options. While still limited to 1/8 second as the slowest shutter speed (besides B), the top speed increases to 1/1000 of a second, and the maximum flash sync speed is now 1/125 of a second. While there is still no PC terminal for attaching an external flash, the hot shoe has an additional contact which permits dedicated Ricoh flash units to illuminate a flash-ready LED beneath the viewfinder eyepiece. Another LED faces forward to indicate when the self-timer is counting down before exposure. The camera was introduced in 1978 and was the successor to the original KR. The KR series was one of the lowest priced SLR’s on the market. The camera came with Ricoh Rikenon 1:2 50mm lens and some consider it one of the sharpest 50mm f/2 ever produced. One thing worth mentioning is while basically all K mount lenses (with the exception of those without an aperture ring and the DA digital only lenses) will fit and function on the KR-5 Super, not all Ricoh K mount lenses are compatible with a Pentax body. Information was gleaned from (mycameracabinet.wordpress.com). The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $40.00 in 2016.
Ricoh: Ricoh Myport 330 Super camera  Ricoh: Ricoh Myport 330 Superc1995  200810.001995 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Ricoh: Ricoh R1050 camera  Ricoh: Ricoh R10502000  20164.00The Ricoh R1050 AF 35mm point and shoot film camera was introduced in 2000. It comes with a 38 to 105mm Macro Multi-AF aspheric zoom lens. It also has a built in flash, red eye reduction, auto focus, auto film advance, auto rewind, mid-roll rewind, built in lens cover with shutter lock, right thumb zoom selector, optical viewfinder, remote control shutter release, ¼” by 1” LCD mode plus info screen, flash on/off button, flash ready LED, delay timer button, and a handy carry strap. The camera uses one 6V CR-P2 battery to power all functions. The zoom lens extends 3” in two sections to achieve the 105mm. The camera also has a fake type panorama mode that crop both the viewfinder and the film with a slide switch on top of the viewfinder eye viewer. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Ricoh: Ricoh RZ-770 camera  Ricoh: Ricoh RZ-7701990 20165.00This camera was introduced in 1990 and is a 35mm compact. It has a 35-70 mm / f5.0-f9.5 (6 elements 5 groups) zoom lens, active auto focus from 1.2 m (4 ft.) at 35mm to infinity, programmed Electronic shutter with speeds of 1/5 to 1/250 of a second, electronic self-timer with LED countdown indicator (operating delay approximately 10 seconds), real image zoom viewfinder (field of view about 83%), programmed AE exposure adjustment with CdS cell Coupling range (EV8.0-15.0 (ISO 100)), Ricoh auto-load system, automatic 1st frame set, automatic film rewind at the end of film, mid-roll rewind, built-in electronic flash automatically activates in dim light, flash off button, red eye reduction, flash recycle time of About 5 to 7 seconds, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount in base of camera body, and takes film speeds of ISO 100, 400 plus compatible with DX system. The camera is powered by a 3V lithium battery CR123A or equivalent. The dimensions are 126 mm (W) x 69 mm (H) x 44 mm (D) and the weight is 270g without battery. The zoom lens is operated with two right index finger buttons near the shutter release button on the top right of the camera body. This camera comes with the original carry-case, carrying strap, and the instruction booklet. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $25.00 in 2016.
Ricoh: Ricoh RZ-770 camera  Ricoh: Ricoh RZ-7701990 20165.00This camera was introduced in 1990 and is a 35mm compact. It has a 35-70 mm / f5.0-f9.5 (6 elements 5 groups) zoom lens, active auto focus from 1.2 m (4 ft.) at 35mm to infinity, programmed Electronic shutter with speeds of 1/5 to 1/250 of a second, electronic self-timer with LED countdown indicator (operating delay approximately 10 seconds), real image zoom viewfinder (field of view about 83%), programmed AE exposure adjustment with CdS cell Coupling range (EV8.0-15.0 (ISO 100)), Ricoh auto-load system, automatic 1st frame set, automatic film rewind at the end of film, mid-roll rewind, built-in electronic flash automatically activates in dim light, flash off button, red eye reduction, flash recycle time of About 5 to 7 seconds, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount in base of camera body, and takes film speeds of ISO 100, 400 plus compatible with DX system. The camera is powered by a 3V lithium battery CR123A or equivalent. The dimensions are 126 mm (W) x 69 mm (H) x 44 mm (D) and the weight is 270g without battery. The zoom lens is operated with two right index finger buttons near the shutter release button on the top right of the camera body. This camera comes with the original carry-case, carrying strap, and the instruction booklet. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $25.00 in 2016.
Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster camera  Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster1993-1996  20135.001993-1996 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts in 2014 (battery leak)
Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster 130Z camera  Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster 130Zc1995  20166.001996 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster AF-P camera  Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster AF-Pc1989  20166.001989 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016
Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster Zoom camera  Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster Zoomc1990  20135.001990 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster Zoom 70 camera  Ricoh: Ricoh Shotmaster Zoom 70c1990  200310.001990 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Ricoh: Ricoh TF-500 D camera  Ricoh: Ricoh TF-500 D1988  20155.001988 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Ricoh: Ricoh XF-30 camera  Ricoh: Ricoh XF-301985  20155.001985 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Riken: Ricolet camera  Riken: Ricolet1954  20155.001954 Poor condition worth $15.00 for parts in 2015 (shutter slow)
Rochester Optical: Premo (folding) camera  Rochester Optical: Premo (folding)1893-1895  201550.001893-1897 poor condition worth $100.00 in 2015
Rolls Camera: Rolls camera  Rolls Camera: Rollsc1939  200015.001939 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Sakar: CyberPix (16380) camera  Sakar: CyberPix (16380)c2007  20095.002006 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 resolution)
Sakar: Digital (27286) camera  Sakar: Digital (27286)c2007  20135.002008 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 resolution)
Sakar: Digital Concepts 3.1 (89379Z) camera  Sakar: Digital Concepts 3.1 (89379Z)2005  20112.002005 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (3.1MP)
Sakar: Digital Concepts 5.1 (87492) camera  Sakar: Digital Concepts 5.1 (87492)2004  201310.002004 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (5.1MP)
Sakar: FF-16 camera  Sakar: FF-161990  20005.001990 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Sakar: Hello Kitty (Digital) camera  Sakar: Hello Kitty (Digital)c2009  20163.00The Hello Kitty VGA Digital Camera from Sakar is a fun, entry-level digital camera for children and Hello Kitty aficionados. This digital camera easily fits small hands and weighs only 8.8 ounces with the two AAA batteries installed. It featured three interchangeable face plates to fit a variety of Hello Kitty moods. Photos can be previewed on the cameras' 1.1" preview screen and it came with Photo Booth Editing Software. This VGA resolution (640 x 480 pixels) camera takes video clips and can also be used as a webcam. The camera can take up to 79 pictures at VGA resolution and 319 at QVGA resolution. The other camera features are a built in flash, flash ready LED, f12.6 4.5mm lens, optical viewfinder, 4 selection circular button including flash on, menu button, shutter release button, USB connector, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and a handy strap mounting point. The camera was introduced in 2009 by Sanrio and made by Sakar. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Sakar: Matrix Zone (kit) camera  Sakar: Matrix Zone (kit)c2002  20155.002002 New condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Sakar: Matrix Zone (kit) camera  Sakar: Matrix Zone (kit)c2002  20155.002002 New condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Sakar: Princess (16031) camera  Sakar: Princess (16031)c2008  201015.002008 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 resolution)
Sakar: Star Wars (92022) camera  Sakar: Star Wars (92022)c2009  201310.002006 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 resolution)
Sakar: Vkidz (88374) camera  Sakar: Vkidz (88374)2009  20145.002009 New condition worth $8.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 resolution)
Sakar: Vkidz (88376) camera  Sakar: Vkidz (88376)c2009  20145.002009 New condition worth $8.00 in 2014 (640 x 480 resolution)
Samsung: Digimax 350S camera  Samsung: Digimax 350S2003  201415.002002 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (3.3MP)
Samsung: Fino 145S (Maxima 1450 AF / IBEX 1450 AF) camera  Samsung: Fino 145S (Maxima 1450 AF / IBEX 1450 AF)c1995  201315.001995 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Samsung: Fino 35S (Maxima 33S) camera  Samsung: Fino 35S (Maxima 33S)1999  199410.001990 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Samsung: Fino 700S (Maxima Zoom 70GL) camera  Samsung: Fino 700S (Maxima Zoom 70GL)c1999  201310.002001 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Samsung: Fino 80SE (Maxima Zoom 80GLM) camera  Samsung: Fino 80SE (Maxima Zoom 80GLM)c1999  201315.001999 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Samsung: Ibex 3X (Platinum Series 115 Zoom) camera  Samsung: Ibex 3X (Platinum Series 115 Zoom)c1998-2002  201610.00Introduced in 1998 this is a great camera from Samsung! The Ibex 3x is compact, lightweight, features a 38-115mm power zoom and a sliding lens cover to protect your lens. Also has multi-mode flash with red-eye reduction, fill-in, off, auto, and backlight control. Intelligent shooting modes including step, double exposure, bulb, portrait, continuous, interval, and landscape/infinity shooting. It also has a panorama switch, self-timer, quartz date, and caption stamp. Easy to read LCD that is ½” wide and 2” long. The handy carry strap was included in the original package and the camera came with a one year limited manufacturers warranty. The camera requires one 3v Lithium battery and measures approximately 5"L x 2-1/2"H x 1-3/4"W. This camera has a silver and Black finish and has “Made in Korea” in a strip on the bottom. The Samsung serial number for this camera is 93129036. It also comes with a panorama switch that crops both the film and the viewfinder. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
Samsung: L200 (SL200) camera  Samsung: L200 (SL200)2008  201420.002008 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (10.2MP)
Samsung: L200 (SL200) camera  Samsung: L200 (SL200)2008  201315.002008 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (10.2MP)
Samsung: Maxima 25 camera  Samsung: Maxima 251996-1998  200512.001996 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Samsung: Maxima Zoom 105 (AF Zoom 1050) camera  Samsung: Maxima Zoom 105 (AF Zoom 1050)c1994  200915.001999 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Samsung: Maxima Zoom 77i (AF Zoom 777i) camera  Samsung: Maxima Zoom 77i (AF Zoom 777i)c1998  200610.001995 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Samsung: Slim Zoom 1150 (Fuzzy Zoom 1150) camera  Samsung: Slim Zoom 1150 (Fuzzy Zoom 1150)c1993  20163.001993 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2016
Samsung: Slim Zoom 70G (AF Slim Zoom / Mini Zoom 7X) camera  Samsung: Slim Zoom 70G (AF Slim Zoom / Mini Zoom 7X)c1998  200210.001996 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Sanei: Samoca 35 II camera  Sanei: Samoca 35 IIc1950s  201455.001954 Good condition worth $75.00 in 2014
Sanei: Samoca MR camera  Sanei: Samoca MR1961 20178.00Sanei Sangyō K.K. (三栄産業㈱) was a Japanese camera maker. It made cameras under the Samoca brand from 1952. It was renamed to Samoca Camera K.K. (サモかカメラ㈱, Samoca Camera Co., Ltd.) in 1955. Samoca cameras and accessories were distributed by Hattori Tokei-ten at least until 1956. The company was perhaps renamed Sanei Sangyō again in 1958, and Samoca cameras are known at least until 1962. The logo of the company consisted of AAA inside a triangle; the three "A" are certainly inspired by the company name "Sanei", which can be phonetically understood as "three A" in Japanese. The Samoca MR was one of the late camera models of Samoca, introduced in 1961. It is a rangefinder camera for 35mm film, mainly constructed of metal parts. The lens is a Samocar 1:2.8 f=45mm. The flash synchronized leaf shutter had speeds from 1 to 1/300 sec. plus B. The optical viewfinder is combined with a superimposed coupled rangefinder. The camera has settings for up to 200 ASA film and apertures of 2.8 to 22. It also has a cold shoe, single action frame advance lever, screw in cable shutter release in the shutter button, frame counter in the bottom of the camera, rewind release button, rewind fold down crank handle, focus capability from 3 feet to infinity, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Sanyo: VPC-S600 camera  Sanyo: VPC-S6002006  20163.002007 poor esthetic condition worth $15.00 in 2016 (6.0MB)
Sanyo: VPC-T1496 camera  Sanyo: VPC-T14962010  201515.002012 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (14 MP)
Sanyo: VPC-T700 camera  Sanyo: VPC-T7002004  201510.002009 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2015 (7.0MP)
Sawyers: Nomad 620 camera  Sawyers: Nomad 620c1957  201615.00Sawyer was the maker of the original View Master Product line. The Sawyer line of plastic cameras is less known, but just as charming in style and design. The 1957 Nomad 620 is a large, 620 box camera with a chocolate brown Bakelite body and a grid patterned faceplate. The camera has a Nomad meniscus f/15 fixed focus lens from 4 feet to infinity. It also has a single speed, flash synchronized, with instantaneous plus bulb setting shutter. It also has auto shutter lock to prevent double exposure, a Nomad flash attachment taking two AA batteries for the M2 bulbs, flash ejector socket, an eye level viewfinder, a red frame counter round window in the back, and you could purchase a close-up attachment and filters. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $30.00 in 2016.
Sea & Sea: Pocket Marine camera  Sea & Sea: Pocket Marine1981  201315.001981 fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
SeaLife: Reefmaster RC (SL515) camera  SeaLife: Reefmaster RC (SL515)1999  201210.001999-2005 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts in 2014 (case leak)
Sears Roebuck: 126 Reflex TLS camera  Sears Roebuck: 126 Reflex TLS1968-1971  199015.001969 good condition worth $40.00 with the lens in 2014 (55mm)
Sears Roebuck: Sears Easi Load Auto 600 camera  Sears Roebuck: Sears Easi Load Auto 6001972  20169.001969 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Sears Roebuck: Sears KS 500 camera  Sears Roebuck: Sears KS 500c1979-1980  199035.001978 Good condition worth $25.00 plus $40.00 for the lenses (50mm & a 80-200mm)
Sears Roebuck: Sears KS Super II camera  Sears Roebuck: Sears KS Super II1981  200725.001981 fine condition worth $45.00 with the lens in 2014 (28-70mm)
Sears Roebuck: Sears M35 Super camera  Sears Roebuck: Sears M35 Super1986  20172.00The Sears M35 Super (Ricoh AF-60) with a model number inside on the back cover of 444.736700 plus a serial 16905738 and it was made in Taiwan R.O.C... Sliding back the cover on the front of the camera reveals a 35mm f/3.5 4 element Rikenon lens paired to an electronically controlled shutter. The self-timer is activated by the switch on the front next to the grip and the flash pops up when needed. The camera was introduced in 1986 and originated in Japan. The dimensions on this 35mm film camera are 11.7 x 6.5 x 5mm. The Ricoh AF-60D is the data back equipped variant of the AF-60, one of half a dozen or so consumer grade autofocus point-and-shoot cameras introduced by Ricoh in the mid to late 1980s. The sears M35 Super also has auto focus, auto focus indicator LED, auto exposure, auto flash when needed, flash ready light, DX film auto set, frame counter, Film ISO observation window in the back cover, film monitor system, optical Albada type bright-frame viewfinder, built in lens cover that is also an on/off switch, and a handy carry strap connector. The lens can focus from 1m to infinity and the programed shutter has speeds available of 1/30 of a second to 1/500 of a second. The ISO range is 100 to 1000 DX coded and the camera operates on two AA alkaline batteries. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and worth $1.00 for parts in 2017.
Sears Roebuck: Sears Tele 410 camera  Sears Roebuck: Sears Tele 410c1970s  20153.001970 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Sears Roebuck: Sears TLS (1000 MX, MXB) camera  Sears Roebuck: Sears TLS (1000 MX, MXB)1967  199130.001974 Good condition worth $35.00 with lens in 2014
Sears Roebuck: Tower 34 Box camera  Sears Roebuck: Tower 34 Box1948-1951 20175.00The Sears & Roebuck Tower 34 box camera was first listed in 1948 and production ceased in 1951. The front face of this box camera is entirely chrome as is the lens ring escutcheon. This camera uses 120 type film and was sold in very great quantities by correspondence thanks to the seasonal catalogs of Sears and Roebuck. It is Ansco which manufactured it for Sears. This accounts for when it is opened, the film recommended is format 120 or B2, and B2 is the name of the 120 film by Ansco/Agfa. An optical finder is on right side of the camera and occupies the depth of the camera. The camera also has a red window in the back cover for frame count using the paper backing of the roll film, a frame advance knob that is pulled out to release the film carriage, a red shutter release lever, a two socket flash attach point, a pull out aperture tab with two stings (f/8 to f11), a shutter speed of 1/50 of a second, and it came with a leather handle. The camera originally sold for about $8.50 and $2.50 for the flash unit. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Sears Roebuck: Tower 39 Automatic 35 camera  Sears Roebuck: Tower 39 Automatic 351961  20165.001961 Poor condition worth $1.00 in 2016 (shutter not working)
Sears Roebuck: Tower Foldex 20 camera  Sears Roebuck: Tower Foldex 20c1948-1953  201515.001950-1953 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015 Most of the Sears cameras were branded under the names Seroco or Tower. Sears did not manufacture cameras of its own, but sold those made by other companies, including the Conley Company, which was acquired by Sears in 1910, and which manufactured cameras exclusively for Sears. In 1924 Sears also bought the Seneca Camera company. Shortly after, around 1927, Sears ceased camera production by these companies, and sold their camera assets to the United States Camera Company. However, until around 1967 Sears continued to sell cameras manufactured by others including United States Camera Company. Pho-Tak Corporation, of Chicago, USA, was a manufacturer of simple box cameras. Their name is intertwined with United States Camera, effectively the same company, who produced variations on several Pho-Tak models under different names. The Sears Tower Foldex 20 was one of these cameras. Actually there are four versions of the Foldex. The (United States Camera Company) Rollex 20 is the first of this type and has a small difference in the camera open release button plus does not have a hot shoe. The Sears Tower Foldex 20 and the Pho-Tak Foldex 20 are the same camera with different lens escutcheons with white lettering on black. Later versions of the Pho-Tak Foldex 20 had a plain metal lens escutcheon with black lettering. These cameras were fixed focus, fixed aperture, with a B to 1/50 of a second leaf shutter. The last of these cameras is the Pho-Tak Foldex 30 or Foldex 6.3. This camera has a Steinheil Munchen Cassar 100mm f/6.3 lens and a Vario diaphragm shutter. Although it is called the Foldex 30, nowhere on the camera will you see the number 30 but you will find the 6.3 aperture setting and Foldex does appear on the portrait table support leg. This cameras other differences are that it has a plastic top that encloses the viewfinder, adjustable shutter speeds from B to 1/200 of a second, aperture settings of 6.3 to 22, manual shutter cocking, and the wheel was removed from the shutter release translator. The distinctive characteristic of all these Foldex cameras is that the shutter has to be tripped with a lever that is integrated into the edge of the front door panel. They also can use 120 or 620 film and were produced from 1950-1953 with the Foldex 30 going on till 1962.
Sedic: Sedic Sport F camera  Sedic: Sedic Sport F1977  20164.00This 110 camera was first produced in 1977 by the Sedic Camera Company. The Sedic camera Company was a Japanese company that offered exposure light meters, pocket cameras for 110 film, and other cameras plus as a subcontractor, it worked with Fujifilm and Hanimex. The Sport F has a 26.5mm (f9.5) fixed-focus Sedic color balance lens and a single shutter speed of 1/60 of a second. Sedic also sold a close-up lens for this camera (focusing to 4 inches), wide-angle lens, telephoto lens and a motor drive. The camera also has a left index finger film advance wheel in the front, flipflash bar socket, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, optical viewfinder, plunger shutter release socket, and a handy carry strap hard point. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $5.00 in 2016.
Seneca Camera: Scout Box No.2 camera  Seneca Camera: Scout Box No.21913-1925  20168.001913 poor condition worth $5.00 in 2016
Sharper Image: DCF-1 camera  Sharper Image: DCF-1  20075.002003 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (1.3MP)
Shaw-Harrison Corp: Sabre 620 camera  Shaw-Harrison Corp: Sabre 6201956-1972  201613.001972 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P10 camera  Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P102003  201310.002003 Good condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (5.0MP)
Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P10 camera  Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P102003  20155.002003 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015 (5.0MP)
Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P32 camera  Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P322003  200620.002002 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (3.2MP)
Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P51 camera  Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P512002  20173.50The Sony DSC-P51 was introduced in 2002 along with the P71 and P31. The camera sports a 2-megapixel sensor that captures 1,600 x 1,200 images for prints at sizes up to 8 x 10 inches. It has an autofocus lens with 2x optical zoom and 6x digital zoom. It is capable of connecting with PCs and Macs via USB port and uses two AA batteries. Rechargeable nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries were included with new camera but the camera will accept alkaline batteries and also included is a MSA-16A 16MB Memory Stick media, BC-CS1 charger, video and USB cables, wrist strap, and software on CD. The maximum ISO is 400 and the minimum is 100. The camera has a built in flash, TTL metering, auto plus manual focusing, USB serial interface, 8 cm macro focus range, aperture range f3.8 to f8.0, 2 seconds to 1/1000 of a second shutter speeds, 41 mm focal length, self-timer, movie mode (silent), red eye reduction, and a tunnel type optical viewfinder. Though the P51 is designed for point-and-shoot simplicity, there are several options for more adventurous photographers, including manual focus with macro, adjustable ISO and white-balance settings, exposure compensation, and the ability to shoot black-and-white, sepia, solarized, and negative images. The maximum memory stick the camera can work with is 128mb. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and worth $1.00 in 2017.
Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P8 camera  Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-P82003  201110.002003 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (3.2MP)
Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-S650 camera  Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-S6502007  201420.002007 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (7.2MP)
Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-T1 camera  Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-T12003  201310.002004 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (5.0MP)
Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-W100 camera  Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-W1002006  201420.002006 Fine condition worth $30.00 in 2014 (8.1MP)
Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-W230 camera  Sony: Cyber-shot DSC-W2302009  201330.002009 Good condition worth $40.00 in 2014 (12.1MP)
Sony: Mavica CD300 camera  Sony: Mavica CD3002001  20160.002001 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016 (3.3MP)
Sony: Mavica FD-100 camera  Sony: Mavica FD-1002002  20150.002002 Fine condition worth $20.00 with charger in 2015 (1.2MP)
Sony: Mavica FD-75 camera  Sony: Mavica FD-752001  20165.002001 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2016 (0.4MP)
Sony: Mavica FD-81 camera  Sony: Mavica FD-811998  20155.001998 good condition worth $15.00 in 2015 (1.0MP)
Sony: Mavica FD-83 camera  Sony: Mavica FD-831999  200225.001999 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (0.8MP)
Sony: Mavica FD-83 camera  Sony: Mavica FD-831999  201610.001999 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014 (0.8MP)
Southern: Telecom Slick camera  Southern: Telecom Slick  20145.002010 New condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (0.3MP)
Spartus: Full-Vue camera  Spartus: Full-Vue1948-1960 201510.001948-1960 Poor condition worth $2.00 in 2015
Spartus: Full-Vue camera  Spartus: Full-Vue1948-1960 20178.00The simple Spartus Full-Vue plastic pseudo TLR was made from 1948 to 1960 by American manufacturer Spartus, later Herold Products. This model exposes 2¼" square images on 120 film. The lens of its viewfinder is larger in diameter than its taking lens, giving a bright finder image on the hooded matte screen. The name "Full-Vue" resembles another box camera with big reflecting finder, the British Ful-Vue. In fact, the more direct connection is to the Falcon Magni-View from Utility Mfg. Co. of New York, several of whose models were reissued by Spartus. Spartus used various metal face-plate designs and plastic moldings over the production period. Early examples were made of Bakelite, although later models may have been other plastics. The Full-Vue is also seen labeled with "The Spencer Co." or "Galter Products Co." as the manufacturer's name—a nebulous distinction, as all these entities shared the same address on West Lake St. in Chicago. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $12.00 in 2017.
Spartus: Spartus 35 camera  Spartus: Spartus 351947-1954 201711.00The Spartus 35 and Spartus 35 F are a series of 35mm film Viewfinder cameras made by Spartus and then Herold Mfg. co. in Chicago, USA, and produced from 1947 to 1954. The original black version of the body bears a strong resemblance to the Argus A. Later Spartus "35" models from Herold Products switched to a gray & silver body style somewhat reminiscent of the Kodak Pony. Their bodies is Bakelite. There are many different lens & shutter combinations of the Spartus 35 and 35 F. The most expensive model offering an f/3.5 coated Anastigmat lens, four shutter speeds from 1/25 to 1/150 sec. plus T and B. But, commonly the cameras have a simple manual scale focus, one speed shutter (Inst 1/50 / Time) and 50mm f/6.3 (or f/7.7) lens with apertures f/6.3-7.7-11-16. Also, there were many cosmetic variations of the body during its manufacturing period. The "F" designation indicated a top flash sync connector bolts on the top plate. Late Spartus 35 models also have connector holes or bolts for dedicated bulb flash units on the top. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
Spartus: Spartus 35 F camera  Spartus: Spartus 35 F1947-1954  201515.001947-1954 Good condition and worth $20.00 in 2015
Spartus: Spartus Box 120 camera  Spartus: Spartus Box 1201950  201712.00The Spartus 120 is a simple box camera made of an early type of plastic called Bakelite in 1950. At the time of the 120’s introduction, a great multitude of relatively inexpensive cameras (including the Spartus 35F) were being manufactured in Chicago by the same factories but sold under a puzzlingly broad range of different but related brands with Spartus being the cornerstone of it all. This very same camera was also sold as the Sunbeam 120 and a brown-colored variant was sold under the name “Spartus 120 Flash Camera” that had two connectors on the top. The 120 utilizes a tube viewfinder that had a piece of glass at each end with no optics. It also has a round red window in the back for frame count, approximately 1/60 of a second shutter, one direction film advance turn knob, approximately 50mm lens, and a handy carry handle. The suggested retail price in 1950 was $3.97. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
Spartus: Spartus Box 120 (box) camera  Spartus: Spartus Box 120 (box)1950 201610.00The Spartus No. 120 Box Camera was manufactured by the Spartus Camera Corp. in circa 1942. A simple and inexpensive box camera constructed of Bakelite with a smart chrome decorated front. Exactly the same as the Spartus No. 116/ 616 camera except in film size. This camera was capable of capturing eight full size 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 inch pictures on No. 120 size film, as the name implies. It featured two waist level brilliant view finders for vertical and horizontal pictures, an optically ground and polished fixed focus lens, single f5.6 aperture, a leather carry handle, film winder knob, and a simple time and single action 1/50 of a second instantaneous shutter that did not need preloading. The camera was priced at $3.97 in 1942 and had some success though it is not known how many were produced or what year production stoped. The camera pictured above is in fine condition and worth $30.00 in 2016.
Spartus: Vanguard camera  Spartus: Vanguardc1962  201616.00The Spartus Vanguard was made of plastic with a metal face plate, shutter and flash contacts. It uses 127 film and was made by Herold Products of Chicago. The camera has accommodations for a plug-in flash unit and along with the optical viewfinder that separates it from the common box camera. The shutter has one speed of 1/50 of a second and is without double exposure protection. The camera was introduced in 1962 and is the flash version of the Spatus Rocket and looks identical save the different face plate, the two holes for the flash and a "COLOR - B&W" aperture selector. A soft plastic handle was provided and attached to a square hard point buttons on each side of the camera with the button holes at the ends of the handle. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $25.00 in 2016.
Superheadz: Plamodel camera  Superheadz: Plamodelc2000s  201515.00 Unique gift for your photography-loving friends, "do it yourself" 35mm camera from Superheadz (sometimes also called LOMO) is completely opposite to the known "explosion" Leica or Nikon cameras. I am not sure which was the first "build it yourself" camera, but Ansco was producing its Craftsman in 1950. Building your own camera is fun, but this one can remain collectible only if it still stitting in the original box or a vinyl bag and until it was assembled. This camera comes in the regular black or Moriyama special edition (cow photo on the camera and a bag). The camera pictured here is worth $15.00 in 2015
Tokyo Kogaku: Beseler Auto 100 Topcon camera  Tokyo Kogaku: Beseler Auto 100 Topcon1964-1973 201723.001964-1973. 35mm SLR camera. Through-the-lens (TTL) metering. First automatic-exposure SLR camera in the world. Also known as the Topcon Uni and the Hanimex Topcon RE Auto. It's one of the first auto exposure SLR cameras with TTL metering. It is usually bundled with a 53mm f/2.0 six element lens which is compatible with the UV lens mount. It has a Seikosha made shutter with speeds from 1s to 1/500 of a second with B. Flash sync is at 1/60 of a second. It features a needle based TTL center-weighted metering system using a CdS cell. The meter has a range of 5 to 18 EV at (ASA 100), settable to film speeds from 25 to 400 ASA. The shutter speeds in metered shutter priority mode can only use the red shutter indicators down to 1/8 of a second. It uses a 1.35v mercury battery no longer available but has a 1.35V Zinc-Air replacement MRB625. The film transport uses a single stroke film advance lever and a rewind crank with release button. Unlike most later-day SLRs, this camera has a leaf shutter, leading to a more complex exposure sequence. When idle, the mirror is down to block the film from exposure (like an auxiliary shutter), and shutter and aperture are wide open. When the shutter release is pressed, the shutter closes, the aperture stops down, and the mirror turns up. Once the mirror has moved, the shutter opens then closes. The mirror falls down back to block the light pathway as both the shutter and aperture return to their open idle positions. Most of the information here is from camera-wiki.org. The camera pictured here has a Tokyo Kogaku Topcor 135mm f4.0 lens (good condition) worth $10.00, Tokyo Kogaku Topcor 35mm f3.5 lens (good condition) worth $10.00, and the Tokyo Kogaku Topcor 53mm f2.0 lens that came with the camera body when purchased (good condition) $10.00. The camera is in Good condition and worth $35.00 in 2017
Tokyo Kogaku: Topcon Uni camera  Tokyo Kogaku: Topcon Uni1964-1973  201220.001964 good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Tokyo Kogaku: Topcon Uni camera  Tokyo Kogaku: Topcon Uni1964-1973  201622.001964-1973 fine condition worth $45.00 in 2016
Toshiba: PDR-M25 camera  Toshiba: PDR-M252001  201015.002001 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (2.2MP)
Tougodo: Hit (Made in Japan) camera  Tougodo: Hit (Made in Japan)c1950s  199512.001950 good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Tougodo: Speedex camera  Tougodo: Speedexc1950s-1960s  200115.001963 good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Traid Corp: Fotron camera  Traid Corp: Fotronc1960s  19975.001960's good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Trusite Camera: Trusite Minicam camera  Trusite Camera: Trusite Minicamc1947  20163.00As with many other models dubbed "minicam," this is a model for half-frame 127 format—in other words, images approximately 3×4 cm, achieved by advancing each number on the film's backing paper to a first, then a second red window on the back. The Trusite Minicam is a simple affair with a fixed focus 50mm meniscus lens and an instant/time shutter. The body is cast is metal and in 1947, a kit with the camera, a flashgun, and four flashbulbs sold for $9.95. A version with Girl Scout branding is also known. The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $10.00 in 2016. Trusite Camera Co. of New York City produced a few simple models, all for 127 film, during the 1940s. The lens/shutter assembly seems quite similar to that used on the Utility Manufacturing Company cameras (also from New York).
Universal Camera: Mercury II (Mod CX) camera  Universal Camera: Mercury II (Mod CX)c1945  201225.001945 good condition worth $55.00 in 2014
Universal Camera: Meteor camera  Universal Camera: Meteor1949  20155.001947 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Universal Camera: Uniflash camera  Universal Camera: Uniflashc1940s  199910.001950 poor condition worth $3.00 in 2014 (shutter not working)
Universal Camera: Univex A camera  Universal Camera: Univex A1933  20153.501933 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Universal Camera: Univex Model AF camera  Universal Camera: Univex Model AFc1935 201516.00The UniveX Model AF is a smaller camera, measuring 2-1/8” x 4” x 7/8” when closed. The shutter has only two settings, I and T (instant and time). The lens has but a single stop, and was clearly designed for outdoor use. However, for Universal’s target demographic, this was no problem. Amateur photography in those days precluded the use of flash, and the UniveX AF was a viable competitor to Kodak’s offerings at a lower price. The 1935 camera was offered in four colors – black, brown, green, and blue. In 1936, Universal produced a Girl Scout version of the camera, which was listed in the Official Girl Scout Catalog for the price of $1.00. Kodak’s Girl Scout Kodak was also listed, at a price of $6.00. Bearing in mind that the Depression was still in full swing in 1936, one can only imagine that the UniveX Girl Scout Camera attracted a significant following. In 1938, an improved version was introduced, bearing a single button bellows release and a new color scheme (black and green vs. the former all-green model). The little UniveX Model A was also listed in the Official Girl Scout Catalog from 1933 on, at a price of 35 cents. Other special versions of the Model AF were produced as premiums and corporate giveaways. “The Hollywood Camera” was a special version about which little is known – it carried no UniveX markings at all, and no documentation of its production exists. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $20.00 in 2015.
unknown companies: Accoutrements Pop Cam camera  unknown companies: Accoutrements Pop Cam  20167.00It's not just a photograph, it's a work of Pop Art! The Pop Cam introduced in 2003, produces photos that mimic the image repetition and saturated color palettes of famous pop artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. One snap of the Pop Cam takes four pictures in the span of one second and preserves them in four different hues on one single print. Each 4" x 2-1/2" x 1-1/2" (10.2 cm x 6.4 cm x 3.8 cm) plastic camera uses any standard 35mm film and has no flash. With some imagination and a little experimentation you might capture that perfect Pop Cam picture that will lead to your fifteen minutes of fame. Instructions included. This is a reusable 35mm camera requiring no batteries because it doesn’t have a flash so it is really better used outdoors with a 200 ISO film – or higher for much better results. You need proper light in order to bring out the colors. Each of the four lenses is made of colored plastic, so you end up with four tinted semi-identical pictures on the same piece of film: green, yellow, red and blue. The exposure takes little over one second, so when you’re subject moves, or you move the camera, you’ll record that movement. The shutter speed is 1/60 of a second and the plastic lenses are about 50mm. It takes 4 pictures in succession within roughly one second, clockwise from the bottom left to the bottom right. This is achieved by a spring loaded mechanism on the inside, which gets wound up when you advance the film with the right thumb film advance wheel. The lenses each use 25% of one 35mm film frame. The camera pictured here is in New condition and worth $8.00 in 2016.
unknown companies: Barbie (pocket) camera  unknown companies: Barbie (pocket)c1980s  20162.001998-2004 New condition worth $10.00 in 2016
unknown companies: Benson & Hedges 100's camera  unknown companies: Benson & Hedges 100'sc1995  20154.001995 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Coby Snapp Cam3001 camera  unknown companies: Coby Snapp Cam3001  20175.00Shoot it, share it, SNAPP it! Introducing the Coby SNAPP CAM3001 from Coby Electronics: This pocket-sized digital camcorder lets you shoot video, take pictures, and play back your files at the touch of a button on a brilliant 1.44" LCD screen. A built-in SD/SDHC card slot offers expandable memory for more than 2 hours of recording time, and the integrated USB plug eliminates the need for cables. Easy-to-use ArcSoft video editing software and YouTube uploader let you share your videos online in minutes. USB extension cable and hand strap also included. The camera also has a 1.3MP CMOS sensor with 4x digital zoom, VGA (640 x 480) @ 30fps, AVI file (Motion JPEG codec), Up to 8GB memory with optional SD/SDHC card, and a convenient integrated USB 2.0 Hi-speed plug for fast file transfers. You can view recorded videos and photos on a TV with the included AV cable. The camera pictured here is in New condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
unknown companies: Coca-Cola (can, no pop-up flash) camera  unknown companies: Coca-Cola (can, no pop-up flash)1998  20168.001998 Fine condition worth $30.00 in 2016
unknown companies: Coca-Cola (red/white) camera  unknown companies: Coca-Cola (red/white)1999  19990.001999 New condition worth $25.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Crystar camera  unknown companies: Crystarc1950s  199715.001956-? good condition worth $25.00 in 2014 (1.75 inches wide)
unknown companies: CVS (silver) camera  unknown companies: CVS (silver)c1990s  20083.002000's good condition worth $2.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Embassy Suites Spider-Man 2 camera  unknown companies: Embassy Suites Spider-Man 22004  200410.002004 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Excell AE100B camera  unknown companies: Excell AE100Bc1996  20152.001996 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Handy (keychain) camera  unknown companies: Handy (keychain)c1970s  19991.001970's Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
unknown companies: High School Musical (35mm, Walt Disney) camera  unknown companies: High School Musical (35mm, Walt Disney)2006  201610.00This camera kit was produced by Disney and the Disney Channel and sold about the same time in 2006. The kit comes with a small picture frame with Zac Efron’s picture in it, a roll of Kodak 35mm 24 exposure ASA 400 film, one AA battery, Instruction pamphlet, and the 35mm camera. The camera has a built in flash, built in lens cover, fold down film rewind crank with release button, right thumb film advance wheel, frame counter, flash on/off slid switch, Optical viewfinder, carry strap, and a shutter button shaped like a hart. On the front of the camera is a picture of the main characters with “WILDCATS” under it. The camera came with a one year guarantee at sale date and has the Disney logo along with DisneyChannel.com printed on the package. The kit pictured here is in New condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
unknown companies: High School Musical (Walt Disney) camera  unknown companies: High School Musical (Walt Disney)c2009  20133.002009 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (1.3MP)
unknown companies: Interpur Titan Supercolor II camera  unknown companies: Interpur Titan Supercolor II1992  20033.001992 New condition worth $5.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Jazz 206 camera  unknown companies: Jazz 2061998  20075.001998 New condition worth $10.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Komax camera  unknown companies: Komaxc1990  20092.001990 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Kraft Cheesasaurus Rex super Sleuth camera  unknown companies: Kraft Cheesasaurus Rex super Sleuth  20165.001990's Good condition worth $5.00 in 2016
unknown companies: Lexxus camera  unknown companies: Lexxusc1995  19992.001995 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Lifelong camera  unknown companies: Lifelong1991  20002.001991 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Lifelong camera  unknown companies: Lifelong1991  20095.001991 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Little Tikes camera  unknown companies: Little Tikes2005  20113.002005 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (0.3MP)
unknown companies: Lockheed Martin Management Club camera  unknown companies: Lockheed Martin Management Clubc1990s  201610.00This camera had to be a giveaway at one of the many fund raisers the club has. The company logo can be seen on the front of the camera that is incased in a two piece locking case. This is an underwater camera with a bracket viewfinder as well as an optical viewfinder for land. The camera can be removed from the case and used as is. The camera has about a 38mm lens and uses regular 35mm film. It also has a built in lens cover, built in flash unit, flash ready LED by the optical viewfinder, flash on/off switch, frame counter, auto focus, auto film advance, auto rewind, and comes with a handy carry strap attached to the water proof case. The camera was made in China and looks like every other plastic 35mm camera of the 90’s plus. The water proof case does have a class flat lens that is screwed down with a ring seal that covers the lens (nice touch). The entire assembly looks to be only good for a very shallow dive, no more than 10 feet. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $20.00 in 2016.
unknown companies: Looney Tunes Mil-Looney-Um camera  unknown companies: Looney Tunes Mil-Looney-Um  20174.00Released by Warner Brothers in the year 1999, this is a 110 film cartridge camera shaped like a small can. Pictured on the camera is the Tasmanian Devil (TAZ), Silvester plus Tweety, Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and the Coyote without the Road Runner but the Road Runner is on the original box. Also on the camera and box are fireworks celebrating the new millennium thus the name “Mil-Looney-um”. The camera has a film view window in the back for frame count, optical view finder, a left thumb draw film advance wheel, and a handy built in carry strap. At this same time they released a Mil-Looney-um 2000 pendant, shirt with Bugs plus Daffy, coffee cup, lunch box, pin badge, bean bags (many characters), set of glasses, Back Packs, and a two collectable coin set that is worth far more now than in 1999. There also was a cartoon with all the Warner Brothers characters partying at the Mil-Looney-um 2000 dance. The camera came with the box, small warranty card, and a one sided instruction pamphlet in English only. Judging by the viewfinder the lens is about 28mm and the camera is for daytime use only without a flash socket or any way to attach one. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
unknown companies: Looney Tunes Taz camera  unknown companies: Looney Tunes Tazc1990s  201310.002009 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Looney Tunes Taz Flash camera  unknown companies: Looney Tunes Taz Flashc1990s  20155.001999 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015 (110 film)
unknown companies: MegaView Hot Shot camera  unknown companies: MegaView Hot Shot  20172.00The MegaView Hot Shot is a cheap 35mm focus free compact camer with a built in flash. The camera has a built in three position lens cover (closed/open/open with flash), large optical view finder, flash ready LED, frame counter, fold down film rewind crank handle, right thumb film advance wheel, one AA battery compartment, and a handy strap attach point. It has a “Made In China” sticker on the bottom but no company name. It is lite and weighs in without film at 4.27 ounces. The camera was made in the late 1990’s and probably stole the idea from the Bell and Howell Big Finder (BF) series of cameras that began in the early 1990’s. The camera has no suggestion for the ASA or ISO but it’s safe to say 100 in daylight to 400 with flash. This camera had a battery left in it that leaked and took out the flash capability. For this reason I have it listed in poor condition with a small p on poor because it still works without the flash. The camera is worth $1.50 in 2017.
unknown companies: Mini Shot 110 camera  unknown companies: Mini Shot 1101983  20102.001983 New condition worth $5.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Mini Shot 110 camera  unknown companies: Mini Shot 1101983  20102.001983 New condition worth $5.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Mini Shot 110 camera  unknown companies: Mini Shot 1101983  20102.001983 New condition worth $5.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Mini Shot 110 camera  unknown companies: Mini Shot 1101983  20102.001983 New condition worth $5.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Mini Shot 110 camera  unknown companies: Mini Shot 1101983  20102.001983 New condition worth $5.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Mini Shot 110 camera  unknown companies: Mini Shot 1101983  20102.001983 New condition worth $5.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Mini Shot 110 camera  unknown companies: Mini Shot 1101983  20102.001983 New condition worth $5.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Nitendo 64 camera  unknown companies: Nitendo 64c1996  20045.001996 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Nitendo 64 camera  unknown companies: Nitendo 64c1996  20178.00This is a promotional camera put out by Nintendo for the launch of the 64 bit system. It is a mostly all plastic focus free compact that came in five different colors, Yellow, orange, red, green, and blue. It has a 50mm lens, thumb wheel film advance, built in lens cover, large view finder, picture counter, rewind release, fold down rewind crank handle, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, right hand shutter button, and a handy carry strap. The release date in Japan for the Nintendo 64 was June 23 of 1996 and September 29 of 1996 for North America. The Nintendo 64 35mm was available early that same year and continued production by the Sakar company till 1998. The camera utilizes 35mm Film and works best with 200 or 400 ISO. It also needs two AA batteries to work the built in flash unit and has a flash off button. The lens cover seconds as an on/off switch for the whole camera and locks the shutter release. The camera pictured here is in New condition and worth $20.00 in 2017.
unknown companies: Optimus Digital Camera camera  unknown companies: Optimus Digital Camera2009  20153.002009 Good condition worth $8.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Panorama Wide Pic camera  unknown companies: Panorama Wide Pic  20172.00This almost all plastic 35mm camera was produced in the 1980’s and probably cost about $10 new with film in it. The only metal in it is the odd screw that may have been used. The camera has a viewfinder, thumb wheel film advance, frame counter on the top right, about a 28mm plastic lens, fold out film rewind crank, film release button, back cover release, a slide lens built in lens cover, focus free 35mm outdoor camera label on the front, and a handy non removable string carry strap. This is as close to a toy as you can come with a working camera. This is not a true Panorama camera because it crops the 35mm film internally and only uses a percentage of a full frame. When you take a used roll of film to a photo finisher, you have to order panoramic prints. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $4.00 in 2017.
unknown companies: Photo Flex MX-35 camera  unknown companies: Photo Flex MX-35c1990  20163.001990 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2016
unknown companies: Pink Eyelash camera  unknown companies: Pink Eyelashc1990s  20122.001990's good condition worth $4.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Pokemon camera  unknown companies: Pokemon1995  20153.001995 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
unknown companies: Red Baron camera  unknown companies: Red Baron1995  201610.001995 New condition worth $20.00 in 2016
unknown companies: Smart Living One Time Use 35mm camera  unknown companies: Smart Living One Time Use 35mm  20172.00The cameras are marked “Made In China” and most onetime use cameras from China are made by Huayuanda Electronic Co. Ltd and distributed here in the US by Foodhold USA Inc... The cameras have preloaded 35mm color film giving the user 27 exposures. They also have about a 28mm fixed focus lens, flash on button for the built in flash, flash ready LED, optical viewfinder, right thumb frame advance wheel, and a right hand shutter button. The cameras use a single AA battery to power the flash unit and were produced about 2010. The film is fully extended in the cameras and the user exposes a frame then accentually rewinds to the next frame. This cleverly gives the photo finisher a rewound cartridge of film. This will be the last time I enter One-Time use cameras here. The cameras pictured here are in new condition and worth $3.00 each in 2017.
unknown companies: Sterling Miniature camera  unknown companies: Sterling Miniaturec1939  200010.001939 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Sunpet 110 Pocket camera  unknown companies: Sunpet 110 Pocket  20172.00Sunpet Industries Limited is a company based in Hong Kong, and with manufacturing plants in mainland China, which produces a variety of optical goods, ranging from cheap novelty items to quite serious binoculars and telescopes. The firm was established as Sunny Industries in 1972, and changed to the current name in 1980. The company has made a number of simple cameras for 120, 35 mm, 126 and 110 film. Sunpet made the Vivitar Ultra-Wide and Slim cameras. Some 35 mm cameras are still listed among the firm's current products. The early 1980’s Sunpet 110 Pocket camera was also called the Sunpet 501. It is an inexpensive 110 camera for outdoor use with no flash capability. It was produced in red, pink, and a light greenish yellow. 110 film was introduced by Kodak in 1972. 110 is essentially a miniaturized version of Kodak's earlier 126 film format. Each frame is 13 mm × 17 mm (0.51 in × 0.67 in), with one registration hole to stop on the next frame. The film is fully housed in a plastic cartridge, which also registers the image when the film is advanced. There is a continuous backing paper, and the frame number and film type are visible through a window at the rear of the cartridge and a window is provided in the sunpet camera as all 110 film cameras. The camera pictured here is in New condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
unknown companies: Thomas The Tank Engine camera  unknown companies: Thomas The Tank Enginec2005  20135.002012 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Transparent camera  unknown companies: Transparent1995  19991.001995 Good condition worth $3.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Trump's Castle Casino Resort camera  unknown companies: Trump's Castle Casino Resort1997  20042.001997 Good condition worth $2.00 in 2014
unknown companies: U.S. News Panaview camera  unknown companies: U.S. News Panaviewc1990s  20015.001980 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Under Water camera camera  unknown companies: Under Water camera  20173.00This is probably the cheapest underwater 35mm camera ever constructed. You could only safely take this to 3 feet before it would leak. The camera body is as close to a one use as has ever been seen. The camera does have a larger than normal optical viewfinder and a fold down frame viewfinder for use underwater. It also has a film advance knob, frame counter, 28mm focus free lens, shutter release button, and a large yellow rubber band carry strap. This is a poolside camera released in the 90s. It has no labeling nor does it have any identifying markings. The casing is set-up like Tupper Ware with the bottom having an O-ring to seal it and four stays, two on either side. It also has an O-ring for the film advance knob and one for the shutter release plunger to keep out water. It is difficult to change film once the camera is removed from the container. The camera has no flash capability although a flash capable version must exist because this one has it imprinted in the camera and a blank cover where an on/off should be. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $5.00 in 2017.
unknown companies: Walgreens Studio 35 camera  unknown companies: Walgreens Studio 35c2000s  20103.002000-2005 good condition worth $3.00 in 2014
unknown companies: Winait Mini 100k Pen camera  unknown companies: Winait Mini 100k Pen  20125.002005 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014 (352 x 288 resolution)
Utility MFG: Falcon Miniature camera  Utility MFG: Falcon Miniature1938  20073.501939 Poor condition worth $3.50 for parts in 2014 (Bakelite back cover warped)
Vivitar: Crayola Sport (CR 450) camera  Vivitar: Crayola Sport (CR 450)1990  201015.001990 Fine condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Vivitar: CV35 camera  Vivitar: CV35c1980s 20173.00The Vivitar CV35 is a fixed-focus, plastic 35mm film camera marketed by Vivitar. It was introduced in early 1999, with a Vivitar press release calling it "an ideal first camera for young people and beginning photographers". The CV35 retail pack available on the market circa 2000 carried the copyright date ©1998, and sold for about USD $12, including one AA battery and a starter roll of film. Its most notable feature is a see-through translucent body, in clear or several colors of plastic—perhaps reflecting the design influence of Apple Computer's 1998 "gumdrop" iMacs. Variants under other Vivitar model designations are known. The camera also has a built in lens cover, a low-powered integrated flash, flash ready LED, flash on/off switch, optical viewfinder, frame counter, one shutter speed, a small aperture, and a film view window in the back cover. The CV35 might be considered to fall into the toy camera category, but its two-element lens raises it somewhat above the generic Taiwan junk camera. The AA battery needed to power the flash is cleverly fitted into the core of the film take-up spool. As with many cameras in this class, film must be present and engaged with a toothed sprocket thumb wheel in order for to cock the shutter, a "fail safe" design against miss-loaded film and double exposure. The original manual is strangely cavalier in suggesting film speeds from ISO 100 to ISO 1000, reflecting how reliant cameras like this are on the exposure latitude of color negative emulsions. The manual does note that slower films limit the flash range (under 8 feet with ISO 100 film); it also helpfully advises that even after the red "flash ready" light glows, it is best to wait a little while longer before actually shooting. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Vivitar: Freelance (V69379) camera  Vivitar: Freelance (V69379)c2011  20115.002011 New condition worth $10.00 in 2014 (2.0MP)
Vivitar: Freelance V15 camera  Vivitar: Freelance V152002  200710.002002 Good condition worth $8.00 in 2014 (1.3MP)
Vivitar: Freelance V15 camera  Vivitar: Freelance V152002  20163.002002 New condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (1.3MP)
Vivitar: Point n Shoot camera  Vivitar: Point n Shootc1980s 20156.00Vivitar actually made two versions of this camera. A black camera with white lettering and a red shutter button was introduced in 1986, and this more stylish purple version that was sold through Avon. This version was produced in 1987 and was sold exclusively through the giant catalog makeup company. The camera is completely purple with a minty green lettering and shutter button. It came complete with a matching purple wrist strap and zip up case. The camera has a fixed focus lens and fixed exposure, so it is as the name implies a point and shoot camera. You cannot adjust anything on the camera except to add a flash bar when needed. The camera produces 17mm x 13mm images from the 110 film. Both cameras were made in China and sold for about $40.00 when new. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2015.
Vivitar: Point n Shoot camera  Vivitar: Point n Shootc1980s 20173.00Vivitar actually made two versions of this camera. A black camera with white lettering and a red shutter button was introduced in 1986, and this more stylish purple version that was sold through Avon. This version was produced in 1987 and was sold exclusively through the giant catalog makeup company. The camera is completely purple with minty green lettering and shutter button. It came complete with a matching purple wrist strap and zip up case. The camera has a fixed focus lens and fixed exposure, so it is as the name implies a point and shoot camera. You cannot adjust anything on the camera except to add a flash bar when needed. The camera produces 17mm x 13mm images from the 110 film. Both cameras were made in China and sold for about $40.00 when new. The camera pictured here is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2017.
Vivitar: Spree Plus camera  Vivitar: Spree Plusc1994  200010.001994 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vista Tele Motor camera  Vivitar: Vista Tele Motor1993  20045.001993 Poor condition worth $1.00 for parts in 2014
Vivitar: Vivicam 25 camera  Vivitar: Vivicam 25c2003  20153.002012 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2015
Vivitar: Vivicam 3000 (Sound Vision Mini-209 / UMAX MDX-8000) camera  Vivitar: Vivicam 3000 (Sound Vision Mini-209 / UMAX MDX-8000)1997  199869.001997 Good condition worth $8.00 in 2014 (0.8MP)
Vivitar: Vivicam 3315 camera  Vivitar: Vivicam 33152002  20072.002002 poor condition worth $3.00 in 2014 (1.3MP)
Vivitar: Vivicam 3665 camera  Vivitar: Vivicam 3665c2002  20153.002000 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2015 (will not stay on)
Vivitar: Vivicam 5019 camera  Vivitar: Vivicam 50192009-2012  2009-2012 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (5.1MP)
Vivitar: Vivicam 5022 camera  Vivitar: Vivicam 50222009-2012  201410.002009-2012 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014 (5.1MP)
Vivitar: Vivicam F126 camera  Vivitar: Vivicam F1262015  201515.002015 New condition worth $35.00 in 2015 (14.1MP)
Vivitar: Vivitar (Focus Free) camera  Vivitar: Vivitar (Focus Free)1993  20145.001993 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar (Focus Free) camera  Vivitar: Vivitar (Focus Free)1993  200010.001993 Fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar 160Z camera  Vivitar: Vivitar 160Zc1989  20105.001990 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar 160Z camera  Vivitar: Vivitar 160Zc1989  20153.001990 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Vivitar: Vivitar 250 SL camera  Vivitar: Vivitar 250 SLc1976 201715.00The Vivitar 250/SL is a Cosina-made M42 mount, 35mm SLR, marketed by Vivitar. The Vivitar 250/SL was identical to the Vivitar 220/SL except for the addition of a shutter release lock lever, a battery check light, and a battery check button. The two cameras have identical specification and share the same instruction manual. This camera included typical features for a mid-range SLR; exposure counter window, film plane marker, and a "film-in-chamber" indicator near the rewind crank. The camera included an X Sync hot shoe. M Sync and X Sync flash terminals are available on the side of the camera. The focusing screen provides a micro prism spot to assist with focusing. Shutter speeds ranging from Bulb to 1/1000 of a second were possible with the vertical moving metal Copal Square shutter. The shutter release included a cable release socket and a self-timer. The camera included dual behind the lens CdS cells. The battery-powered light meter used a single 1.35 volt mercury cell: Mallory PX-675, Eveready E-675, or equivalent. The camera's film speed dial allowed the user to select ASA (ISO) values from 25 to 1600. This camera also has a 200mm f3.5 Vivitar lens worth $15.00. The camera pictured here in Good condition and lens together are worth $35.00 in 2017.
Vivitar: Vivitar 300 Z camera  Vivitar: Vivitar 300 Z1987  201310.001990 Fine condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar 35 EE camera  Vivitar: Vivitar 35 EEc1978 20175.00The Vivitar 35EE is a 35mm rangefinder camera with automatic exposure, rebadged to Vivitar specifications from the 1971 Cosina Cosina 35 in c1978. It is a simpler version of the Vivitar 35ES with a slower lens. The design owes a debt to the Konica C35 and 1974 Minolta Hi-Matic G. It also has a lot in common with the 1977 Mamiya 135 EE. Available in all black, or chrome with black covering, this camera was also rebadged with minor changes as the Chinon 35EE, Revue 400S, GAF Memo ET, Argus Cosina 35 and the Prinz 35E from Dixons. The camera has a 38mm f/2.8 (4 elements, 3 groups) lens with 46mm filter thread and a focusing Range of 0.9m to infinity. It also has auto-exposure via CdS "electric eye" above lens, shutter speeds: 1/30 to 1/650 of a second plus B (only at f/2.8), film speed capability of ISO 25 to 400, flashmatic system with X-sync on hot shoe and PC-socket at 1/25 of a second (Guide number scale on sticker on camera back). The viewfinder has a Brightline frame, parallax correction marks, overexposure and underexposure warning zones, with indicated approximate combined shutter speed and aperture (f/2.8 to f/14) selection shown by needle. The camera originally took a PX625 mercury cell battery. A zinc air equivalent or a higher voltage alkaline button battery can be used. This information taken from camerpedia. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and for display or parts worth $3.00 in 2017.
Vivitar: Vivitar 357PZ camera  Vivitar: Vivitar 357PZc1996  201410.001996 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar 450PZ camera  Vivitar: Vivitar 450PZc1995  200015.001995 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar 550PZ camera  Vivitar: Vivitar 550PZc2001  20155.002001 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Vivitar: Vivitar 604 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar 6041977  20076.001977 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar Big View BV35 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar Big View BV351995  200010.001995 Poor condition worth $0.50 for parts in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar Big View BV35DB camera  Vivitar: Vivitar Big View BV35DB1995  199915.001995 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar BV65 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar BV651996  20162.001996 poor condition worth $1.00 in 2016
Vivitar: Vivitar ECO35H camera  Vivitar: Vivitar ECO35H1990  20125.001990 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar EZ35 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar EZ35c1980s  200010.001990 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar EZ35 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar EZ35c1980s  20162.00This is a nice point and shoot Vivitar EZ35 35mm camera with 35mm FOCUS FREE color corrected lens. It has a two conductor hot shoe for flash, view finder, rewind crank on top, ¼” 20 thread female tripod attach point, and a carry strap attach point. It also comes with an insert for the exposure bay to crop the negative to make it look like wide angle or panorama picture. This 1980’s simple toy like camera pictured above is in Fine condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Vivitar: Vivitar HC 200 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar HC 2001991  19991.001991 poor condition worth $2.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar IC 100 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar IC 1001992  20145.001992 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar IC 100 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar IC 1001992  19995.001992 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar IC 100 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar IC 1001992  19985.001992 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar IC 101 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar IC 1011992  20145.001992 Fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar IC 101 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar IC 1011992  19995.001992 New condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar L.A. Brites camera  Vivitar: Vivitar L.A. Brites1985  20095.001985 good condition worth $3.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar LC 600 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar LC 6001995  20161.001995 New condition Worth $15.00 in 2016
Vivitar: Vivitar LC 650 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar LC 6501995  201110.001995 Fine condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar LF camera  Vivitar: Vivitar LF1985  20055.001985 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar LF tele camera  Vivitar: Vivitar LF tele1985  20065.001985 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar LF tele camera  Vivitar: Vivitar LF tele1985  20055.001985 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PN2011 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PN2011c1994  20145.001994 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PN2011 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PN2011c1994  20112.001994 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PN2011 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PN2011c1994  20095.001994 fine condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PN2011 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PN2011c1994  19975.001994 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar Pocket 600 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar Pocket 600c1976  20152.001977 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Vivitar: Vivitar PS 10 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PS 10c1987  201310.001989 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PS 135 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PS 135c1987  199110.001987 Good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PS 15 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PS 15c1990s  20161.00The Vivitar PS15 camera is a 35mm point and shoot film camera. The PS15 was designed to take 100 ASA 35mm, Cartridge Roll film. The camera requires two AA batteries to operate the built in flash but will work without them for outdoor photos. Unloaded, the camera weighs 4.76 ounces, with batteries 6.53 ounces, and with film 7.2 ounces. The camera has fold down rewind crank, rewind release button, flash on/off switch, right thumb film advance wheel, flash ready LED, film view window, frame count indicator, and a handy carry strap. The camera was made in China and introduced in 1992 by Vivitar. The camera came in a kit that included one roll of Kodak Gold Plus 100 film with 12 exposures, two AA Energizer batteries, instruction booklet, warranty postcard, carry strap, soft camera pouch case, and a few other sales papers plus coupons. The camera measures 4 5/8” long, 2 5/8” tall, and 1 ¾” deep. The camera pictured here is in poor condition due to a non-working flash. For this reason the camera is worth $0.50 in 2016.
Vivitar: Vivitar PS 20 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PS 20c1986  20135.001987 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PS 20 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PS 20c1986  20011.001987 good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PS 420 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PS 420c1995  20135.001995 Good condition worth $5.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PS 44 S camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PS 44 Sc1990  19985.001990 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PS 45 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PS 45c1987  20145.001987 poor condition worth $1.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar PZ3105 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar PZ3105c1997  20153.001997 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Vivitar: Vivitar SP35 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar SP35c1994  199910.001994 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar T101 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar T101c1998  201010.001998 New condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Vivitar: Vivitar TEC 35 Autofocus camera  Vivitar: Vivitar TEC 35 Autofocus1983 20173.00The 1983 Vivitar TEC 35 has autofocus from 1m (3.3ft) to infinity, motorized film advance plus rewind, built-in electronic flash which pops up by itself when needed plus returns to the body when through, CdS meter for programed auto exposure, and a Built in 10 second self-timer with beep plus LED emitting. It also has a unique LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) that blinks when the camera back is opened to remind you to set the proper ISO, verifies whether the film has been correctly loaded, and blinks to warn you that there is only enough power for two more rolls of film. Loading the film is as simple as dropping the cartridge into the open back and laying the film leader across the empty spool on the other side then closing the back and pushing the shutter release button causes the film to advance automatically to frame one. When the last picture on the roll has been taken, a built-in sensor causes the film to rewind automatically. The specifications for the camera are a 35mm F2.8 Pentax four elements, three groups lens with built-in 1A Skylight filter, Lens openings from F16 to F2.8, shutter speeds from ½ a second to 1/500 of a second with an automatic ''B'' mode for time exposures. Because of the additional electronics incorporated in the camera, the energy sources required include 2-AA batteries (alkaline manganese) and 1 built-in lithium battery. Dimension are 5.3x2x3 inches and the weight 14.1 ounces without batteries. The camera pictured here is in poor working condition and worth $2.00 for parts in 2017.
Vivitar: Vivitar XV-5 camera  Vivitar: Vivitar XV-5c1982  199130.001980-1982 Fine condition worth $45.00 in 2014
Voigtländer: Bessa camera  Voigtländer: Bessa1929-1949 201525.001929-1930 Good condition worth $50.00 in 2015. The Voigtländer Bessa was introduced in 1929. It was the first self-erecting rollfilm camera from Voigtländer, making 6x9cm images. The 1930 model is slightly smaller than the original (1929), and has flat body ends (the original 1929 version has rounded ends). The later model also had nickel trimmed body edges and a folding frame finder, which the original (1929) lacks. Both have a leatherette covered body with three-point front cell focusing (Landscape, Group and Portrait, written in German in red letters below the lens), and a Voigtar lens. The 1929 version has a 7.7/12cm lens in a Vario shutter while the 1930 version sports a 6.3/10cm lens in an Embezet shutter. On this 1929 model the Bessa label can only be found on the leather handle. The Voigtlander Bessa line of cameras are confusing in all years produced. This one is number A366835
Voigtländer: Bessa (1929) camera  Voigtländer: Bessa (1929) 201525.001929-1930 Good condition worth $50.00 in 2015. The Voigtländer Bessa was introduced in 1929. It was the first self-erecting rollfilm camera from Voigtländer, making 6x9cm images. The 1930 model is slightly smaller than the original (1929), and has flat body ends (the original 1929 version has rounded ends). The later model also had nickel trimmed body edges and a folding frame finder, which the original (1929) lacks. Both have a leatherette covered body with three-point front cell focusing (Landscape, Group and Portrait, written in German in red letters below the lens), and a Voigtar lens. The 1929 version has a 7.7/12cm lens in a Vario shutter while the 1930 version sports a 6.3/10cm lens in an Embezet shutter. On this 1929 model the Bessa label can only be found on the leather handle. The Voigtlander Bessa line of cameras are confusing in all years produced. This one is number A366835
Voigtländer: Bessy K camera  Voigtländer: Bessy K1965  20168.001965 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Voigtländer: Brillant (sheet metal) camera  Voigtländer: Brillant (sheet metal)1932  199020.001932-1935 good condition worth $35.00 in 2014
Voigtländer: Brillant V6 camera  Voigtländer: Brillant V61937  199020.001932-1938 Fine condition worth $100.00 in 2014
Voigtländer: Dynamatic I camera  Voigtländer: Dynamatic I1960-1962 201618.00The German made Voigtländer Dynamatic was produced 1960 to 1962. It is a 35mm automatic camera with a selenium 3-cell around the lens. It was offered in four models the Dynamatic, Dynamatic Delux and the Dynamatic II, and Dynamatic II Delux. The Dynamatic featured a Lathar f/2.8 50mm lens with a Prontormat S-V shutter 1/30 of a second to 1/300 of a second plus B, the Delux had the Color-Skopar f/2.8 50mm lens. It used a zone focus system. The Dynamatic had limited manual control options and was marketed as a SnapShooter camera as opposed to the more advanced controls offered in the Dynamatic II. It did have a threaded mount for a cable release, a flash socket and center mounted accessory shoe. It is capable of using ASA 10 to 400 35mm film. The camera has a frame counter that counts down but has to be set for each roll of film and exposures. The camera also has an auto exposure setting, rapid winding lever, optical viewfinder, rewind knob that pulls up for film release, film reversing lever, shutter speed window, ¼” 20 thread tripod mount, and a film type indicator in the rewind knob. One oddity was that it had no place to attach a strap but instead relied on the case for that and they only made about 27,000. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $30.00 in 2016.
Voigtländer: Vito B camera  Voigtländer: Vito B1954 201536.00The Vito B is an attractive and compact 35mm viewfinder made by Voigtländer and produced from 1954 to 1960. It has the fine Color-Skopar 50mm f/3.5 or f/2.8 lens (a four element Tessar-type). The Vito B was equipped with either a 4-speed Pronto shutter (B, 1/25th, 1/50th, 1/100th, and 1/200th sec) or 8-speed (B, 1, 1/2, 1/5th, 1/10th, 1/25th, 1/50th, 1/100th, and 1/300th sec) Prontor SVS shutter, the 4-speed shutter being discontinued in 1957. The shutter is cocked by the film engaging a sprocket wheel, preventing double exposure, and so will not cock if there is not a film present; this has led some to mistakenly diagnose the shutter of a working Vito B as broken. The self-timer mechanism can be engaged by moving the synchronizing lever to the V (green) position; however, given the age of the camera and the weak governing spring, using this feature is discouraged, as it can cause the camera to stop working. The Vito B's body is compact and rounded, a look characterized as "cute". It has some nice features including a hinged baseplate for easy loading (which also releases the back) and a milled film counter that counts down rather than up. The Vito B body existed in two versions, the first one (1954-57) had a small viewfinder and low profile top plate. The later version (1957-60) had a larger bright-frame viewfinder; while brighter and more useful than the original Vito B's viewfinder, some enthusiasts feel that this spoiled the appearance of the camera. The camera pictured here is in good condition worth $40.00 in 2016.
Voigtländer: Vito II camera  Voigtländer: Vito II1950-1954 201525.001950-1954 Fine condition worth $40.00 in 2015
Webster: Winpro 35 camera  Webster: Winpro 351947-1955 201610.00The Winpro 35 is claimed to be the first plastic injection-molded thirty-five millimeter camera. The cameras were introduced in 1948 and were made in either gray or black Tenite (Tenite was invented by Kodak in 1929 and is regarded as the first modern thermo-plastic) and proved to be quite rugged. The body molds were made for the Winpro by General Electric, another pioneer in synthetic materials. As a publicity stunt, Winpro cameras were dropped from tall buildings and survived intact and in working order. None of their competitors, which included Argus, Kodak and Ansco dared attempt such a feat. At $10.95, the camera proved to be very popular with buyers, and over 150,000 were sold in less than two years, a remarkable record for such a small camera manufacturing player. On the plate surrounding the lens you will find “Webster Industries Ink. Rochester, N.Y.”. The camera has three aperture stings of 8mm, 11mm, and 16mm. It also has two shutter settings of “I “(instant) and “T “(Time). The single shutter speed seems to 1/30 of a second. The camera pictured here is in Good condition and worth $15.00 in 2016.
White: Realist 35 (A) camera  White: Realist 35 (A)1954 201715.00The David White Company made architectural tools, but as a sideline they also created a stereo camera called the Realist. That launched the stereo fad of the 1950s. But the fad crested in the early 50s and White decided to test the waters with a non-stereo camera. They already had a relationship with a Hamburg company called Wilhelm Witt, which put out the Iloca line of cameras. White imported their Iloca Rapid plus the Rapid B and named them Realist 35 (A) and (B). The difference between the models A and B is the following. The model B had a Prontor-SVS shutter with speeds of 1 second to 1/300 of a second plus B. The model B also is a true combined view rangefinder with a larger viewfinder. The model A has a Vero shutter with speeds of 1/25 of a second to 1/200 of a second with B and you had to focus with judgment. The cameras were priced accordingly with the model A costing $42.50 and the model B costing $73.50 in 1954. Both cameras used the Steinheil ƒ2.8 55mm lens. They also had a left handed single action film advance lever, synchronized flash port, frame counter, utility holder on top, and a ¼ inch 20 thread tripod mount on the bottom. To open the back film compartment you have to pull the film winder knob up located behind the film advance lever about ¾ inch, and then give it a little counter-clockwise twist. That twist opens the spring loaded latch on the side and the whole back will pop off and out of the other side. To put the back on you need to hold the spring loaded far side and insert that side of the back then turn the winder knob again while lightly pressing the back home to complete the install. The camera pictured here (serial number 502407) is in Good condition and worth $30.00 in 2017.
White: Stereo-Realist 1041 camera  White: Stereo-Realist 10411947 201575.00Designed by Seton Rochwite and made by the David White Company, the Stereo Realist is the bestselling Stereo Camera of all time. It is a stereo camera with rangefinder focusing and takes photos in the 5p stereo format (also known as Realist format). The Stereo Realist camera was a camera that attracted celebrities throughout the 50s. The most notable user of the camera was silent film star, Harold Lloyd, who used the camera to do portraits of Marilyn Monroe and Bettie Page, among others. Advertisements of the time featured celebrities, many who were friends of Lloyd's and in his stereo camera club. Celebrities in these advertisements included Vincent Price (on the set of House of Wax), Edgar Bergen, John Wayne, James Cagney, Bob Hope, Joan Crawford, Doris Day, Cecil B. Demile, and Frank Capra. Popularity of the camera continued into the 60s and in 1971, the Realist Stereo Macro was added to the line of cameras. Today, the trademark is owned by John J. Zelenka, a stereo photographer. The start date of Production was 1947 for this 35mm viewfinder/rangefinder camera. The camera is quite wide measuring 175mm x 65mm high x 59mm deep and weighs 1.8 pounds. To give the stereo effect the Lens Separation is 69.28 mm on the David White Anastigmat (glass, matched), 1:3.5/35 mm lenses. It has Double lamellar type shutter, behind the lenses is cocked with a manual lever between the lenses. The shutter speeds are 1/150, 1/100, 1/50, 1/25, 1/10, 1/5, ½, 1 sec. and "B" and "T". The camera does have a Hot Shoe and a ¼ 20 thread per inch tripod socket. The David White Realist camera was based on the same design and was produced for many years with little or no changes. There are two basic models, the 3.5 (1041) and the 2.8 Realist (1042). Other than the lenses, they are essentially identical, except for the top shutter speed, which is marked 150 for the 3.5 and 200 for the 2.8. But even this different shutter speed is achieved with the same shutter. A good technician can adjust a 3.5 Realist to 1/200 top speed. The price of the Stereo Realist in 1947 was $160 plus $20 for the viewer and that equates to $1000.00 in today’s value. The camera pictured above is in fine condition and worth $220.00 in 2016.
Whitehouse: Beacon II camera  Whitehouse: Beacon IIc1947-1955  199210.001947-1955 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Whitehouse: Beacon Two-Twenty Five camera  Whitehouse: Beacon Two-Twenty Fivec1950-1958  199312.001950-1958 fine condition worth $25.00 in 2014
Wittnauer: Legionnaire camera  Wittnauer: Legionnaire1958  201325.001957-1960 fine condition worth $40.00 in 2014
Yamato: Pax M2 camera  Yamato: Pax M21956  201610.001956 Good condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Yashica: Electro 35 GS camera  Yashica: Electro 35 GS1969  201625.001970 fine condition worth $60.00 in 2016
Yashica: Electro 35 GSN camera  Yashica: Electro 35 GSN1975  201520.001973 Fine condition worth $75.00 in 2014
Yashica: Electro 35 GSN camera  Yashica: Electro 35 GSN1975  200630.001973 fine condition worth $55.00 in 2014
Yashica: Electro 35 GSN camera  Yashica: Electro 35 GSN1975  199135.001973 fine condition worth $55.00 in 2014
Yashica: Lynx 1000 camera  Yashica: Lynx 10001960 20167.00The Lynx 1000 belongs to the Yashica Lynx series of cameras which are fixed lens, leaf shutter cameras made in the 1960s. There are three versions: one with lens 45mm f/2.8 and shutter 1/500, one with lens 45mm f/1.8 and shutter 1/1000 and another, with lens 50mm f/1.8 and shutter 1/1000. The first version is sometimes called Lynx 2.8. The Lynx 1000 was introduced in 1960. It has an f1.8 45 mm lens with 6 elements in 4 groups and is threaded at 46mm for adding a filter. The Copal-SV blade shutter is capable of a maximum speed of 1/1000 of a second, an extra stop faster than most other diaphragm shutters. Light is metered using a small selenium photovoltaic cell behind a lens array, powering a galvanometer. The film speed for the metering system can be set from 10 to 800 ASA. Focusing is manual and the camera does have an X-sync flash socket that works with all speeds plus a cold shoe. The camera also has a right thumb film advance lever, coupled viewfinder/rangefinder that is parallax corrected, fold down rewind crank, frame counter, and two hard points for attaching a strap. The camera pictured here is in Poor condition and worth $5.00 for parts in 2016.
Yashica: Lynx 5000 camera  Yashica: Lynx 5000c1964-1969  201335.001962 fine condition worth $50.00 in 2014
Yashica: Profile AF camera  Yashica: Profile AF1995  20155.001995 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2015
Yashica: Sensation AF camera  Yashica: Sensation AF1994  201310.001993 fine condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Yashica: Sensation AF camera  Yashica: Sensation AF1994  20153.001994 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2015 (Battery compartment damage)
Yashica: Sensation Zoom 90 camera  Yashica: Sensation Zoom 901992  20125.001992 good condition worth $10.00 in 2014
Yashica: Sensation Zoom 90 camera  Yashica: Sensation Zoom 901992  20163.001992 good condition worth $5.00 in 2016
Yashica: Yashica 350 AF camera  Yashica: Yashica 350 AF1987  201310.001987 Poor condition worth $5.00 for parts in 2014
Yashica: Yashica A camera  Yashica: Yashica A1959  201622.001959 good condition worth $35.00 in 2016
Yashica: Yashica Autofocus S camera  Yashica: Yashica Autofocus S1979  201510.001979 fine condition worth $15.00 in 2015
Yashica: Yashica EZ Matic camera  Yashica: Yashica EZ Matic1966  201610.00The 1966 Yashica EZ-matic is a stylish camera for 126 film. It has two automatic exposure modes: aperture priority or a fully automatic exposure. The rounded lines on the body give it a classy look, and this is enhanced by the Selenium cell around the lens. The transport lever was moved to the lower back side of the camera, probably to simplify the look. With automatic exposure and an almost focus free wide-angle lens, this is practically a point-and-shoot camera. The Yashica EZ-matic features an accessory shoe and may be the only 126 film camera with a self-timer. It has a 37mm/2.7 Yashinon lens. Yashinon lenses are said to be of Tessar design and enjoy a good reputation. It can be stopped down to f/16. The selenium cell exposure meter is placed within the limits of the filter thread, so that placing a filter does not necessitate an exposure correction; light is metered through the filter. The viewfinder shows image frame lines and a shutter-speed scale. There is however, no way to directly choose a shutter-speed. Leave that to one of the exposure programs. The camera pictured here is in Poor working condition due to the shutter. It fires but does not open. The camera is in pristine esthetic condition and worth $10.00 in 2016.
Yashica: Yashica EZS Zoom 70 camera  Yashica: Yashica EZS Zoom 701995  200010.001995 Good condition worth $15.00 in 2014
Yashica: Yashica FR II camera  Yashica: Yashica FR II1978  201425.001977-1981 Good condition worth $30.00 in 2014
Yashica: Yashica FR II camera  Yashica: Yashica FR II1978  200930.001977-1981 Good condition worth $45.00 with the lens in 2014
Yashica: Yashica ME-1 camera  Yashica: Yashica ME-11978  20165.001970 Fine condition worth $25.00 in 2016
Yashica: Yashica MG-1 camera  Yashica: Yashica MG-11975  201623.00The MG-1 was released in 1975 and discontinued in 1980. It has an electronic controlled leaf-type shutter providing continuous variable speeds from 1/500 of a second to 2 seconds approximately. It also has built-in self-timer, direct X contact shoe (shutter speed automatically sets at 1/30 sec. when the Auto Lever is adjusted to 'flash'), and a 45mm f/2.8 Yashinon lens composed of four elements in three groups.This is one of the last metal cameras before the "Plastic Age". The Yashica MG-1 is a full size rangefinder. The automatic functions is a feature which makes it easy to use. The almost total lack of manual control is no doubt a limitation. It is achieved with a higher cost. The ASA range is from 25 to 800 and the camera has a one action 180 degree film advance thumb lever. The viewfinder uses red and yellow exposure indicator arrows visible through the eye piece. Using the viewfinder/rangefinder focus is secured by rotating the focusing ring and superimposing two images in the focusing spot at the center of the viewfinder field. The focus range is from 1 meter (3.3ft) to infinity. The power was provided by a 5.6V mercury battery (Eveready E164 Mallory PX32 or equivalent) but now can use a 6V Alkaline A32, A164, or A32PX single battery. The Yashica MG-1 was the last in the respected Electro 35 series, which began in 1966. It’s the only camera in the series that doesn’t have “Electro 35” stamped somewhere on the top plate. The camera pictured here is in fine condition worth $40.00 in 2016.
Yashica: Yashica TL Electro X camera  Yashica: Yashica TL Electro X1968-1974  201315.001968-1974 good condition worth $20.00 in 2014
Yashica: Yashica TL Electro X camera  Yashica: Yashica TL Electro X1968-1974  201610.001968-1974 good condition worth $20.00 in 2016
Yashica: Zoomate 70 camera  Yashica: Zoomate 701996  20162.002002 Poor condition worth $0.50 in 2016
Zeiss Ikon: Box Tengor 54/18 (Baby Box) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Box Tengor 54/18 (Baby Box)1930-1938  201621.001930-1934 Good condition worth $40.00 in 2016
Zeiss Ikon: Box Tengor 54/2 camera  Zeiss Ikon: Box Tengor 54/21932-1939  201535.001932-1939 fine condition worth $45.00 in 2015
Zeiss Ikon: Contaflex Super (10.1271) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Contaflex Super (10.1271)1959-1962  201575.001959-1962 fine condition worth $100.00 in 2015
Zeiss Ikon: Contaflex Super (10.1271) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Contaflex Super (10.1271)1959-1962  201325.001959-1962 Poor condition worth $30.00 for parts in 2015 (Shutter stuck open)
Zeiss Ikon: Contaflex Super (10.1271) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Contaflex Super (10.1271)1959-1962  201422.001959-1962 Poor condition worth $40.00 for parts in 2015 (Shutter problems but does work)
Zeiss Ikon: Contina Ia (526/24) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Contina Ia (526/24)1954-1958 201716.00This solid and well-made camera was manufactured from 1954-1958. It is fitted with a Novar-Anastigmat 45mm f/3.5 lens in a Prontor SVS shutter. It’s a three element design, hardly the most sophisticated, which reflects the position of this camera at the low end of the Zeiss range. The Contina Ia is a rigid-bodied 35mm viewfinder camera, and the simplest of the Contina range, which were all popular cameras. It was the successor to the earlier Contina I, a folding camera, itself previously named the Ikonta 35. Even though the Contina Ia lacks a built-in rangefinder, as do all the rigid-bodied Contina’s, it is certainly capable of rewarding careful use by returning good results. The shutter speeds range from 1 second to 1/300 of a second. The Contina has a female thread for a manual cable release, in the middle of the shutter release, which is almost hidden in the middle of the film counter. Focusing is achieved by turning the front cell of the lens, on which are printed distance markings and just above them, is a depth-of-field scale. The camera also has a flash PC-socket in front, accessory mount on the top, optical viewfinder, film release rewind button on the bottom, single action right thumb frame advance lever, and a ¼” 20 thread tripod mount. The camera pictured here is in fine condition and worth $30.00 in 2017.
Zeiss Ikon: Ikoflex I camera  Zeiss Ikon: Ikoflex I1939-1951  201642.001939-1951 Good condition worth $80.00 in 2016
Zeiss Ikon: Ikomatic A (10.0552) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Ikomatic A (10.0552)1964-1965  201512.001964-1965 Good condition worth $20.00 in 2015
Zeiss Ikon: Ikonta 520/2 (Ikonta C) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Ikonta 520/2 (Ikonta C)1929-1937 201622.00The 520/2 is the first in the long Ikonta line of a folding cameras, produced by the German company Zeiss Ikon. It takes 8 images size 6x9 cm on 120 type rollfilm and comes equipped with a variety of lenses and shutters. This camera has a Novar 6.3/10.5 cm lens in a Derval shutter. The camera was in production from 1929 to 1937. The format is 6 x 9 cm on 120 type rollfilm with no double exposure prevention. The cameras metal case has a Black finish with chrome ornaments and black colored leatherette. The dimensions are (WxHxD folded) 178x84x38 mm and it weighs in at 625 grams. This camera has shutter speeds of 1/25, 1/50, and 1/100 of a second plus time and bulb. This Ikonta also has a frame work fold down viewfinder, a brilliant viewfinder, two 3/8” tripod mounts for portrait and landscape, a plunger shutter mount, an adjustment range of 2 foot to infinity, and a table top fold out leg. The Ikonta cameras were renamed and rereleased as the Ikomat 520 (4.5 x 6cm), 520/2 (6 x 9cm), 520/14 (5 x 7.5cm), 520/15 (6.5 x 11cm), 520/16 (6 x 6cm) and 520/18 (3 x 4cm). The camera pictured here is in good condition and worth $50.00 in 2016.
Zeiss Ikon: Ikonta 521 (Ikonta A, vertical) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Ikonta 521 (Ikonta A, vertical)1938-1954  201552.001938-1954 fine condition worth $100.00 in 2015
Zeiss Ikon: Nettax 513/16 (6x6) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Nettax 513/16 (6x6)1955-1957 201515.001955-1957 fine condition worth $100.00 in 2015
Zeiss Ikon: Tenax Automatic (10.0651) camera  Zeiss Ikon: Tenax Automatic (10.0651)1960-1963  201525.001960-1963 fine condition worth $75.00 in 2015